Teaching and learning with technology in northside
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Teaching and Learning with Technology in Northside. JoAnne Reddell, Assistant Superintendent Diana Goering, Executive Director Kelly Smith, Executive Director December 2003. Presentation Outline. K-12 Curriculum Requirements Technology Access Best Practices for Technology Use

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Teaching and learning with technology in northside

Teaching and Learning with Technology in Northside

JoAnne Reddell, Assistant Superintendent

Diana Goering, Executive Director

Kelly Smith, Executive Director

December 2003


Presentation outline

Presentation Outline

  • K-12 Curriculum Requirements

  • Technology Access

  • Best Practices for Technology Use

  • The “Human Infrastructure”

  • Educator Training & Development


K 12 curriculum requirements

K-12 Curriculum Requirements


K 12 curriculum requirements1

K-12 Curriculum Requirements

  • Technology Applications TEKS

    • K-12 state-mandated curriculum standards for technology

    • Delineate what students should know and be able to do using technology

    • Benchmark years at Grades 2, 5, and 8 with courses specified at the middle and high school levels

    • Four common strands for Grades K-12:Foundations, Information Acquisition, Solving Problems, and Communication


K 12 curriculum requirements2

K-12 Curriculum Requirements

  • Core and Enrichment TEKS

    • Use of computers and related technologies included in the state-mandated TEKS for English Language Arts and Reading, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies, Fine Arts, International Languages, P.E., etc. for grades K-12.

    • Access to computers for core and enrichment teachers to use with their students must be provided in order to meet these requirements.(Full computer labs, mini-labs, librairies, laptop carts, one computer classroom, etc.)


K 12 curriculum requirements3

K-12 Curriculum Requirements

  • Graduation Requirements

    • One technology applications graduation credit is required of all students under all graduation plans.

      • Began with ninth grade students entering high school in 1997-98.

      • Seventeen high school courses that meet this requirement (Computer Information Systems, Multimedia, Computer Science, Web Mastering, Digital Graphics & Animation, etc.).

    • There are many computer-based high school courses that do not count for the technology graduation requirement, but still require daily access to computers.

      • These courses include Keyboarding, Accounting, Journalism, Math Models, Cisco, AP Statistics, Office Administration , etc.


K 12 curriculum requirements4

K-12 Curriculum Requirements

  • Interventions Using Technology

    • Computer-based intervention is appropriate for many students with significant need for practice in reading fluency, math concepts, and remediation and credit-retrieval in all core content areas.

    • To this end, computers are provided at all grade levels to augment classroom and lab computers for intervention purposes and meet the needs of the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act.

    • Technology supports programs such as the Student Success Initiative, Read 180 and high school credit retrieval.


K 12 curriculum requirements5

K-12 Curriculum Requirements

  • Special Programs and Populations

    • Technology is an integral part of the District’s comprehensive special programs to meet the needs of students in Special Education, Gifted Education, and Bilingual / ESL programs.

    • Many special education students’ Individualized Education Plans (IEP) require the use of technology under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).


K 12 curriculum requirements6

K-12 Curriculum Requirements

  • Special Programs and Populations

    • Technology needs range from assistive technology, which helps special education students be more independent in their surroundings, to high-end video production equipment for G/T students, to Spanish teaching and learning computer programs for Bilingual students.


K 12 curriculum requirements7

K-12 Curriculum Requirements

  • Distance Learning Credit Opportunities

    • Access to web-based course content and online instructors provide additional learning and credit-earning opportunities for special populations students.

    • For example, the Northside Excel Academy provides synchronous and asynchronous distance learning opportunities, during daytime and evening hours, for more than 200 students to meet their individual learning needs.


Elementary schools technology access best practices

Elementary Schools: Technology Access & Best Practices


Elementary technology access

Elementary Technology Access

  • Two labs, each with with 27 computers, 3 printers, 1 scanner, 1 digital projector

  • Computer in every classroom with 1 personal printer and wall mounted TV/VCR display

  • Campus-wide Video Distribution System

  • 4 digital cameras for campus-wide use

  • Library: 9 student computers, 2 printers, 1 scanner, 1 laptop, 1 projector, 1 librarian desktop, 1 circulation desktop

  • Gifted Education: 3 desktops, 1 laptop, 1 printer, 1 scanner, 1 digital camera, 1 camcorder

  • Special Ed.: 8 desktops, 1 printer, 1 scanner

  • Interventions: 1 or 2 mobile mini-lab carts with 4-17 laptops


Best practices for elementary technology use

Best Practices for Elementary Technology Use

  • Technology Literacy Lab

    • To address the development of technology skills

    • Whole-class instruction in foundational skills

    • Rotation schedule (every 5-8 days) for K-5

    • Instruction is:

      • Based on K-5 Technology Applications TEKS and NISD Technology Vertical Alignment Standards

      • Planned by Campus Instructional Technologist (CIT) & Elementary Computer Technologist (ECT)

      • Delivered by ECT

    • Curriculum is district-created K-5 Application Training Guide


Best practices for elementary technology use1

Best Practices for Elementary Technology Use

  • Technology Integration Lab

    • To address the integration of technology into core and enrichment content objectives

    • Emphasizes problem solving, information acquisition, higher-order thinking skills, communication

    • Flexible scheduling for grades K-5

    • Instruction is:

      • Based on K-5 core and enrichment content TEKS and NISD Academic Standards

      • Delivered by classroom teacher and Campus Instructional Technologist

      • Tied to School Improvement Plan and teacher appraisal (PDAS)

    • Curriculum consists of district-created Content TIP, teacher-created activities, CIT-created activities


Best practices for elementary technology use2

Best Practices for ElementaryTechnology Use

  • Libraries & Classrooms

    • Students build upon knowledge and skills learned in the labs

    • Additional access to technology tools for students

    • Increased opportunities for information acquisition (online databases, Internet, eBooks) and student presentations

  • Mini-labs in specialty areas

    • Integrated into curriculum for remediation or enrichment purposes

    • Centers for group collaboration or individual work


Middle schools technology access best practices

Middle Schools: Technology Access & Best Practices


Middle school technology access

Middle School Technology Access

  • Four labs, each with with 28 computers, 3 printers, 1 scanner, 1 digital projector

  • Computer in every classroom with 1 personal printer and wall mounted TV/VCR display

  • Campus-wide Video Distribution System

  • 6 digital cameras for campus-wide use

  • Library: 15 student computers, 2 printers, 1 scanner, 1 laptop, 1 projector, 1 librarian desktop, 1 circulation desktop

  • Gifted Education: 3 desktops, 1 laptop, 1 printer, 1 scanner, 1 digital camera, 1 camcorder

  • Special Ed.: 7 desktops, 1 printer, 1 scanner

  • Science: 1 mobile mini-lab cart with 10 laptops, 1 printer

  • Keyboarding 1 mobile mini-lab cart with 30 Alphasmarts, 1 printer

  • EXCEL Math: 1 mobile mini-lab with 2-20 laptops (depending on enrollment), 1 printer


Best practices for middle school technology use

Best Practices for Middle School Technology Use

  • Technology Credit Labs

    • To address the development of technology and content skills via specific courses

    • Whole-class instruction, emphasizing foundational skills, problem solving, information acquisition, communication

    • Instruction is:

      • Based on 6-8 Technology Applications TEKS and NISD course curriculum

        • Keyboarding in grade 6 (per campus requirement)

        • Computer Literacy in grade 7 (per campus requirement)

        • Advanced Computer Technologies in grade 8 (elective)

        • Industrial Technology in grades 7 and 8 (elective)

      • Delivered by Technology teacher

    • Curriculum is district-created


Best practices for middle school technology use1

Best Practices for Middle School Technology Use

  • Technology Integration Lab

    • To address the integration of technology into core and enrichment content objectives

    • Emphasizes problem solving, information acquisition, higher-order thinking skills, communication

    • Flexible scheduling for grades 6-8

    • Instruction is:

      • Based on 6-8 core and enrichment content TEKS and NISD Academic Standards

      • Delivered by classroom teacher and Campus Instructional Technologist

      • Tied to School Improvement Plan and teacher appraisal (PDAS)

    • Curriculum consists of district-created Content TIP, teacher-created activities, CIT-created activities


Best practices for middle school technology use2

Best Practices for Middle School Technology Use

  • Libraries & Classrooms

    • Students build upon knowledge and skills learned in the labs

    • Additional access to technology tools for students

    • Increased opportunities for information acquisition (online databases, Internet, eBooks) and student presentations

  • Mini-labs in specialty areas

    • Integrated into curriculum for remediation or enrichment purposes

    • Centers for group collaboration or individual work


High schools technology access best practices

High Schools: Technology Access & Best Practices


High school technology access

High School Technology Access

  • Labs, each with 29 computers, 3 printers, 1 scanner, 1 digital projector

    • Schools with 12 labs: O'Connor, Clark, Jay, Marshall, Warren

    • Schools with 15 labs: Holmes/BCHS, Taft/Comm. Arts

    • School with 4 labs: HCHS

  • Computer in every classroom with 1 personal printer and wall mounted TV/VCR display

  • Campus-wide Video Distribution System

  • 6 digital cameras for campus-wide use

  • Library: 21 or 22 student computers, 2 printers, 1 scanner, 1 laptop, 1 projector, 1 librarian desktop, 1 or 2 circulation desktops


High school technology access1

High School Technology Access

  • Gifted Education: 1 desktop, 2 laptops, 1 printer, 1 scanner, 1 digital camera, 1 camcorder

  • Special Ed.: 13 desktops, 1 mobile mini-lab cart with 12 laptops, 1 printer, 1 scanner

  • Science: 8 desktop mini-lab for Chemistry, 1 mobile mini-lab cart with 12 laptops, 1 printer

  • International Languages: 62 computer workstations, 60 listening stations, server, 6 printers, and specialty software and hardware

  • Journalism & Photography: 2 Mac Labs

  • Career Center: up to 11 desktops (depending on space), 1 printer, 1 scanner


Best practices for high school technology use

Best Practices for High School Technology Use

  • Technology Credit Labs

    • To address the development of technology and content skills via specific courses

    • Instruction is:

      • Based on 9-12 Technology Applications TEKS, Career and Technology Education TEKS, and NISD course curriculum

        • Web Mastering, Multimedia, Digital Graphics & Animation, Desktop Publishing, Video Technologies, Computer Science I and II, Independent Study

        • Computer Applications, Communication Graphics, Business Computer Information Systems I and II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, Technology Systems

      • Delivered by Technology teacher using district-created curriculum, emphasizing foundational skills, problem solving, information acquisition, communication


Best practices for high school technology use1

Best Practices for High School Technology Use

  • Technology Integration Labs

    • To address the integration of technology into core and enrichment content objectives

    • Emphasizes problem solving, information acquisition, higher-order thinking skills, communication

    • Flexible scheduling for grades 9-12

    • Instruction is:

      • Based on 9-12 core and enrichment content TEKS and NISD Academic Standards

      • Delivered by classroom teacher and Campus Instructional Technologist

      • Tied to School Improvement Plan and teacher appraisal (PDAS)

    • Curriculum consists of district-created Content TIP, teacher-created activities, CIT-created activities


Best practices for high school technology use2

Best Practices for High School Technology Use

  • Libraries & Classrooms

    • Students build upon knowledge and skills learned in the labs

    • Additional access to technology tools for students

    • Increased opportunities for information acquisition (online databases, Internet, eBooks) and student presentations

  • Mini-labs in specialty areas

    • Integrated into curriculum for remediation or enrichment purposes

    • Centers for group collaboration or individual work


Technology personnel for teaching and learning

Technology Personnel for Teaching and Learning


The human infrastructure

The “Human Infrastructure”

  • Elementary

    • 1 ECT (Elem. Computer Technologist)

    • 1 CIT (Campus Instructional Technologist)

    • 1 Librarian and 1 Library Assistant

    • All classroom teachers

  • Middle School

    • 1 CIT

    • 1 Librarian and 1 Library Assistant

    • 2-4 Technology Teachers

    • All core and enrichment teachers


The human infrastructure1

The “Human Infrastructure”

  • High School

    • 1 CIT

    • 1 CAT (Campus Applications Technologist, for gradebook and administrative support)

    • 1 Technician

    • 8 CATF (Content Area Technology Facilitator, fulltime teacher with stipend)

    • 1 Librarian and 2 Library Assistants

    • 10+ Technology Teachers

    • All core and enrichment teachers

  • Special Schools

    • 1 CTF (Campus Technology Facilitator, fulltime teacher with stipend) at each

    • 1 Library Assistant shared between Holmgreen and Northside Children’s Center


The human infrastructure2

The “Human Infrastructure”

  • District

    • 4 Coordinator/Specialists for Academic Technology Services

    • 2 Specialists for Library Services

    • 1 CIT for Special Schools

    • 5 Specialists for Training and Development Services


Educator training and development

Educator Training and Development


Technology training and development

Technology Training and Development

  • Teacher Standards

    • The TexasState Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) Technology Applications Standards have recently (Fall 2002) been incorporated into the new ExCET/TExES for Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities at each certification level.

    • These standards, organized into five strands, are required of ALL beginning teachers and recommended for all Northside teachers.


Technology training and development1

Technology Training and Development

  • Teacher Training & Development

    • Campus-based, Literacy and Integration

      • After school classes

      • Early release day classes

      • CIT modeling & team teaching in lab and classrooms

      • Conference period small group mini-lessons

      • “Just in time” individual assistance

  • District-based, Literacy and Integration

    • After school & daytime classes/central location

    • Online learning opportunities

    • Special Programs (seminars, Intel, TIF Tech, PAVE)

    • eCamp NISD technology conference


Technology training and development2

Technology Training and Development

  • Administrator Standards

    • The Technology Standards for School Administrators (TSSA) Collaborative identify knowledge and skills constituting the "core" of what every P-12 administrator needs to know about and be able to do with technology regardless of specific job role.

    • These national standards, endorsed by various state and national education organizations and organized into six strands, are recommended for all Northside administrators.


Technology training and development3

Technology Training and Development

  • Administrator Training & Development

    • Campus-based, Literacy and Integration

      • “Just in time” individual assistance from CIT and (high school only) CAT and CATF

      • Small group mini-lessons led by district Technology Training Specialists

  • District-based, Literacy and Integration

    • Daytime classes led by Technology Training Specialists

    • Turning Points Technology Leadership sessions

    • Online learning opportunities

    • Special Programs (TIF Tech, PAVE)

    • eCamp NISD technology conference


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