Nested quantifiers
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Nested Quantifiers. CS/APMA 202, Spring 2005 Rosen, section 1.4 Aaron Bloomfield. Multiple quantifiers. You can have multiple quantifiers on a statement xy P(x, y) “For all x, there exists a y such that P(x,y)” Example: xy (x+y == 0) xy P(x,y)

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Nested Quantifiers

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Nested quantifiers

Nested Quantifiers

CS/APMA 202, Spring 2005

Rosen, section 1.4

Aaron Bloomfield


Multiple quantifiers

Multiple quantifiers

  • You can have multiple quantifiers on a statement

  • xy P(x, y)

    • “For all x, there exists a y such that P(x,y)”

    • Example: xy (x+y == 0)

  • xy P(x,y)

    • There exists an x such that for all y P(x,y) is true”

    • xy (x*y == 0)


Order of quantifiers

Order of quantifiers

  • xy and xy are not equivalent!

  • xy P(x,y)

    • P(x,y) = (x+y == 0) is false

  • xy P(x,y)

    • P(x,y) = (x+y == 0) is true


Negating multiple quantifiers

Negating multiple quantifiers

  • Recall negation rules for single quantifiers:

    • ¬x P(x) = x ¬P(x)

    • ¬x P(x) = x ¬P(x)

    • Essentially, you change the quantifier(s), and negate what it’s quantifying

  • Examples:

    • ¬(xy P(x,y))

      • = x ¬y P(x,y)

      • = xy ¬P(x,y)

    • ¬(xyz P(x,y,z))

      • = x¬yz P(x,y,z)

      • = x¬yz P(x,y,z)

      • = xyz ¬P(x,y,z)


Negating multiple quantifiers 2

Negating multiple quantifiers 2

  • Consider ¬(xy P(x,y)) = xy ¬P(x,y)

    • The left side is saying “for all x, there exists a y such that P is true”

    • To disprove it (negate it), you need to show that “there exists an x such that for all y, P is false”

  • Consider ¬(xy P(x,y)) = xy ¬P(x,y)

    • The left side is saying “there exists an x such that for all y, P is true”

    • To disprove it (negate it), you need to show that “for all x, there exists a y such that P is false”


Translating between english and quantifiers

Translating between English and quantifiers

  • Rosen, section 1.4, question 20

  • The product of two negative integers is positive

    • xy ((x<0)  (y<0) → (xy > 0))

    • Why conditional instead of and?

  • The average of two positive integers is positive

    • xy ((x>0)  (y>0) → ((x+y)/2 > 0))

  • The difference of two negative integers is not necessarily negative

    • xy ((x<0)  (y<0)  (x-y≥0))

    • Why and instead of conditional?

  • The absolute value of the sum of two integers does not exceed the sum of the absolute values of these integers

    • xy (|x+y| ≤ |x| + |y|)


Translating between english and quantifiers1

Translating between English and quantifiers

  • Rosen, section 1.4, question 24

  • xy (x+y = y)

    • There exists an additive identity for all real numbers

  • xy (((x≥0)  (y<0)) → (x-y > 0))

    • A non-negative number minus a negative number is greater than zero

  • xy (((x≤0)  (y≤0))  (x-y > 0))

    • The difference between two non-positive numbers is not necessarily non-positive (i.e. can be positive)

  • xy (((x≠0)  (y≠0)) ↔ (xy ≠ 0))

    • The product of two non-zero numbers is non-zero if and only if both factors are non-zero


Rosen section 1 4 question 30

Rosen, section 1.4 question 30

  • Rewrite these statements so that the negations only appear within the predicates

  • yx P(x,y)

    • yx P(x,y)

    • yx P(x,y)

  • xy P(x,y)

    • xy P(x,y)

    • xy P(x,y)

  • y (Q(y)  x R(x,y))

    • y (Q(y)  x R(x,y))

    • y (Q(y)  (x R(x,y)))

    • y (Q(y)  x R(x,y))


Rosen section 1 4 question 31

Rosen, section 1.4 question 31

  • Express the negations of each of these statements so that all negation symbols immediately precede predicates.

  • xyz T(x,y,z)

    • (xyz T(x,y,z))

    • xyz T(x,y,z)

    • xyz T(x,y,z)

    • xyz T(x,y,z)

    • xyz T(x,y,z)

  • xy P(x,y)  xy Q(x,y)

    • (xy P(x,y)  xy Q(x,y))

    • xy P(x,y)  xy Q(x,y)

    • xy P(x,y)  xy Q(x,y)

    • xy P(x,y)  xy Q(x,y)


Quick survey

Quick survey

  • I felt I understood the material in this slide set…

  • Very well

  • With some review, I’ll be good

  • Not really

  • Not at all


Quick survey1

Quick survey

  • The pace of the lecture for this slide set was…

  • Fast

  • About right

  • A little slow

  • Too slow


Quick survey2

Quick survey

  • How interesting was the material in this slide set? Be honest!

  • Wow! That was SOOOOOO cool!

  • Somewhat interesting

  • Rather borting

  • Zzzzzzzzzzz


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