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Understanding By Design An Introduction. Developing Standards-based Curriculum. The Problem. “Even good students don’t always display a deep understanding of what is taught even when conventional tests certify success.” (Wiggins & McTighe). Stating a Concept vs. Developing a Concept.

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Understanding By Design An Introduction

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Understanding By DesignAn Introduction

Developing Standards-based Curriculum


The Problem

  • “Even good students don’t always display a deep understanding of what is taught even when conventional tests certify success.”

    (Wiggins & McTighe)


Stating a Concept vs. Developing a Concept


Seatwork Time Spent in Three Kinds of Tasks


The Question

  • So, the question is:

    • “How does your class contribute to academic achievement in your school?”

  • Develop curricula that makes a difference


Curriculum is a Means to an End

  • Focus on a topic that matters

  • Use methods that engage

  • Cause deep and enduring learning related to an important standard/topic

    • Is it important enough to remember when the student is 30 years old?


What is Backward Design

  • BD Begins with the end in mind

    • Starting with a clear understanding of the destination

    • Making sure that you are moving in the right direction

    • Is justifiable and reliable


Unfortunately, Many Teachers:

  • Begin with a favored lesson, time-honored activities (or the next page in the text)

  • Backwards design starts with the end (the desired results).


Backwards Design

  • We begin BD with the following question:

    • What would I accept as evidence that students have attained the desired understandings/abilities?


The Backward Design Process

Stages in the Backward Design Process

Identify desired results.

Determine acceptable evidence

Plan learning experiences and instruction


STAGE ONE

Identify Desired Results


STAGE ONE: Backward Design


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Worth being familiar with

Important to know and do

“Enduring understanding”

Establishing Curricular Priorities


  • Represents a big idea having enduring value beyond the classroom

  • Reside at the heart of the discipline (involve “doing” the subject).

  • Require uncoverage (abstract or often misunderstood ideas).

  • Offer potential for engaging students.

“Enduring” understanding

Determining Worthiness

Four Filters


STAGE TWO

Determine Acceptable Evidence


STAGE TWO: Backward Design


Assessment Types

Traditional quizzes and tests

Paper/pencil

Selected-response

Constructed response

Performance tasks and projects

Open-ended

Complex

Authentic

Worth being familiar with

Important to know and do

“Enduring understanding”

Curricular Priorities and Assessments


Thinking Like an Assessor

  • Does not come naturally to most teachers

  • We unconsciously jump to the activity once we have a target

  • Backwards design demands that we short-circuit the natural instinct that leads most to developing the activity first


STAGE THREE

Plan Learning

Experiences/Instruction


STAGE THREE: Backward Design


KEY QUESTIONS: Instructional Design

  • What facts, concepts, principles and skills will students need to achieve in lessons?

  • What activities will equip students with needed knowledge/skills?

  • What materials/resources are available?


How Will You:

  • Bring abstract ideas and far-away facts to life?

Students must see knowledge and skill as building blocks—not just isolated lessons


Wisdom Can’t be Told!

  • Understanding is more stimulated than learned

  • It grows from questioning oneself and being questioned by others

  • Students must figure things out, not simply wait to be told!

    • This requires the teacher to alter their curriculum and teaching style


More LearningThroughLess Teaching


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