You ve been shopped mystery shopping for better service
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You’ve Been Shopped! Mystery Shopping for Better Service PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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You’ve Been Shopped! Mystery Shopping for Better Service. The UCF Libraries Experience Marcus Kilman. Tools for better customer service:. Hiring the right people Training Department internal training UCF training Other OPAC/Database training Reference Interview training

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You’ve Been Shopped! Mystery Shopping for Better Service

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You’ve Been Shopped! Mystery Shopping for Better Service

The UCF Libraries Experience

Marcus Kilman


Tools for better customer service:

  • Hiring the right people

  • Training

    • Department internal training

    • UCF training

    • Other

      • OPAC/Database training

      • Reference Interview training

      • Printer/Copier service training

  • Empowerment


  • Tools for better customer service (cont):

    • Judgment

    • Mutual Trust

    • Job Satisfaction

    • Feedback

      • Surveys

      • Suggestions/Comments Box (also online)

      • Open Door policy

      • Mystery Shopper


    Mystery Shopping at UCF

    • Available through UCF Human Resources’ Office of Organization Development & Training

    • Developed and facilitated by training consultant Marjorie Chusmir

    • Circulation Department has completed two Mystery Shopper surveys (May 2006 and October 2007)


    Planning the Mystery Shopper surveys

    • First survey preceded by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator session

    • Met with facilitators to define various shopper interactions

    • Interactions were both in-person and telephone

    • Interactions were designed to be “problem patrons”


    Example “shopper” interactions:

    • As a student, attempt to check out video or book without UCF ID

    • Call circulation desk with book title and ask staff to retrieve book and hold at desk

    • Try to check out a book using driver’s license only, claiming to be local resident who “pays taxes”

    • Ask at the circulation desk to reserve a study room


    Measures of success:

    • In person

      • Customer awareness

      • Customer Service

    • Over the phone

      • Greeting

      • Friendliness

      • Service

    • All interactions were anonymous


    Scale of measure:

    • Strength = interaction was rated high overall

    • Needs improvement = some elements were rated high and others were not

    • Strong Development Need = most elements were rated low


    First survey results:

    • In-Person:

      • Customer Awareness = Strength

      • Customer Service = Needs Improvement

    • Over the Phone:

      • Greeting = Strength

      • Friendliness = Needs Improvement

      • Service = Needs Improvement


    Recommendations:

    • Staff form 3 groups to develop strategies to address:

      • Friendliness (be “warm and friendly” not just “polite and professional”)

      • Phone etiquette (formalize procedures for answering and transferring calls, referring when necessary, importance of attitude)

      • Service (attention to details, thoroughness)


    Second survey measures:

    • Measures of success were:

      • In-person

        • Customer awareness

        • Customer service

        • Policy Adherence

      • Over the phone

        • Greeting

        • Friendliness

        • Service

        • Policy Adherence


    Scale of measure:

    • Strength = interaction was rated high overall

    • Opportunity for improvement = some elements were rated high and others were not

    • Strong Development Need = most elements were rated low


    Second survey results:

    • In-person

      • Customer awareness = Strength

      • Customer service = Opportunity

      • Policy Adherence = Strength

    • Over the phone

      • Greeting = Opportunity

      • Friendliness = Opportunity

      • Service = Strength

      • Policy Adherence = Strength


    Recommendations:

    • Staff continue to work on “warm and friendly” versus “polite and professional”


    Conclusions:

    • Mystery Shopper surveys produced no “big surprises”

    • Mystery Shopper surveys are useful when used in conjunction with other feedback and survey tools

    • We will continue to use the Mystery Shopper surveys on an irregular basis

      • Ask for more “aggressive” shoppers


    Contact information:

    Marcus Kilman

    [email protected]

    (407) 823-2527


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