Charlie
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 7

Charlie PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 105 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Charlie. Case study. Part 1: the story so far…. 18-month old infant with cough and wheeze and a history of eczema Family history of asthma and eczema On examination there is mild sub-costal recession, hyperinflation of the chest with a prominent sternum and widespread wheeze

Download Presentation

Charlie

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Charlie

Charlie

Case study


Part 1 the story so far

Part 1: the story so far…

  • 18-month old infant with cough and wheeze and a history of eczema

  • Family history of asthma and eczema

  • On examination there is mild sub-costal recession, hyperinflation of the chest with a prominent sternum and widespread wheeze

  • Evidence of eczema.


Part 1 q uestions

Part 1: questions

How do you eliminate most of the possible causes of Charlie’s symptoms?

What questions do you ask about the family?


Part 1 key point

Part 1: key point

  • Diagnose before treating


Part 2 the story continues

Part 2: the story continues…

  • Diagnosed with asthma

  • Age 5 years, starting school, control lost

  • Symptomatic with inhaled corticosteroids 200mcg bd


Part 2 questions

Part 2: questions

What do you think is the appropriate next step for management of Charlie’s symptoms?

Should Charlie be referred for specialist assessment?


Part 2 key point

Part 2: key point

  • Add inhaled long-acting ß2 agonists rather than increasing dose of inhaled steroids (above 800mcg/day in adults and 400mcg/day in children) in children from 5 years onwards


  • Login