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Methods and Analysis BK8040 2007/2008. ir.Marc Koehler ir. Erno Langenberg ir. Ali Guney Dr. Karina Moraes Zarzar, PhD. Objectives. The objective of “Methods and Analysis” is that:

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Methods and analysis bk8040 2007 2008 l.jpg

Methods and Analysis BK80402007/2008

ir.Marc Koehler

ir. Erno Langenberg

ir. Ali Guney

Dr. Karina Moraes Zarzar, PhD


Objectives l.jpg

Objectives

The objective of “Methods and Analysis” is that:

Students are introduced to essential terminology, concepts and numerous aspects (such as context, program of requirements) of the architectural field.


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Objectives

The objective of “Methods and Analysis” is that:

2. Students develop programmatic and typological knowledge in architecture through the study of relevant cases.


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Objectives

The objective of “Methods and Analysis” is that:

3. Students learn how to use and adapt design precedents in the creation of innovative designs through the analysis of an architect’s oeuvre.


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Some questions

  • What means Analysis?

  • What means Methods?

  • Why should you analyze something?

  • Does it help you during design?

  • Does it help you in developing your position as architect?


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How can you analyze a building/project?

You can analyze it by:

  • Visiting the building

  • Studying visual material:

    • technical drawings

    • perspectives

    • Via photos, videos

  • Reading about it


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2 Approaches

  • Approach 1: You don’t have written material about a particular building

    • You base your analysis on the physical aspects of the building

    • You study the drawings (maybe also visit the building)

    • You start your explorative (almost exhaustive) analysis according to the methods

    • You make the synthesis of all the parts


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2 Approaches

  • Approach 2: You know something from the architect’s position and want to know how some aspects are expressed in his designs

    • You study the drawings (maybe also visit the building)

    • You start a specific analysis on the physical aspects of the building to uncover the specific themes found in the architect position)

    • You present a partial synthesis in explaining the specific themes


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2 Approaches

  • Both ways:

    • You need METHODS to REPRESENT your findings

      • To compare with other buildings

      • To communicate with other people

    • You will understand how to “read” a project/building


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Objectives

  • By the end of the course, students should be able to:

    • Bring together an adequate documentation of projects

    • Understand basic architectural concepts

    • Understand basic principles of composition

    • Critically perform a descriptive analysis of a precedent through:

      • numerous methods: Ching, Clark and Pause, Steadman and in particular the F(m).O.P)

      • and diverse approaches: composition, function, context, construction - according to Leupen’s Ontwerp en Analyse

    • Make a comparison of projects

    • Analyze the oeuvre of architects in relation to their worldviews (themes), their use of precedents

    • Make a proper presentation of the analysis

    • Be able to transfer their knowledge from precedent analysis to design


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Course Structure

  • The course is subdivided into 7 seminars of 4 hours each and a series of 7 lectures on methods.

  • Lectures =

    • general relevant terminology

    • methods

    • Study of the Oeuvre

  • Seminars =

    • discussion about selected architectural aspects

    • discussion about lectures

    • exercises


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The Assignment:

  • The students select (groups of 4 students):

    • The architect (from proposed list)

    • The themes (at least 2 themes)

    • Two representative projects of this architect

    • Apply Method(s) (to be learned during the lectures and seminars) to analyze, describe the findings, produce the parti,

    • Compare the two buildings

    • Analyze the oeuvre in relation to the selected themes: re-use, transformation and shifts

  • Result: Poster (format: A0) of the analysis

    • Introduction about the selected architect and his/her position(s)

    • Documentation of two projects of one architect: drawings, sketches, perspectives, pictures, texts

    • General description: primary and secondary elements, topological + functional representation and parti

    • Comparison of these projects referring to the selected themes.

    • Study of the oeuvre referring to the selected themes

    • Conclusion: reflection of the whole analysis

  • Attention:

    • results are always delivered in a CD as well as in a printing version.

    • Groups: max. 4 students.


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Poster Lay-Outon the blackboard


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List of Architects:

  • James Stirling

  • Tadao Ando

  • Herman Hertzberger

  • Louis Kahn

  • Frank Llyod Wright

  • Rem Koolhaas

  • MVRDV

  • Jorn Utzon

  • Jo Coenen

  • Hendrik Petrus Berlage

  • Richard Meier

  • Aldo Rossi

  • Norman Foster

  • Renzo Piano

  • Toyo Ito

  • Peter Zumthor

  • Zaha Hadid

  • Alvaro Siza


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Seminar Course: Method and Analysis

Seminar 1:

Concepts

Intro. FOP

Ching

Aspect:

Theme

Seminar 2:

Concepts

Ching

Clark & Pause

Aspect:

Prog. Of Req.

Seminar 3:

Clark & Pause

Steadman

Aspect:

Design concept

Seminar 4:

Aspect:

Materials: Sensorial, texture, esthetic

System & Construction

Architectural Details

Seminar 4:

F.O.P.

Seminar 5:

Aspect: Typology;

Design Precedents;

Oeuvre

Seminar 6:

Aspect:

Design

Precedents

and identity

Seminar 7:

Presentation of the comparisson of two buildings + oeuvre

Lecture 1:

ALI

Lecture 2:

ALI

Lecture 3:

ALI

Lecture 4: Erno

Lecture 5: ALI

Lecture 6:

KARINA

Lecture 7:

KARINA

  • Terminology

  • Introduction to F.O.P.

  • Ching:

  • Sp. Relations

  • Sp. Organiz.

  • -Ching:

  • Movement

  • circulation

  • -Program of Requirement

  • -Clark and Pause:

  • Geometry

  • Light Fall

  • Structural System

  • -Clark and Pause:

  • Hierarchy

  • Massing

  • PARTI

  • -Steadman:

  • Topological Relations

-Materials, Structures and Details

Analysis

F(M) – O- P

Design

  • Precedents and Innovations

Precedents and

Identity


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SEMINARS

Discussing Architectural Aspects: 30 minutes

Literature

Analysis

Critique

Discussing lecture “n”

30 to 60 minutes

Work in Sub-groups

(exercises) 1:15 hr

Seminar

Round table

40 minutes

New Assignments

5 minutes

Course structure per seminar

Not all seminars


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Literature

REQUIRED LITERATURE:

  • Leupen, Bernard et al. 1999. Ontwerp en Analyse. Rotterdam: Uitgeverij 010.

  • Ching, F.D.K. (1979) Architecture: form, space and order

  • Clark, R.H. and Pause, M. (1985) Precedents in Architecture

  • Steadman, J P. 1989. Architectural Morphology-Topological (graph theoretical) representations of plans

  • Tzonis. A. 1992. “Huts, ships and bottleracks: Design by analogy for architects and/or machines”. In: Research in Design Thinking. Edited by: N. Cross, K. Dorst; and N. Roozenburg. Delft: Delft University Press: pp 139-164.

  • Tzonis, A. and L. Oorschot. 1987. Frames, Plans, Representation, Conceptdictaat inleiding programatische & functionele analyse. Delft: TU Delft, Faculty of Architecture, Art.nr. 236

  • Meiss, Pierre von. 1990. Elements of architecture; from form to place . New York: E & FN SPON, An Imprint of Routledge. (Oorspr. titel: De la forme au lieu, 1986)

  • Moraes Zarzar, K. and A. Guney (Editors). 2008. Understanding Meaningful Environments. Research in Design Series, Volume 4. Amsterdam: IOS Press under the imprint Delft University Press

  • Moraes Zarzar, K. 2003. “Breaking the Type”. Milan: GA2003

  • Moraes Zarzar, K. 2004. “Precedents and Identity”. Milan: GA2004

  • Christian Nobert-Schulz. 1976. “The Phenomenon of Place”. In: Kate Nesbitt (ed.). Theorizing a New Agenda for Architecture, an anthology of Architectural Theory 1965-1995. New York: Princeton Architectural Press. 1996, pp. 412-428

  • DVD series: Architectures. Art Video. Vol. 1/2/3/4/5

    RECOMMENDED LITERATURE:

  • Jong, T.M.d. and H. Engel. 2002. “Typological Research”. In: Ways to study and research urban, architectural and technical design. Edited by: T. M. d. Jong and D. J. M. v. d. Voordt. Delft: Delft University Press .

  • Jong (2002) Mathematical models 24.14 Graph theory

  • Moraes Zarzar, K. 2003. Use and Adaptation of Precedents in Architectural Design, toward an evolutionary design model. Delft: DUP

  • Leupen, Bernard. 2002. Concept and type

  • Leupen, Bernard et al. (1999) Design and Typology

  • Meiss, Pierre von. 1998. Elements of architecture; from form to place. London, Spon (First Edition: De la forme au lieu, 1986)

  • Rossi, A. 1966. The Architecture of the City. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press.

  • Tzonis, A. and L.. Lefaivre. 1986. Classical Architecture, The Poetics of Order. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press


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