Writing workshop
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Writing Workshop. On Writing.

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Writing Workshop

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Writing workshop

Writing Workshop


On writing

On Writing

  • Gonzaga College High School writing teacher, Rick Cannon: "Writing is a solitary, late night, early morning sort of thing. Unless you're a literary genius - a Shakespeare or a Crane - it's never a one-shot deal, always revision, revision, revision, over time. Writing well frustrates and exhausts, and one soon begins to think he'd rather scrape the inside of his skull with a spoon."


On writing continued

On Writing Continued

WRITE TO EXPRESS, NOT TO IMPRESS

  • “A great many people do write just to impress. And because of that they write badly. They use language as a weapon. Big, multi-syllabic, Latinate words are thrown around like brickbats in the professional world. They are meant to impress, to intimidate, to demonstrate vocabulary, to justify salary by making the simple seem complex and the complex, impossible.”


Let s prove this guy wrong

Let’s Prove This Guy Wrong

  • Cannon also says, “he couldn’t [teach writing this way] with five large classes a day, as some public high school teachers have.”

    DON’T LISTEN TO HIM. YOU DON’T HAVE TO GO TO A PRIVATE SCHOOL. WITH HARD WORK, YOU CAN BE JUST AS GOOD. YOU CAN BE BETTER.


Cosmetics

Cosmetics

  • THIS = a demonstrative adjective. A noun must follow it.

  • A literary work is always in the present tense. What the father does on 245 he is always doing on 245. DON’T: “When the father said…” DO: “When the father states…”

  • The Road or The Road. Longer works are not in quotation marks.

  • Use strong, lean verbs. DON’T: “the son is wanting” DO: “the son wants”


Content

Content

1. THESIS STATEMENT

Should make a claim

Should let the reader know how you will

prove the claim (3 points usually)

2. TOPIC SENTENCES (1st sentence of each paragraph)

Should make a claim

Should attach to thesis statement

3. ANALYSIS

Should have AT LEAST one quote per claim

Should never have a quote that is longer than analysis

Should not summarize more than one sentence or half-sentence after the quote

Should attach immediately back to THESIS and TOPIC SENTENCE: What are you proving? How does this quote prove it? Refer back to the specific language of the quote.


Paraphrasing vs plagiarism

Paraphrasing vs. Plagiarism

  • If you are using the EXACT LANGUAGE of the text from which you are getting your information, you need to put it in quotation marks and cite it. If you do not, it is plagiarism.

  • If you take the INFORMATION from the text with which you are working, but put it in your own words, you DO NOT need to quote, but you need to cite.

    NOTE: A dead giveaway that you do not understand the article or book is simply repeating what is says out of context. You are not teaching your reader or using skills of paraphrasing and quoting to get information across.


Mla heading

MLA Heading

Last name pg. #

Your Name

My name

Class

Day Month Year

Title


Works cited page

Works Cited Page

Last name pg. #

Works Cited


Commonly used works cited

Commonly Used Works Cited

Books

Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book. City of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication. Medium of Publication.


Commonly used works cited1

Commonly Used Works Cited

Entire Website

Editor, author, or compiler name (if available). Name of

Site. Version number. Name of

institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher), date of resource creation (if available). Medium of publication. Date of access.


Commonly used works cited2

Commonly Used Works Cited

Article from Website

Bernstein, Mark. "10 Tips on Writing the Living Web." A List Apart: For People Who Make Websites. A List Apart Mag., 16 Aug. 2002. Web. 4 May 2009.


Commonly used works cited3

Commonly Used Works Cited

Article from Web Scholarly Journal

Wheelis, Mark. "Investigating Disease Outbreaks Under a Protocol to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention." Emerging Infectious Diseases 6.6 (2000): 595-600. Web. 8 Feb. 2009.


Commonly used works cited4

Commonly Used Works Cited

Article from Online Database

Langhamer, Claire. “Love and Courtship in Mid-Twentieth-Century England.” Historical Journal50.1 (2007): 173-96. ProQuest. Web. 27 May 2009.


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