Iii vocabulary list 2
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 64

III - Vocabulary List 2 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 52 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

III - Vocabulary List 2. Abdicate – v - to renounce or relinquish a throne, right, power, claim, responsibility, or the like, especially in a formal manner Bigot – n - a person who is obstinately or intolerantly devoted to his or her own opinions and prejudices

Download Presentation

III - Vocabulary List 2

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Iii vocabulary list 2

III - Vocabulary List 2

  • Abdicate – v - to renounce or relinquish a throne, right, power, claim, responsibility, or the like, especially in a formal manner

  • Bigot – n - a person who is obstinately or intolerantly devoted to his or her own opinions and prejudices

  • Candid – adj - free from reservation, disguise, or subterfuge; straightforward

  • Desolate – adj - deprived or destitute of inhabitants; deserted; uninhabited

  • Ebullient – adj - overflowing with fervor, enthusiasm, or excitement; high-spirited

  • Flaccid - adj - soft and limp; not firm; flabby

  • Gibe – v - To make taunting, heckling, or jeering remarks; to jibe

  • Harangue – v - a scolding with a long or intense verbal attack; diatribe

  • Incongruous – adj - Lacking in harmony; incompatible:Not in agreement

  • Jaded – adj - made dull, apathetic, or cynical by experience; worn out, wearied


Sentences and non sentences

Sentences and Non-Sentences


A sentence tells a complete idea a fragment non sentence tells an incomplete idea

- A sentence tells a complete idea.- A fragment (non-sentence) tells an incomplete idea.

  • Read each of the following statements and decide which is a complete sentence.


Sharks are fierce hunters

Sharks are fierce hunters.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


Afraid of sharks

Afraid of sharks.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


The great white shark will attack people

The great white shark will attack people.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


Other kinds will not

Other kinds will not.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


Sharks have an outer row of teeth for grabbing

Sharks have an outer row of teeth for grabbing.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


When the outer teeth fall out another row of teeth moves up

When the outer teeth fall out, another row of teeth moves up.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


Help keep the ocean clean by eating dead animals

Help keep the ocean clean by eating dead animals.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment

That’s good to know!


Not a single bone in his body

Not a single bone in his body.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


Cartilage of sharks

Cartilage of sharks.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


Made of the same material as the tip of your nose

Made of the same material as the tip of your nose.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


Unlike other fish sharks cannot float

Unlike other fish, sharks cannot float.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


In motion constantly

In motion constantly.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


Even when sleeping

Even when sleeping.

  • Sentence

  • Fragment


Clause

Clause

  • Group of words containing a subject and a verb

    • Independent

    • Dependent


Independent clause main clause

Independent Clause“main clause”

  • A group of words made up of a subject and predicate

  • Simple sentence

  • Can stand alone as a sentence

  • Ex. Jim studied in the Sweet Shop for his English quiz.


Dependent clause subordinate clause

Dependent Clause“subordinate clause”

  • Contains a subject and verb but does not express a complete thought

  • Cannot stand alone as a sentence

  • Must be attached to an independent clause

  • Ex: When Jim studied in the Sweet Shop for his English quiz


Grammar practice

Grammar Practice

  • Write 2 SENTENCES.

    • Reminder: These are COMPLETE thoughts

      • independent (main) clauses

  • Write 2 dependent clauses.

    • contains a subject & verb

  • You have 5 minutes 


The vicious run on sentence

The Vicious Run-on Sentence

…and how to tame it.


Run on sentence

Run-on Sentence

  • Has at least 2 parts

  • Either part can stand alone

    • 2 independent clauses improperly combined

    • The sun is high, put on some sunscreen.


How to combine a run on

How to Combine a Run-on

  • Comma + coordinating conjunction (FANBOYS)

    • The sun is high, so put on sunscreen.

  • F

  • A

  • N

  • B

  • O

  • Y

  • S


Fanboys practice

FANBOYS Practice

  • Correctly combine 2+ independent clauses using 3 different FANBOYS.

  • You have 8 minutes 


Pain free guide to semi colons

Pain-Free Guide to Semi-colons


Ok so what does a semi colon do

Ok, so what does a semi-colon do?

  • Links 2 independent clauses (2 complete thoughts) with no additional words


Examples

Examples

  • I am going home; I intend to stay there.

  • It rained heavily during the afternoon; we managed to have our picnic anyway.

  • They couldn't make it to the summit and back before dark; they decided to camp for the night.


What else can it do

What else can it do?

  • join 2 independent clauses together with a conjunctive adverb (adverbs that join independent clauses):

    • however

    • moreover

    • therefore

    • consequently

    • otherwise

    • nevertheless

    • thus


More examples

More Examples

  • I am going home; moreover, I intend to stay there.

  • It rained heavily during the afternoon; however, we managed to have our picnic anyway.

  • They couldn't make it to the summit and back before dark; therefore, they decided to camp for the night.


Correct or incorrect

Correct or Incorrect?

  • I felt sleepy after school; I took a nap on the couch.

  • The prom is next month; but I don’t have a date yet.

  • I love pizza; wings; chocolate; and burgers.

  • Washington Irving is a Romantic author; however, Nathaniel Hawthorne is a Dark Romantic.

  • I failed English; consequently, my parents grounded me.


Semi colon practice

Semi-Colon Practice

  • Write 3 sentences correctly combining 2+ independent clauses with a semi-colon and NO additional words.

  • Write 3 sentences correctly combining 2+ independent clauses using a conjunctive adverb.

    You have 11 minutes 


Sentence combining

Sentence Combining


Semi colon formulas

Semi-colon Formulas

  • main clause + ; + conjunctive adverb + , + main clause.

    • I love dogs; however, I like cats too.

  • main clause+ ;+ main clause.

    • I love my cat; his name is Jack.


Common conjunctive adverbs

Common Conjunctive Adverbs

  • accordinglyalsobesidesconsequentlyconverselyfinallyfurthermorehence howeverindeedinsteadlikewise

  • meanwhilemoreoverneverthelessnext nonethelessotherwisesimilarlystillsubsequentlythenthereforethus


Not to be confused with coordinating conjunctions

NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITHCoordinating Conjunctions

  • Main clause+ , + FANBOYS + main clause.

    • I love my dog, and I love my cat.

  • For

  • And

  • Nor

  • But

  • Or

  • Yet

  • So


Corrections

Corrections

Correct each of the following sentences 3x.

  • Using JUST a semi-colon

  • Using the semi-colon, conjunctive adverb, comma construction

  • Using a comma and FANBOYS

  • I am sleepy I want to take a nap.

  • My dog ran away I cried myself to sleep.

  • This weekend is Halloween my costume is awesome.


The fab four

The Fab Four

Types of Sentences


Types of sentences

Types of Sentences

  • Simple

  • Complex

  • Compound

  • Compound-complex


Simple

Simple

  • Has 1 independent (stand alone) clause

  • Ex. David Letterman and Jay Leno host talk shows.


Compound

Compound

  • Consists of 2+ independent clauses.

  • The independent clauses can be joined with

    • , + A coordinating conjunction:

      • for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so (FANBOYS)

    • A semicolon (;)

  • Ex. Amir is a coward, but Hassan is brave.


Complex

Complex

  • Contains 1 independent clause and 1+ dependent clause

  • Ideas are linked by subordinating conjunctions

    • after,how, until,although,if, unless,as, in order, that,whenas long as, whenever,as much as, now, where,as soon as,wherever,though, since,while,before, even, though, because

  • Ex. Although I love the mountains, I prefer the beach.


Compound complex

Compound-Complex

  • Has 2+ independent clauses and 1+ dependent clausesEx. When the heat comes, the lakes dry up, and farmers know the crops will fail.

    I planned to drive to work, but I couldn't until the mechanic repaired my car.


Grammar practice1

Grammar Practice

  • Write 8 sentences:

    • 2 simple

    • 2 compound

    • 2 complex

    • 2 compound-complex

      You have 12 minutes 


Sentence types

Sentence Types

Structure


Four sentence types

Four sentence types

  • Declarative: makes a statement, ends with a period.

    • English is fascinating.

  • Imperative: makes a command, ends with a period.

    • Go study for your vocabulary quiz.

  • Exclamatory: expresses a strong feeling and is followed with an exclamation point!

    • I’m failing English!

  • Interrogative: asks a question and ends with a question mark?

    • Will you help me with my English homework?


Sentence type practice

Sentence Type Practice

  • Write a declarative, imperative, interrogative, and exclamatory sentence about The Kite Runner.

    • Bonus: use vocabulary words in the sentences!


Sentence type review

Sentence Type Review

  • Will Amir ever redeem himself?

  • Hassan is a loyal boy.

  • Leave us alone, agha.

  • We won!


Sentence types1

Sentence Types

Length


Sentence length variety

Sentence Length Variety

Telegraphic: 5 or fewer words

Short: approximately 10 words

Medium: approximately 18 words

Long and Involved: 30 words or more


Count poe s sentences

Count Poe’s Sentences

I was never kinder to the old man than during the whole week before I killed him. And every night, about midnight, I turned the latch of his door and opened it--oh, so gently! And then, when I had made an opening sufficient for my head, I put in a dark lantern, all closed, closed, so that no light shone out, and then I thrust in my head. Oh, you would have laughed to see how cunningly I thrust it in! I moved it slowly--very, very slowly, so that I might not disturb the old man's sleep. It took me an hour to place my whole head within the opening so far that I could see him as he lay upon his bed. Ha!--would a madman have been so wise as this?

From: “The Tell-Tale Heart”


Poe s sentence variety

Poe’s Sentence Variety

Telegraphic:

Short:

Medium:

Long and Involved:

**Longer sentences provide better description.

Show, Don’t Tell!!****


J k rowling excerpt

J.K. Rowling Excerpt

Nearly ten years had passed since the Dursleys had woken up to find their nephew on the front step, but Privet Drive had hardly changed at all. The sun rose on the same tidy front gardens and lit up the brass number four on the Dursleys' front door; it crept into their living room, which was almost exactly the same as it had been on the night when Mr. Dursley had seen that fateful news report about the owls. Only the photographs on the mantelpiece really showed how much time had passed. Ten years ago, there had been lots of pictures of what looked like a large pink beach ball wearing different-colored bonnets--but Dudley Dursley was no longer a baby, and now the photographs showed a large blond boy riding his first bicycle, on a carousel at the fair, playing a computer game with his father, being hugged and kissed by his mother. The room held no sign at all that another boy lived in the house, too.

From: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone


Rowling s sentence variety

Rowling’s Sentence Variety

Telegraphic:

Short:

Medium:

Long and Involved:

**Longer sentences provide better description.

Show, Don’t Tell!!****


Sentence length practice

Sentence Length Practice

  • Write a Telegraphic, Short, Medium, and Long & Involved Sentence about Love & Sacrifice and what you have learned in this unit.

    • Bonus: incorporate vocabulary terms!


Variety

Variety

  • You should have at least 3 different sentence lengths in a body paragraph.

    • Combine simple sentences to make compound or complex sentences.

    • Length helps maintain the reader’s interest.

      • Include some telegraphic, or short, sentences for emphasis.


Grammar review

Grammar Review

  • Write a compound-complex sentence using at least two vocabulary words.

    • Identify the clauses in each sentence, then

    • Identify all subjects and verbs

    • Identify any prepositional and/or verbal phrases.


Sentence variety

Sentence Variety

Beginnings


Sentence beginnings

Sentence Beginnings

  • SUBJECT-VERB – I shot the sheriff.

  • SUBORDINATE (DEPENDENT) CLAUSE - After I won the Super Bowl, I went to Disney World.

  • PREPOSITIONAL PHRASE - At the beginning of time, there was a void.


Sentence beginnings review

Sentence Beginnings Review

  • Screaming loudly, my mother grounded me.

  • After I worked out, I took a shower.

  • My mom baked cookies.

  • To hold the door for you is the least I could do.

  • In the woods, there are fairies.

  • Luckily, I remembered to study for the test.


More sentence beginnings

More Sentence Beginnings

  • INFINITIVE – To be a man must be the epitome of existence.

  • VERBAL – Spinning wildly, she flung herself off the stage.

  • ADVERB – Unfortunately, the opposite was true as well.


Sentence variety in essays

Sentence Variety in Essays

  • Underline the first five words of each sentence in red.

  • (Place parenthesis around simple sentences in green.)

  • Count the number of words in each sentence and place the number in blue over the last word of the sentence.

  • Highlight any sentences that are exclamatory or interrogative.


Variety1

Variety

  • You should have at least 3 types of sentence beginnings in a body paragraph.

    • Combine simple sentences to make compound or complex sentences.

    • Length helps maintain the reader’s interest.

      • Include some telegraphic, or short, sentences for emphasis.

    • When writing a speech include multiple exclamatory and interrogative sentences; if not writing a speech, keep them to a minimum.


Journal entry 9

Journal Entry #9

“All wars are civil wars, because all men are brothers. “

- Francois Fenelon

Write a 6-8 sentence paragraph.

  • Define WAR in your own words.

    • Try to create a 3-part definition (term, classification, defining characteristics)

  • Discuss a personal example (a war can represent an internal struggle).

  • Discuss a historical or cultural example.

  • Discuss a fictional example from a book or film.


  • Login