Common lisp a gentle introduction to symbolic computation
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COMMON LISP: A GENTLE INTRODUCTION TO SYMBOLIC COMPUTATION. David S. Touretzky. INTRODUCTION. RECURSION. A function to search for odd numbers ( defun anyoddp (x) ( cond ((null x) nil) (( oddp (first x)) t) (t ( anyoddp (rest x)))))

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COMMON LISP: A GENTLE INTRODUCTION TO SYMBOLIC COMPUTATION

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Common lisp a gentle introduction to symbolic computation

COMMON LISP:A GENTLE INTRODUCTIONTO SYMBOLIC COMPUTATION

David S. Touretzky


Introduction

INTRODUCTION


Recursion

RECURSION

  • A function to search for odd numbers

    (defunanyoddp (x)

    (cond ((null x) nil)

    ((oddp (first x)) t)

    (t (anyoddp (rest x)))))

    [6]> (trace anyoddp)

    ;; Tracing function ANYODDP.

    (ANYODDP)

    [9]> (anyoddp '( 2 4 6 7 8 9))

    1. Trace: (ANYODDP '(2 4 6 7 8 9))

    2. Trace: (ANYODDP '(4 6 7 8 9))

    3. Trace: (ANYODDP '(6 7 8 9))

    4. Trace: (ANYODDP '(7 8 9))

    4. Trace: ANYODDP ==> T

    3. Trace: ANYODDP ==> T

    2. Trace: ANYODDP ==> T

    1. Trace: ANYODDP ==> T

    T

    [10]>(untraceanyoddp)


Recursion1

RECURSION

  • A Lisp version of the Factorial function

    (defun fact (n)

    (cond ((zerop n) 1)

    (t (* n (fact (- n 1))))))

  • For example:

    Factorial(5) = 5 X Factorial(4)

    = 5 X 4 X Factorial(3)

    = 5 X 4 X 3 X Factorial(2)

    = 5 X 4 X 3 X 2 X Factorial(1)

    = 5 X 4 X 3 X 2 X 1 X Factorial(0)

    = 5 X 4 X 3 X 2 X 1 X 1

Break 2 [13]> (fact 6)

1. Trace: (FACT '6)

2. Trace: (FACT '5)

3. Trace: (FACT '4)

4. Trace: (FACT '3)

5. Trace: (FACT '2)

6. Trace: (FACT '1)

7. Trace: (FACT '0)

7. Trace: FACT ==> 1

6. Trace: FACT ==> 1

5. Trace: FACT ==> 2

4. Trace: FACT ==> 6

3. Trace: FACT ==> 24

2. Trace: FACT ==> 120

1. Trace: FACT ==> 720

720


Recursion2

RECURSION

  • If we represent a slice of bread(一片麵包)by a symbol, then a loaf (一條麵包)can be represented as a list of symbols.

  • The problem of finding how many slices a loaf contains is thus the problem of finding how many elements a list contains.

  • This is of course what LENGTH does, but if we didn’t have LENGTH, we could still count the slices recursively.

    (defun count-slices (loaf)

    (cond ((null loaf) 0)

    (t (+ 1 (count-slices (rest loaf))))))

    Break 3 [14]> (count-slices '(X X X X X X))

    6


Exercises

EXERCISES

  • Write ALLODDP, a recursive function that returns T if all the numbers in a list are odd.

  • Write a recursive version of MEMBER. Call it REC-MEMBER so you don’t redefine the built-in MEMBER function.


Infinite recursion

INFINITE RECURSION

  • For examples:

    Fib(n) = Fib(n-1) + Fib(n-2)

    (defun fib (n)

    (+ (fib (- n 1))

    (fib (- n 2))))

    Fib(4) = Fib(3) + Fib(2)

    Fib(3) = Fib(2) + Fib(1)

    Fib(2) = Fib(1) + Fib(0)

    Fib(1) = Fib(0) + Fib(-1)

    Fib(0) = Fib(-1) + Fib(-2)

    Fib(-1) = Fib(-2) + Fib(-3)

    Fib(-2) = Fib(-3) + Fib(-4)

    Fib(-3) = Fib(-4) + Fib(-5)…Can you stop it?

(defun fib (n)

(cond ((equal n 0) 1)

((equal n 1) 1)

(t (+ (fib (- n 1))

(fib (- n 2))))))


Exercises1

EXERCISES

  • What is the meaning of the following function?

    (defun find-first-atom (x)

    (cond ((atom x) x)

    (t (find-first-atom (first x)))))

    (defun laugh (n)

    (cond ((zerop n) nil)

    (t (cons ’ha (laugh (- n 1))))))


Simultaneous recursion on several variables

SIMULTANEOUS RECURSION ON SEVERAL VARIABLES

  • For example, suppose we want to write a recursive version of NTH, called MYNTH. With each recursive call we reduce n by one and take successive RESTs of the list x.

  • The resulting function demonstrates single-test tail recursion with simultaneous recursion on two variables.

    (defun my-nth (n x)

    (cond ((zerop n) (first x))

    (t (my-nth (- n 1) (rest x)))))

    Break 6 [17]> (my-nth 2 '( a b c d e))

    1. Trace: (MY-NTH '2 '(A B C D E))

    2. Trace: (MY-NTH '1 '(B C D E))

    3. Trace: (MY-NTH '0 '(C D E))

    3. Trace: MY-NTH ==> C

    2. Trace: MY-NTH ==> C

    1. Trace: MY-NTH ==> C

    C


Simultaneous recursion on several variables1

SIMULTANEOUS RECURSION ON SEVERAL VARIABLES

  • Conditional Augmentation

    • In some list-processing problems we want to skip certain elements of the list and use only the remaining ones to build up the result. This is known as conditional augmentation.

    • For example, in EXTRACT-SYMBOLS, only elements that are symbols will be included in the result.

      (defun extract-symbols (x)

      (cond ((null x) nil)

      ((symbolp (first x))

      (cons (first x)

      (extract-symbols (rest x))))

      (t (extract-symbols (rest x)))))


Exercises2

EXERCISES

  • Write the function SUM-NUMERIC-ELEMENTS, which adds up all the numbers in a list and ignores the non-numbers. (SUM- NUMERICELEMENTS ’(3 BEARS 3 BOWLS AND 1 GIRL)) should return seven.


Exercises3

EXERCISES

  • Please write the following functions:

    (1) RECTANGLE(N M) which can print NXM starts forming a rectangle.

    For example: RECTANGLE(5 3)

    Output : *****

    *****

    *****

    (2) TRIANGLE1(N) which can print starts forming a triangle as follows.

    For example: TRIANGLE1(5)

    Output : *

    **

    ***

    ****

    *****


Exercises4

EXERCISES

(3) TRIANGLE2(N) which can print starts forming a triangle as follows.

For example: TRIANGLE2(5)

Output : *

* *

* * *

* * * *

* * * * *


Exercises5

EXERCISES

(setf family

‘((colin nil nil)

(deirdre nil nil)

(arthur nil nil)

(kate nil nil)

(frank nil nil)

(linda nil nil)

(suzannecolindeirdre)

(brucearthurkate)

(charlesarthurkate)

(david arthurkate)

(ellenarthurkate)

(george frank linda)

(hillary frank linda)

(andre nil nil)

(tamarabrucesuzanne)

(vincentbrucesuzanne)

(wanda nil nil)

(ivangeorgeellen)

(juliegeorgeellen)

(mariegeorgeellen)

(nigelandrehillary)

(frederick nil tamara)

(zeldavincentwanda)

(joshuaivanwanda)

(quentin nil nil)

(robertquentinjulie)

(olivianigelmarie)

(peter nigelmarie)

(erica nil nil)

(yvetterobertzelda)

(diane peter erica)))


Exercises6

EXERCISES

  • Each person in the database is represented by an entry of form

    (name father mother)

    When someone’s father or mother is unknown, a value of NIL is used.

    a. Write the functions FATHER,MOTHER,PARENTS, and CHILDREN that return a person’s father, mother, a list of his or her known parents, and a list of his or her children, respectively.

    For example:

    • (FATHER ’SUZANNE) should return COLIN.

    • (PARENTS ’SUZANNE) should return (COLIN DEIRDRE).

    • (PARENTS ’FREDERICK) should return (TAMARA), since Frederick’s father is unknown.

    • (CHILDREN ’ARTHUR) should return the set (BRUCE CHARLES DAVID ELLEN).

      If any of these functions is given NIL as input, it should return NIL. This feature will be useful later when we write some recursive functions.


Exercises7

EXERCISES

b. Write SIBLINGS, a function that returns a list of a person’s siblings (兄弟姊妹), including genetic half-siblings.

For examples:

  • (SIBLINGS ’BRUCE) should return (CHARLES DAVID ELLEN).

  • (SIBLINGS ’ZELDA) should return (JOSHUA).

    c. Write MAPUNION, an applicative operator that takes a function and a list as input, applies the function to every element of the list, and computes the union of all the results.

    An example:

  • (MAPUNION #’REST ’((1 A B C) (2 E C J) (3 F A B C D))), which should return the set (A B C E J F D).

    Hint: MAPUNION can be defined as a combination of two applicative operators you already know.


Exercises8

EXERCISES

d. Write GRANDPARENTS, a function that returns the set of a person’s grandparents. Use MAPUNION in your solution.

e. Write COUSINS, a function that returns the set of a person’s genetically related first cousins (堂(或表)兄弟; 堂(或表)姐妹), in other words, the children of any of their parents’ siblings. Use MAPUNION in your solution.

For example:

  • (COUSINS ’JULIE) should return the set (TAMARA VINCENT NIGEL).

    f. Write the two-input recursive predicate DESCENDED-FROM that returns a true value if the first person is descended (傳下來) from the second.

    For example:

  • (DESCENDED-FROM ’TAMARA ’ARTHUR) should return T.

  • (DESCENDED-FROM ’TAMARA ’LINDA) should return NIL.

    (Hint: You are descended from someone if he is one of your parents, or if either your father or mother is descended from him. This is a recursive definition.)


Exercises9

EXERCISES

g. Write the recursive function ANCESTORS that returns a person’s set of ancestors(祖先).

For example:

  • (ANCESTORS ’MARIE) should return the set (ELLEN ARTHUR KATE GEORGE FRANK LINDA).

    (Hint: A person’s ancestors are his parents plus his parents’ ancestors. This is a recursive definition.)

    h. Write the recursive function GENERATION-GAP that returns the number of generations separating a person and one of his or her ancestors.

    For examples:

  • (GENERATION-GAP ’SUZANNE ’COLIN) should return one.

  • (GENERATION-GAP ’FREDERICK ’COLIN) should return three.

  • (GENERATION-GAP ’FREDERICK ’LINDA) should return NIL, because Linda is not an ancestor of Frederick.


Exercises10

EXERCISES

i.Use the functions you have written to answer the followingquestions:

1. Is Robert descended from Deirdre?

2. Who are Yvette’s ancestors?

3. What is the generation gap between Olivia and Frank?

4. Who are Peter’s cousins?

5. Who are Olivia’s grandparents?


Trees and car cdr recursion

TREES AND CAR/CDR RECURSION

  • CAR/CDR Recursion

    • Template:

      (DEFUN func (X)

      (COND (end-test-1 end-value-1)

      (end-test-2 end-value-2)

      (T (combiner (func (CAR X))

      (func (CDR X))))))

    • Example 1: tree searching

      (defun find-number (x)

      (cond ((numberp x) x)

      ((atom x) nil)

      (t (or (find-number (car x))

      (find-number (cdr x))))))


Trees and car cdr recursion1

TREES AND CAR/CDR RECURSION

  • (((GOLDILOCKS . AND)) (THE . 3) BEARS)


Trees and car cdr recursion2

TREES AND CAR/CDR RECURSION

[7]> (find-number '(((GOLDILOCKS . AND)) (THE . 3) BEARS))

1. Trace: (FIND-NUMBER '(((GOLDILOCKS . AND)) (THE . 3) BEARS))

2. Trace: (FIND-NUMBER '((GOLDILOCKS . AND)))

3. Trace: (FIND-NUMBER '(GOLDILOCKS . AND))

4. Trace: (FIND-NUMBER 'GOLDILOCKS)

4. Trace: FIND-NUMBER ==> NIL

4. Trace: (FIND-NUMBER 'AND)

4. Trace: FIND-NUMBER ==> NIL

3. Trace: FIND-NUMBER ==> NIL

3. Trace: (FIND-NUMBER 'NIL)

3. Trace: FIND-NUMBER ==> NIL

2. Trace: FIND-NUMBER ==> NIL

2. Trace: (FIND-NUMBER '((THE . 3) BEARS))

3. Trace: (FIND-NUMBER '(THE . 3))

4. Trace: (FIND-NUMBER 'THE)

4. Trace: FIND-NUMBER ==> NIL

4. Trace: (FIND-NUMBER '3)

4. Trace: FIND-NUMBER ==> 3

3. Trace: FIND-NUMBER ==> 3

2. Trace: FIND-NUMBER ==> 3

1. Trace: FIND-NUMBER ==> 3

3


Trees and car cdr recursion3

TREES AND CAR/CDR RECURSION

  • Example 2: to build trees by using CONS as the combiner

    (defun atoms-to-q (x)

    (cond ((null x) nil)

    ((atom x) ’q)

    (t (cons (atoms-to-q (car x))

    (atoms-to-q (cdr x))))))

    > (atoms-to-q ’(a . b))

    (Q . Q)

    > (atoms-to-q ’(hark (harold the angel) sings))

    (Q (Q Q Q) Q)

    Please draw the trees.


Exercises11

EXERCISES

  • Write a function COUNT-ATOMS that returns the number of atoms in a tree. (COUNT-ATOMS ’(A (B) C)) should return five, since in addition to A, B, and C there are two NILs in the tree.

  • Write a function SUM-TREE that returns the sum of all the numbers appearing in a tree. Non-numbers should be ignored. (SUM-TREE ’((3 BEARS) (3 BOWLS) (1 GIRL))) should return seven.

  • Write FLATTEN, a function that returns all the elements of an arbitrarily nested list in a single-level list. (FLATTEN ’((A B (R)) A C (A D ((A (B)) R) A))) should return (A B R A C A D A B R A).


Using helping functions

USING HELPING FUNCTIONS

  • For some problems it is useful to structure the solution as ahelping function plus arecursive function.

  • The helping function is the one that you call from top level; it performs some special service either at the beginning or the end of the recursion.

  • For example, suppose we want to write a function COUNT-UP that counts from one up to n:

    (count-up 5) (1 2 3 4 5)

    (count-up 0) nil

  • This problem is harder than COUNT-DOWN because the innermost recursive call must terminate the recursion when the input reaches five (in the preceding example), not zero.


Using helping functions1

USING HELPING FUNCTIONS

(defun count-up (n) ;the helping function

(count-up-recursively 1 n))

(defun count-up-recursively (cnt n) ; the recursive function

(cond ((> cnt n) nil)

(t (cons cnt

(count-up-recursively

(+ cnt 1) n)))))

Break 4 [14]> (count-up 5)

(1 2 3 4 5)

Break 4 [14]> (count-up 15)

(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15)

Break 5 [15]> (count-up 5)

1. Trace: (COUNT-UP '5)

2. Trace: (COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY '1 '5)

3. Trace: (COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY '2 '5)

4. Trace: (COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY '3 '5)

5. Trace: (COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY '4 '5)

6. Trace: (COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY '5 '5)

7. Trace: (COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY '6 '5)

7. Trace: COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY ==> NIL

6. Trace: COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY ==> (5)

5. Trace: COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY ==> (4 5)

4. Trace: COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY ==> (3 4 5)

3. Trace: COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY ==> (2 3 4 5)

2. Trace: COUNT-UP-RECURSIVELY ==> (1 2 3 4 5)

1. Trace: COUNT-UP ==> (1 2 3 4 5)

(1 2 3 4 5)


Exercises12

EXERCISES

  • Write a recursive function BURY that buries an item under n levels of parentheses. (BURY ’FRED 2) should return ((FRED)), while (BURY ’FRED 5) should return (((((FRED))))).

  • Write PAIRINGS, a function that pairs the elements of two lists. (PAIRINGS ’(A B C) ’(1 2 3)) should return ((A 1) (B 2) (C 3)). You may assume that the two lists will be of equal length.

  • Write a recursive function HUGE that raises a number to its own power. (HUGE 2) should return 22, (HUGE 3) should return 33 = 27, (HUGE 4) should return 44 = 256, and so on. Do not use REDUCE.


Exercises13

EXERCISES

  • Write EVERY-OTHER, a recursive function that returns every other element of a list—the first, third, fifth, and so on. (EVERY-OTHER ’(A B C D E F G)) should return (A C E G). (EVERY-OTHER ’(I CAME I SAW I CONQUERED)) should return (I I I).

  • Write LEFT-HALF, a recursive function in two parts that returns the first n/2 elements of a list of length n. Write your function so that the list does not have to be of even length. (LEFT-HALF ’(A B C D E)) should return (A B C). (LEFT-HALF ’(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8)) should return (1 2 3 4). You may use LENGTH but not REVERSE in your definition.

  • Write MERGE-LISTS, a function that takes two lists of numbers, each in increasing order, as input. The function should return a list that is a merger of the elements in its inputs, in order. (MERGE-LISTS ’(1 2 6 8 10 12) ’(2 3 5 9 13)) should return (1 2 2 3 5 6 8 9 10 12 13).


Exercises14

EXERCISES

  • Part of any tic-tac-toe playing program is a function to display the board. Write a function PRINT-BOARD that takes a list of nine elements as input. Each element will be an X, an O, or NIL. PRINTBOARD should display the corresponding board. For example, (PRINT-BOARD ’(X O O NIL X NIL O NIL X)) should print:

    X | O | O

    ---------------

    | X |

    ---------------

    O | | X


The read function

THE READ FUNCTION

  • READ is a function that reads one Lisp object (a number, symbol, list, or whatever) from the keyboard and returns that object as its value.

    (defun my-square ()

    (format t "Please type in a number: ")

    (let ((x (read)))

    (format t "The number ~S squared is ~S.~%"

    x (* x x))))

    > (my-square)

    Please type in a number: 7

    The number 7 squared is 49.

    NIL

    > (my-square)

    Please type in a number: -4

    The number -4 squared is 16.

    NIL


Exercises15

EXERCISES

  • The COOKIE-MONSTER function keeps reading data from the terminal until it reads the symbol COOKIE. Write COOKIE-MONSTER. Here is a sample interaction:

    > (cookie-monster)

    Give me cookie!!!

    Cookie? rock

    No want ROCK...

    Give me cookie!!!

    Cookie? hairbrush

    No want HAIRBRUSH...

    Give me cookie!!!

    Cookie? cookie

    Thank you!...Munch munch munch...BURP

    NIL


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