Comparison of hly from different health surveys
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 18

Comparison of HLY from different health surveys PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 97 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Comparison of HLY from different health surveys. 4th Meeting of the Task Force on Health Expectancies Luxembourg, 4 th June 2007 Bianca Cox. Introduction. EHEMU Information System : Health expectancies for 25 European countries Demographic data Eurostat + national statistical centers

Download Presentation

Comparison of HLY from different health surveys

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Comparison of hly from different health surveys

Comparison of HLY from different health surveys

4th Meeting of the Task Force on Health Expectancies

Luxembourg, 4th June 2007

Bianca Cox


Introduction

Introduction

  • EHEMU Information System :

    Health expectancies for 25 European countries

    • Demographic data

      Eurostat + national statistical centers

    • Health data

      Eurostat, DG SANCO, Mannheim University

       from different European surveys


Introduction1

Introduction


Introduction2

Introduction

  • Are the health expectancies for a given country comparable between the surveys?

  • Surveys carried out in the same year (2004):

    ESS, SHARE, SILC

     Common health indicators :

    • Self-Percieved Health (SPH)

    • Activity Limitation (AL)


Comparison of hly from different health surveys

Data

  • Health expectancies

    comparison WITHIN country :

    same demographic data

  • Raw health data (prevalences)

    • Self-Percieved Health : good, fair, bad 

    • Activity Limitation : without, moderate, severe

  • Average over 5-year age groups:

    50-54, 55-59,…, 85+


Analyses

Analyses

  • Health expectancies : graphical exploration

  • Prevalences : logistic regression

     Separate model for each health state and gender

    • Overall models :

      • Main effects : survey, agegr, country

      • Interactions : survey*agegr, survey*country, agegr*country

    • Country-specific models :

      • Main effects : survey, agegr

      • Interactions : survey*agegr

         Odds ratio estimates of one survey vs the other for agegroups 50, 65 and 85+


Results graphical exploration sph health expectancies

Results : Graphical exploration SPH health expectancies


Comparison of hly from different health surveys

Results : Graphical exploration AL health expectancies


Results graphical exploration health expectancies

Results : Graphical exploration health expectancies

  • Common trend in some countries :

    • Self-Perceived Health :

      • Good : SHARE > ESS > SILC

      • Bad : SHARE < ESS < SILC

    • Activity Limitation :

      • Without : ESS > SILC > SHARE

      • Severe : ESS < SHARE < SILC

  • Confidence intervals of health expectancies :

    SILC << SHARE < ESS


Results logistic models on prevalences

Results : Logistic models on prevalences

  • Overall models :

    • Survey*agegr, survey*country, agegr*country

      • SPH: sign. in all 6 models

      • AL: sign. in 4 models (not in ♀models for “without” & “severe”)

    •  Effect of survey different for different age groups and countries

  • Country-specific models :

    • Odds ratio estimates of one survey vs the other for age groups 50, 65 and 85+


Results logistic models on sph prevalences

Results : Logistic models on SPH prevalences

+ or -odds ratio > 1 or odds ratio < 1

A & Bnumber of models with a significant odds ratio

Cnumber of models with a odds ratio > 1


Results distribution of odds ratio estimates for sph

Results : Distribution of odds ratio estimates for SPH

Good SPH males

SH > ES > SI

Good SPH females

Bad SPH males

SH (<) ES < SI

Bad SPH females


Results logistic models on al prevalences

Results : Logistic models on AL prevalences

+ or -odds ratio > 1or odds ratio < 1

A & Bnumber of models with a significant odds ratio

Cnumber of models with a odds ratio > 1


Comparison of hly from different health surveys

Results : Distribution of odds ratio estimates for AL

Without AL males

ES > SI > SH

Without AL females

Severe AL males

ES < SH < SI

Severe AL females


Discussion

Discussion

  • Significant effect of survey, different for different age groups and countries

  • Still : odds ratios show common trend across age groups and countries

    • Good SPH : SH > ES > SI

    • Bad SPH : SH (<) ES < SI

    • Without AL : ES > SI > SH

    • Severe AL : ES < SH < SI

  • Significance of odds ratios increases with age but also the variability in the distribution of the odds ratio estimates

     chance effects due to smaller sample sizes


Discussion1

Discussion

  • Possible reasons for differences between surveys :

    • Different sampling designs :

      Sr = Simple random sampling

      Systrs = Systematic random sampling

      Stratrs = Stratified random sampling

      Ms = Multi-stage sampling

      Final sampling units: P = Persons

      H = Households

      A = Addresses

      T = Telephone numbers

      D = Dwellings

      But : Sampling design depends more on country than on survey

       Survey design often constrained by what is available in the country


Discussion2

Discussion

  • Possible reasons for differences between surveys :

    • Different selection bias : e.g. participation / item response

    • Different sample sizes : SILC > SHARE > ESS

    • Different position in questionnaire

    • Differences in wording:

      • SPH : “ How is your health in general ? ”

        ESS & SILC general questionnaires : “health” further specified (f.e. including mental health) in footnote or between brackets

         Also in country-specific questionnaires or spoken out by interviewer ??


Discussion3

Discussion

  • AL :

    - ESS : “ Are you hampered in your daily activities in any way by any longstanding illness, or disability, infirmity or mental health problem ? ”

    - SHARE & SILC : “ For the past six months at least, to what extent have you been limited because of a health problem in activities people usually do ? ”


  • Login