Tools and Vehicles for Knowledge Transfer: The Role of Information Professionals

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Tools and Vehicles for Knowledge Transfer: The Role of Information Professionals. Evidence-based Public Health Knowledge Transfer (KT) Principles KT Barriers and Promoters KT Tools and Methods Role of Information Professionals in KT . The Evidence Environment. Accountability Scarce resources

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Tools and Vehicles for Knowledge Transfer: The Role of Information Professionals

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1. Elena Goldblatt ,Library Coordinator, Public Health and Community Services Library Yvonne Tyml, Librarian, Middlesex-London Health Unit Gayle Jessop, Public Health Librarian Region of Waterloo Public Health Beata Pach, Information/Knowledge Specialist MOHLTC Strategic Planning and Implementation Branch Crystal Merriott, Library Coordinator, Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit Tools and Vehicles for Knowledge Transfer: The Role of Information Professionals

2. Tools and Vehicles for Knowledge Transfer: The Role of Information Professionals Evidence-based Public Health Knowledge Transfer (KT) Principles KT Barriers and Promoters KT Tools and Methods Role of Information Professionals in KT Today we are going to talk about Tools and Vehicles for Knowledge Transfer: The Role of Information Professionals. We will be covering the following topics: Evidence- Based Public Health Knowledge Transfer (KT) Principles KT Barriers and Promoters KT Tools and Methods Role of Information Professionals in KT In this talk we are going to be using these terms interchangeably : Information professionals, public health librarians, information specialistsToday we are going to talk about Tools and Vehicles for Knowledge Transfer: The Role of Information Professionals. We will be covering the following topics: Evidence- Based Public Health Knowledge Transfer (KT) Principles KT Barriers and Promoters KT Tools and Methods Role of Information Professionals in KT In this talk we are going to be using these terms interchangeably : Information professionals, public health librarians, information specialists

3. The Evidence Environment Accountability Scarce resources Client experience and quality of care Recent reports Speaking notes There has been a trend in recent years to promote the use of “evidence” in public health. Why is there this emphasis? First, members of the public are increasingly expecting accountability with regards to publicly-funded institutions. A number of governments around the world are talking about evidence-based policy and programs. In Ontario’s public health environment, evidence is mentioned explicitly in the Mandatory Health Programs and Services Guidelines. Another reason why we are seeing an increased emphasis on evidence is that we live and work in an environment of scarce resources. Governments are expected to balance budgets, avoiding deficits and debt. As we know, there are many competing interests and initiatives. In this environment, solid evidence is needed to support requests for funding. And of course the literature suggests that evidence-based approaches improve client experience and quality of care. Evidence has been mentioned numerous times in many recent, high profile Public Health reports and commissions. For example, we have: The Walker report The Naylor report The recent Report of the Agency Implementation Task Force; and Operation Health Protection Speaking notes There has been a trend in recent years to promote the use of “evidence” in public health. Why is there this emphasis? First, members of the public are increasingly expecting accountability with regards to publicly-funded institutions. A number of governments around the world are talking about evidence-based policy and programs. In Ontario’s public health environment, evidence is mentioned explicitly in the Mandatory Health Programs and Services Guidelines. Another reason why we are seeing an increased emphasis on evidence is that we live and work in an environment of scarce resources. Governments are expected to balance budgets, avoiding deficits and debt. As we know, there are many competing interests and initiatives. In this environment, solid evidence is needed to support requests for funding. And of course the literature suggests that evidence-based approaches improve client experience and quality of care. Evidence has been mentioned numerous times in many recent, high profile Public Health reports and commissions. For example, we have: The Walker report The Naylor report The recent Report of the Agency Implementation Task Force; and Operation Health Protection

4. Evidence approaches and terminology Different approaches Varied terminology Speaking notes There is no shortage of terminology used when referring to evidence in public health. We have: “evidence-based public health” “evidence-based decision making” “evidence-informed policy and practice”; and “best available evidence and science” And then there are the related terms such as: “best practices” “better practices” “best and promising practices” knowledge “experienced-based practice”; and “practice-based evidence” Speaking notes There is no shortage of terminology used when referring to evidence in public health. We have: “evidence-based public health” “evidence-based decision making” “evidence-informed policy and practice”; and “best available evidence and science” And then there are the related terms such as: “best practices” “better practices” “best and promising practices” knowledge “experienced-based practice”; and “practice-based evidence”

5. “The development, implementation and evaluation of effective programs and policies in public health through application of principles of scientific reasoning, including systematic uses of data and information systems, and appropriate use of behavioral science theory and program planning models”

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