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It’s a Great Story! PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Math. It’s a Great Story!. Cynthia Miller. MATU 206 Professor Hanan Chapman University. Stories have always been a part of human existence. Why stories?. It is the way we have come to understand our world. The human mind works in stories.

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It’s a Great Story!

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It s a great story

Math

It’s a Great Story!

Cynthia Miller

MATU 206

Professor Hanan

Chapman University


It s a great story

Stories have always been a part of human existence.


It s a great story

Why stories?

  • It is the way we have come to understand our world.

  • The human mind works in stories.

  • If we don’t understand, we make a story in our mind.

  • Science is a story –

    Story of how the universe came to exist.


It s a great story

NCTM Standards

  • NCTM argues that there is an aesthetic art to mathematics.

  • “Literature helps express the thought that math represents shapes, designs, events and sets in multiple ways.”

  • “We should incorporate writing, drawing and discussion to represent math in different ways.”


It s a great story

California Frameworks

  • “Students who understand the aesthetics and beauty of mathematics will have a deep understanding of how mathematics enriches their lives.”

  • “Students who can see the interdependence of mathematics and music, art, architecture, science, philosophy, and other disciplines will become lifelong students of mathematics regardless of the career they pursue.”


It s a great story

Traditional

Myths Busted

  • Math stories are not frivolous, but supportive of mathematical understanding.

  • Math stories are not interruptions but the catalyst to query and exploration.


It s a great story

Stories and Mathematics

  • Stories make mathematics come alive.

  • Using literature shows the students that mathematics is a natural communication system.

  • Show that math is a tool for helping us live, learn, and explore our world.

  • Math is a way of solving real-life problems, and a source of pleasure and recreation.


It s a great story

Relating to Math Stories

  • Math stories help students relate math to their own personal narratives.

  • Literature gives the student an opportunity to take a basic story and transform it into their own story.

  • They can relate the math stories to things that they are interested in and that makes sense to them.


It s a great story

What are math stories?

  • Picture books that have a mathematics theme.

  • Picture books and short stories possessing a problem-solving theme.

  • Novels that contain opportunities to discuss mathematics or problem-solving.

  • Poems with a mathematical theme.

  • Share stories that invite students to investigate – to reach out and touch the subject.


It s a great story

How to Read Math Stories

  • Enjoy the story.

  • Read aloud at least once, usually more.

  • Read it all the way through the first time.

  • Ask open-ended questions.

  • Exploratory activities and responses.

  • Group work.

  • Have books available for personal reading.


It s a great story

Math Stories in the Classroom

  • Problem-posing to reinforce problem-solving.

  • Capitalize on doubt and skepticism.

  • Invite personal connections.

  • Take students’ interest into consideration.

  • Integrate into other subjects if possible.


It s a great story

Open-Ended Questions

  • Who would like to say something about this story?

  • What did you think about this story?

  • What did this story make you wonder about?

  • Compare this story to some concepts we have already explored?

  • What could you change to get a different answer?

  • Can you predict the outcome if we changed ______?


It s a great story

Responding to Math Stories

Offer exploratory choices in responding to stories.

  • Create a game.

  • Make an illustration.

  • Interview an adult about the concept.

  • Write a letter to someone about the concept.

  • Rewrite the story with their own details.

  • Share puzzles and challenges.


It s a great story

  • Write a letter to someone explaining the concept.


It s a great story

  • Rewrite the story with their own details.


It s a great story

  • Share puzzles and challenges.


It s a great story

Collaborative Community of Mathematical Explorers

  • Encourage students to talk about parts they didn’t understand.

  • Listen, acknowledge, and expand on the students’ perspectives.

  • Support different explanations.

  • Follow the students’ lead – giving students ownership over exploration.

  • Encourage hypothesis.


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