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Absolute Monarchy. Chapter 13. Two Models of Political Development. CONSTITUTIONAL MONARCHY Government where the monarch is subject to the law and power is limited England: Representative Body of the People vs. power of the king Limiting the kings power 1215-Magna Carta 1300’s-Parliament

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Absolute monarchy

Absolute Monarchy

Chapter 13


Two models of political development
Two Models of Political Development

  • CONSTITUTIONAL MONARCHY

    • Government where the monarch is subject to the law and power is limited

      • England: Representative Body of the People vs. power of the king

        • Limiting the kings power

          • 1215-Magna Carta

          • 1300’s-Parliament

          • 1640’s-Petition of Right

          • 1690’s-English Bill of Rights

        • Major Conflict

          • English Civil War (Puritans)

          • Glorious Revolution

  • ABSOLUTE MONARCHY

    • Government where the monarch controls the government, the economy, and society

      • Divine Right to rule

      • Personal Rule


Louis xiv
Louis XIV

  • History

    • France ruled by strong ministers

      • Richelieu and Mazarin

        • Created centralizing policies that provoked rebellions by the nobility (the Fronde) 1649-1652

          • Remember the relationship between the Huguenots and the nobility

        • Louis worried about heavy-handed practices

          • Centralized power while assuring local control and influence for the nobility


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Louis XIV

  • Divine right to rule

    • Leader divinely appointed and answerable only to God

      • Louis’ tutor was Political theorist Bishop Jacques-Benign Bousset

        • Old testament rulers divinely appointed and answerable only to God

        • Medieval Church: only God could judge a Pope; extended this for the king

    • “L’etal, céstmoi” (I am the State)—Louis XIV

      • The king still duty bound to reflect God’s will through his policies; not bound to nobles or Parlements (courts)

      • Representative of the State in foreign affairs

        • Not the father of his people; that was left to local nobility


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Louis XIV

  • Personal Rule

    • Assumed control 1661

      • 21 years old

    • Relationship with nobility

    • Directly managed political affairs

      • Councils

      • Parlements

    • Social Control

      • Versailles


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Louis XIV

  • Foreign Policy: Early Wars

    • Securing French borders

      • War of Devolution

      • 1667 Invasion of Flanders

      • 1670 Secret Treaty of Dover

      • 1672 Invasion of the Netherlands

      • 1678, 1679 Peace of Nijmwegen


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Louis XIV

  • Religious Policy

    • To secure political unity and stability

      • Suppression of Jansenists

      • Revocation of Edict of Nantes


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Louis XIV

  • Later Wars

    • Nine Years War and the League of Augsburg

    • New World

    • War of Spanish Succession


Louis xiv6
Louis XIV

  • France after Louis XIV

    • Louis XV

    • Duke of Orleans

    • John Law

      • Mississippi Bubble

      • Renewal of Authority of Parlements


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