Confederation
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Confederation. By: Stephanie, K rista and Giulia . Who was Georges Etienne Cartier?. Georges was born September 6 th 1814, died May 20 th 1873.

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Confederation

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Confederation

Confederation

By: Stephanie, Krista and Giulia


Georges etienne cartier

Who was Georges Etienne Cartier?

Georges was born September 6th 1814, died May 20th 1873.

Georges was a French Canadian statesman. We know a statesman as a politician. He was for confederation and was known as one of the fathers of confederation. He was also co-premier of Canada. He and John A Macdonald worked together to make confederation happen. They were a very powerful alliance. They were two of the leading fathers of confederation.

Georges Etienne Cartier


Georges etienne cartier1

How did Georges get involved in confederation?

Georges became active in politics in 1848 when he was first elected as a member of the province of Canada’s assembly. He later became a leader of the political party called the parti bleu that joined with the conservative party of upper Canada. He was in favour of French speaking Canadians. He took place in the Charlottetown, Quebec and London conferences and was one of the strongest supporters of confederation. Georges was one of the most influential politicians of his generation.

Why did Etienne Cartier want confederation?

It made sense to join with the new nation being formed because some French speaking Canadians wanted to join with the rest of Canada instead of standing alone. A big reason why he was for confederation was because his fear of American expansion.

Georges Etienne Cartier


A a dorion

Who was A.A Dorion?

A.A Dorion was French Canadian, Politician and Jurist( a judge). He was born January 17th, 1818 and died May 31st, 1891. He was a member of the legislative assembly of the province of Canada. He was the leading member of the parti rouge. He was a supporter of reciprocity (free trade) with the United States. He was co-premier of the province of Canada.

A.A Dorion


A a dorion1

How did A.A Dorion become involved in Confederation?

A.A Dorionopposed the fact that the parti bleu was for confederation. The parti rouge did not like the idea of confederation. He attended the Quebec conference but went against the confederation project. He published a speech against confederation in several newspapers.

Why didn’t A.A Dorion want confederation.

He thought the provinces would loose their power if confederation was put into action. He disapproved that the colonies of New Brunswick, Nova scotia and prince Edward island were uniting under one government. He also wanted to keep the tradition of French Canada strong.

A.A Dorion


Confederation1

What was confederation?

The Canadian Confederation was the process by which the Federal Dominion of Canada was formed on July 1st, 1869 . On that day, the existing province of Canada was divided into the new provinces of Ontario and Quebec, and New Brunswick and Nova Scotia also became provinces of the dominion of Canada.

Confederation


Confederation2

Who were the fathers of confederation?

The fathers of confederation are usually considered men representing the British colonies in North America. They at least must have attended one of the three major conferences on Canadian confederation.

-the Charlottetown conference in 1864

-the Quebec conference in 1864

-the London conference in 1866-1867

Confederation


Confederation3

Why did confederation start?

Nobody really started confederation themselves. There were three main reasons that caused confederation to start. They were the economic causes, social causes and political causes.

-Economic causes were started by people who believed in mercantilism which was an economic system based on colonialism and that the home country have the right to bring raw materials from colonies and back in order to make for good citizens.

Confederation


Confederation4

Social Causes

People in Canada did not like the current government. This is because people in Canada thought they were in danger from the Americans. The French did not like the government because they thought the government might take away their culture.

Political Causes

Confederation

Generally, fathers of confederation led the political groups in each of the colonies. For example John A Macdonald led the Tories conservatives in Canada west.


Confederation quebec

  • Where did the Confederation begin?

  • Confederation began in Prince Edward Island.

  • When did Confederation begin?

  • Confederation began on July 1st, 1867.

  • Why did Quebec join the Confederation?

  • Quebec wasn`t ready to give up its independence and be controlled by Canada West (had the largest population). During Quebec Conference were proposed 72 resolutions that included the division of the power, members of the House of Commons would be elected by male voters (owners of the land) and would have 24 senators, the Central Government's would take over the debts of the provinces and railway would be built. All these resolutions made Cartier force Quebec join the Confederation.

Confederation/Quebec


Quebec

How was Quebec after joined the Confederation?

Quebec`s population nearly doubled and the large wave of immigrants ended around 1870. Quebec also experienced strong economy growth and industrialization and urbanization continued.

Quebec


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