Conceptual frameworks backward mapping what is it why do it how to do it
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Module 4: Program Review & Development. Conceptual Frameworks Backward Mapping • What is it? • Why do it? • How to do it? . Northern Sydney Region Teacher Professional Learning Amiee Satchell 3-6 English Consultant Rhonda Kaidbay 7-12 English Consultant. Conceptual Frameworks.

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Conceptual frameworks backward mapping what is it why do it how to do it

Module 4: Program Review & Development

Conceptual FrameworksBackward Mapping• What is it? • Why do it? • How to do it?

Northern Sydney Region

Teacher Professional Learning

AmieeSatchell 3-6 English Consultant

Rhonda Kaidbay 7-12 English Consultant


Conceptual frameworks
Conceptual Frameworks

●Concepts are significant notions that reflect the core ideas of the content being taught

●They enable students to comprehend and create meaning



Facts and concepts
Facts and Concepts

We must change the emphasis in instruction from memorisation of facts to the use of facts as a tool to develop deeper, conceptual understanding


Deep understanding
Deep Understanding

  • Student direction

  • Connectedness - authenticity

  • Higher-order thinking

  • Substantive communication

  • Explicit quality criteria

  • Problematic knowledge


Concepts
Concepts

Interrelationships

Sustainability

Transformation

Energy

Connections

Effects

Communication

Interdependence

Motion

Adaption

Biodiversity

  • Innovation

  • Conflict

  • Structures

  • Evolution

  • Formation

  • Systems or management

  • Relationships

  • Probability

  • Measurements

  • Substitutions

  • Patterns

  • Belonging



Focus on learning
Focus on learning been forgotten.

  • What do I want my students to learn?

  • Why does it matter?

  • What do they already know?

  • How will they demonstrate learning?

  • How will they get there?


Bm what is it
BM- What is it? been forgotten.

  • Creating a unit of work by starting with the final assessment.

  • Through the assessment task, you choose the syllabus outcomes that you want your students to demonstrate

  • You identify the concept from which students will attain a deep understanding of the skills and knowledge they need to demonstrate.

    General principal of BM-

    begin with the end.


“Begin with the end in mind” - Covey been forgotten.

Worth being familiar with

Important to know and do

“Enduring

Understanding”

“Big Ideas”



BM- Why do it? been forgotten.

To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination. It means to know where you are going so that you better understand where you are now, so that the steps you take are always in the right direction.

Stephen R. Covey

The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People


Why backward design
Why ‘backward design’? been forgotten.

The stages are logical but they go against habits

  • We’re used to jumping to lesson and activity ideas before clarifying our performance goals for students

  • By thinking through the assessments upfront, we ensure greater alignment of our goals, and therefore teaching is focused on the desired results


How do you do it
How been forgotten. do you do it?

3 Step Guide…

Step 1: Develop a quality assessment task

Step 2: Extracting the essential skills and knowledge from the task

Step 3: Creating learning opportunities to build student skills and knowledge


Step 1 develop a quality assessment task
Step 1: been forgotten. Develop a quality assessment task

THE ASSESSMENT TASK

When writing the task the following questions need to be considered

  • What do I want to assess?

  • What outcomes can be demonstrated in this task?

  • What type of assessment will I be using? (I.e. exam or assignment)

  • How much time will students have to complete this task?

  • What key concepts will they engage with?

  • What other skills will I incorporate into this task? (literacy and numeracy)


Develop a quality assessment task been forgotten.

You are a geographicaljournalist for a popular Geography magazine. Your latest assignment is to write an article on Homebush Bay wetlands and how people interact with this environment. As an expert Geographer you understand the importance of wetlands as an ecosystem of special global significance. The purpose of this article is to explain the significance of wetlands, how they are threatened and why they need to be protected.


Step 2: been forgotten. Extracting the essential skills and knowledge from the task

Once you have completed the assignment, you will need to review it and to identify the different skills and knowledge students are required to have if they are to successfully complete it.


Develop a quality assessment task been forgotten.

Knowledge

Skills

You are a geographicaljournalist for a popular Geography magazine. Your latest assignment is to write an article on Homebush Bay wetlands and how people interact with this environment. As an expert Geographer you understand the importance of wetlands as an ecosystem of special global significance. The purpose of this article is to explain the significance of wetlands, how they are threatened and why they need to be protected.


Skills & Knowledge include been forgotten.

BM- How do you do it?

Some Skills Include

Write an article

  • Layout (title, columns, pictures)

  • Use persuasive language

    Basic ICT skills

  • Basic formatting

    Research & data collection skills

  • Primary and secondary data

  • Referencing a bibliography

Some Knowledge Includes

  • Use geographical language (or jargon)

  • Features of a wetland

  • Wetlands are a global environment

  • Geographical processes

  • Cause and effect relationship between human communities and the wetland environment

  • What are stakeholders?

  • About Homebush Bay wetlands


Developing corresponding teaching & learning activities been forgotten.

Some Knowledge Includes

  • Use geographical language (or jargon)

  • Features of a wetland

  • Wetlands are a global environment

  • Geographical processes

  • Cause and effect relationship between human communities and the environment

  • History of land use of Homebush Bay wetlands

Some Activities in the program include

A-Aural, K-Kinaesthetic, O-Oral, V-Visual

  • Watching a video and identifying features of a wetland, sketching a diagram with these features (V, K)

  • Locating wetlands on a world map (V,K)

  • Geographical processes demonstration using a simulation tank ((A, V)

  • Complete an information table which looks at managing wetlands (O, K, V)

  • Homebush bay wetlands excursion, primary data collection, tours, hands-on experiments and measurements (A, K, O, V)


Teacher’s Marking Guidelines been forgotten.

A: 17-20 - B: 13-16 C: 9-12 D: 5-8 E: 1-4


Conclusion been forgotten.

BM is a useful tool which takes time to develop but in the long run, ensures efficiency and (hopefully) student success. The planning is only 20% of the job, the execution of the lesson is the other 80%!


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