Point of view
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 12

Point-of-view PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 38 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Point-of-view. Review. 1 st person P- o -V: The narrator is a character in the story. Uses pronouns like, “I,” “me,” “my.”. 3 rd person P- o -V: The narrator is outside of the story. Uses pronouns like, “he,” “she,” “him,” “her,” “they.”. Key Idea.

Download Presentation

Point-of-view

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Point of view

Point-of-view


Review

Review

  • 1st person P-o-V: The narrator is a character in the story.

  • Uses pronouns like, “I,” “me,” “my.”

  • 3rd person P-o-V: The narrator is outside of the story.

  • Uses pronouns like, “he,” “she,” “him,” “her,” “they.”


Key idea

Key Idea

  • The point-of-view restricts the amount of information you get as a reader.

  • Example:

  • In first person, you learn what happens as the character experiences it. You view it from only their eyes.


Example

Example

Mrs. Price says loud and in front of everybody, “now, Rachel, that’s enough,” because she sees I’ve shoved the red sweater to the tippy-tip corner of my desk and it’s hanging all over the edge like a waterfall, but I don’t care.

“Rachel,” Mrs. Price says. She says it like she’s getting mad. “You put that sweater on right now and no more nonsense.”

“But it’s not—”

“Now!” Mrs. Price says.

  • What impression of Mrs. Price does Rachel give the reader?


Example1

Example

But the worst part is right before the bell rings for lunch. That stupid Phyllis Lopez, who is even dumber than Sylvia Saldivar, says she remembers the red sweater is hers! I take it off right away and give it to her.

  • How does first- person point of view affect what you know about Sylvia and Phyllis?


Why do authors choose first person or third person

Why do authors choose first person or third person?


First person

First person

Advantages

Disadvantages

  • Allows for a personal, engaging voice

  • Helps readers connect to the main character

  • Great for emotional topics or stories without much action

  • Difficult to describe the main character

  • You don’t know the other characters’ motivations

  • The reader can’t “see” anything the narrator doesn’t witness


Third person

Third person

Advantages

Disadvantages

  • More objective

  • Narrator can cover all the characters

  • Helps readers get in on the action

  • Good for complex storylines with many subplots

  • Less personal

  • May lack character development because it focuses on action

  • It can become confusing to the reader if too much “head hopping” occurs


Two forms of 3 rd person

two forms of 3rd person


Third person1

third person

Limited

Omniscient

  • Narrator only sees the thoughts of one character.

  • Narrator sees the thoughts and actions of all characters.


Switch the point of view

Switch the Point of View

  • The train whistle blared. I swallowed and looked down the tracks. “We’ve got to get this car moved!” I screamed.

  • He heard a creak on the staircase. His eyes popped open and he held his breath, listening for another sound. The house stayed silent. Relaxing, Charlie closed his eyes. He heard it again.


Point of view

1st 3rd

3rd 1st

Around town, the vote wasn’t even close. Everyone wanted Moose to carry the ball.

“Look, son,” Coach Williams said to the Moose on the practice field the Thursday before the Benton Heights game, “this has gone far enough. Fun is fun. A joke is a joke. But let’s drop it.”

“Just once,” the Moose pleaded.

Coach Williams looked at the Moose and didn’t answer.

The Moose didn’t know what that meant.

Mrs. Price says loud and in front of everybody, “Now, Rachel, that’s enough,” because she sees I’ve shoved the red sweater to the tippy-tip corner of my desk and it’s hanging all over the edge like a waterfall, but I don’t care.

“Rachel,” Mrs. Price says. She says it like she’s getting mad. “You put that sweater on right now and no more nonsense.”

“But it’s not—”

“Now!” Mrs. Price says.


  • Login