Building working relationships with tribes tribal courts and state courts
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 15

Building Working Relationships with Tribes, Tribal Courts, and State Courts PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 92 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Building Working Relationships with Tribes, Tribal Courts, and State Courts. Judge Mark Pouley Commissioner Michelle Ressa October 9, 2012 ICW Summit. The History of Indian Child Welfare.

Download Presentation

Building Working Relationships with Tribes, Tribal Courts, and State Courts

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Building working relationships with tribes tribal courts and state courts

Building Working Relationships with Tribes, Tribal Courts, and State Courts

Judge Mark Pouley

Commissioner Michelle Ressa

October 9, 2012 ICW Summit


The history of indian child welfare

The History of Indian Child Welfare

1819 Congress creates Civilization Fund so church groups could “put into the hands of their [indian] children the primer and the hoe… and they will grow up in the habits of morality and industry.”

“KILL THE INDIAN, SAVE THE CHILD”


The history of indian child welfare1

The History of Indian Child Welfare

1958 Indian Adoption Project

to provide adoptive placement for American Indian children whose parents were deemed unable to provide a “suitable” home


Comparative rates for indian children in wa state

Comparative Rates forIndian Children In WA state

US Congress American Policy Review Commission, May 17, 1977


The history of indian child welfare2

The History of Indian Child Welfare

1978 Congressional ICWA statements:

“there is no resource more vital to the continued existence and integrity of Indian tribes than their children”

“[it’s the] policy of this nation to protect the best interests of Indian children and to promote the stability and security of Indian tribes and families”


The history of indian child welfare3

The History of Indian Child Welfare

US Supreme Court in Holyfield

“Congress was concerned not solely about the interests of Indian children and families, but also about the impact on the tribes themselves . . . (t)he protection of this tribal interest is at the core of [the ICWA] which recognizes that the tribe has an interest in the child which is distinct from but on parity with the interests of the parents.”


Comparative rates for indian children in wa state1

Comparative Rates forIndian Children In WA state

Nat’l Council of Juvenile & Family Court Judges, May 2011


The need to coordinate with tribes

The Need to Coordinate with Tribes

Conference of Chief Justices - - Resolution 5 (1/26/11)

Close communication and cooperation between state and tribal courts have been inhibited by:

the lack of contact information for tribal judges in many states;

the difficulty in electronically exchanging information regarding child protection cases between tribal and state courts;

the lack of information regarding the requirements of ICWA, the reasons for those requirements, and the relationship of ICWA to other federal legislation on child welfare such as the Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) and the Fostering Connections Act


The value of tribal contribution

The Value of Tribal Contribution

National Council of Juvenile & Family Court Judges

January 11, 2011 “Resolution in Support of Tribal Courts”

The NCJFCJ Board of Trustees is, and shall be, committed to engaging the tribal courts as full partners in fulfilling the mission of the National Council and in meeting the needs of all children and families served by the state and tribal courts, complying with the letter and the spirit of all laws effecting Native children and families including, but not limited to, the Indian Child Welfare Act, the Adoption and Safe Families Act in a context that supports tribal culture, the Tribal Law and Order Act, and the full faith and credit provisions of the Constitution and of federal laws of the United States.


Collaboration engagement is a best practice

Collaboration & EngagementIs a “Best Practice”

National Council of Juvenile & Family Court Judges

“Collaboration and authentic engagement between tribal communities is a best practice.”

“’Meaningful, ongoing collaboration’” means that courts and agencies will identify and work toward shared goals and activities to increase the safety, permanency, and well-being of children in the child welfare system. Courts must form statewide, multidisciplinary task forces which include tribal representation.”


Coordination collaboration increases compliance

Coordination & Collaboration, Increases Compliance

Center for Court Innovation 2011 Report

The Indian Child Welfare Act – Improving

Compliance through State-Tribal Court Coordination

“Compliance with ICWA must be established as a shared priority for the child welfare system, family courts, and tribal courts. Greater collaboration between tribal and state courts can accelerate notification, minimize delays in transferring cases from state to tribal courts, and assist in locating resources to preserve Native American families and protect the best interests of Native American children.”


Common elements of successful collaborations

Common Elements of Successful Collaborations

Tribal Law & Policy Institute – 2011 Report on Promising Strategies

strong & persistent leadership – institutionalization

follow from sustained educational efforts

focus on common goals (not conflicts)

Prioritize fairness to parties

low cost or cost savings (avoid duplicative litigation)


Washington tribal state judicial consortium walking on common ground

Washington Tribal-State Judicial Consortium“Walking on Common Ground”

MISSION

In the spirit of mutual respect and cooperation, take the lead in resolving civil and criminal jurisdictional conflicts between Tribal and State Courts.


Washington tribal state judicial consortium walking on common ground1

Washington Tribal-State Judicial Consortium“Walking on Common Ground”

GOALS

Build relationships and foster communication

Develop and review Tribal and State court system protocols and practices

Offer educational programs on overlapping areas of interest

Support ongoing evaluation of collaborative efforts and practices


Washington tribal state judicial consortium walking on common ground2

Washington Tribal-State Judicial Consortium“Walking on Common Ground”

VALUES

Equal Representation

Cooperation

Sharing

Improving Access to Justice

Adopting Mutually Acceptable Solutions


  • Login