abdication or emancipation how far can students as stakeholders go joe gazdula and amanda dalzell
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Abdication or Emancipation: How far can students as stakeholders go? Joe Gazdula and Amanda Dalzell. Student Stakeholders. Outline current thinking of the student voice Conduct an informed study of opinions on students as stakeholders Assess student integration possibilities

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Presentation Transcript
objectives

Outline current thinking of the student voice

Conduct an informed study of opinions on students as stakeholders

Assess student integration possibilities

Collect ideas of stakeholder democracy

Present an informed opinion of qualified viewpoints for publication

Plan further research

Objectives
student voice

Every Child Matters: The first stated Aim of ECM 4 Make a Positive Contribution, is that Children and Young People should “Engage in decision making and support the community and environment”.

The National Healthy School Standard highlights the “double benefit … when … pupils are involved in the process (of their education), it helps them understand the kind of young people the school is trying to nurture” (NHSS DfES 2004:11).

Student Voice

student voice1

Educators often use the image of a ‘ladder’ of participation

  • Bottom rungs: students with little or no choice about what they do and how they participate and no real influence over decisions
  • Middle rungs: a greater degree of participation, ownership and decision making
  • Top rungs: top of the ladder, students are empowered, they initiate agendas and are given responsibility to bring about change.

(National College for Leadership of Schools and Children’s Services, 2010)

Student Voice

- ‘Ladder of Participation’

student voice example of good practice

Hastingsbury Business and Enterprise College has been a leading school in student voice work. The school’s approach is based on the belief that learning from one’s peers can be more powerful than learning from a teacher. For example, the school trains post-16 students to act as mentors to younger students. The mentors cover relationship issues for Year 9 pupils, drugs education for Year 10 and alcohol education for Year 11.

  • The school was the first in the country to offer a GCSE in student voice and there is a great emphasis on students becoming researchers. Students also sit on recruiting panels for new teachers. The school ethos is to bring groups of students together to talk about their experiences and learn from one another. Listening to this discussion also gives teachers insight into community issues.
Student Voice - Example of good practice
student voice not all smooth sailing

Read the Handout

Would you judge Student Voice a success?

Student Voice –Not all Smooth Sailing
student stakeholders not a new concept

See

  • Stephenson, J. & Yorke, M. (1998)Capability & Quality in Higher Education, (Eds), Kogan Page,
  • Osborne, C. Davies, J. Garnett, J. (1998) Guiding the Student to the Centre of the Stakeholder Curriculum: Independent and Work-based Learning at Middlesex University The HE Academy
  • Pearce, L. (2003) Our student stakeholders: requirements for institutional portals VINE Vol. 3 Iss. 31 P.11-16
Student Stakeholders – Not a new concept
student stakeholders

Independent learning at Middlesex - the basic concept

ILE at Middlesex University arose to cater for students (often mature) wanting more personally meaningful study opportunity than conventional curriculum provision. Within the constraints that the topic of study must:

• lend itself to genuine (and respectable) academic study, and

• must not duplicate existing taught modules,

students can design up to half their total programme (modules) for years two to three. For a proposal to become a \'learning agreement\' (renegotiable), the student must identify, and recruit the support of, a tutor to oversee (and grade) the work. A further distinctive feature of ILE working is that, although the student proposes the means (and criteria) of assessment, a minimum 10 per cent of the marks for each module is obligatorily assigned to a \'reflective analysis\' wherein the student presents his/her estimation of what has (or has not) been achieved (and thereby, while not determining a grade, can valuably inform the grading tutor). (Osbourne et al 1998)

Student Stakeholders
defining the student stakeholder

According to some definitions stakeholders in higher education mean specific groups of external actors that have a direct or indirect interest in higher education and cannot always be covered by the consumer-provider analogy. New stakeholders have penetrated a traditional monopolistic relationship between the state and public higher education institutions with two main characteristics. Firstly, the role of the external actors has become more important in last few decades. Secondly, the influence of these external actors has also grown with respect to internal affairs of individual higher education institutions

(Maassen 2000)

Defining the student stakeholder
student stakeholder

Definitions are fuzzy.

Cambridge Dictionary online:

a person such as an employee, customer or citizen who is involved with an organization, society, etc. and therefore has responsibilities towards it and an interest in its success

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/stakeholder_1

Student Stakeholder -
but how much responsibility

Your Ladder!

Consultancy Card Sort Exercise:

Sort the cards into columns

Column 1 = those activities you feel students

should and could do. Prioritise

important ones at the top

Column 2 = those activities you feel students

should/could NOT do. Prioritise so the ones you

would least see as important are at the bottom

Prepare to feedback giving your reasons to the rest of the group

But How Much Responsibility?
summary

Students can do a lot!

Student Voice gives us great models and pitfalls

Individual institutions all have their own models

Individuals all have their own models

Consensus will be difficult

We will take your advice in our paper

Summary
references

Rogers, J. Frost, B. (Jan 2006) Every Child Matters: Empowering the Student Voice National Teacher Research Panel

  • (2010) National College for Leadership of Schools and Children’s Services http://www.nationalcollege.org.uk/index/leadershiplibrary/leadingschools/working-in-partnership/ecm/school-families-communities/student-voice.htm (accessed 12/4/10)
  • Stephenson, J. & Yorke, M. (1998)Capability & Quality in Higher Education, (Eds), Kogan Page,
  • Osborne, C. Davies, J. Garnett, J. (1998) Guiding the Student to the Centre of the Stakeholder Curriculum: Independent and Work-based Learning at Middlesex University The HE Academy
  • Maassen, P. (2000). Editorial. European Journal of Education, 4, 377–83.
  • http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/stakeholder_1 (accessed 12/4/2010)
References
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