What does college and career ready mean for students with significant cognitive disabilities
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What does “College and Career Ready” mean for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities. Dynamic Learning Maps National Center and State Collaborative GSEG Projects June 2011. College and Career Ready for All….

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What does “College and Career Ready” mean for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities

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What does college and career ready mean for students with significant cognitive disabilities

What does “College and Career Ready” mean for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities

Dynamic Learning Maps

National Center and State Collaborative GSEG Projects

June 2011


College and career ready for all

College and Career Ready for All…

  • Components in a Comprehensive Definition of College Readiness for typical high school students

    • Key Cognitive Strategies

      • Problem solving, reasoning, analysis, interpretation, critical thinking

    • Key Content

      • Reading, Math, Science, Social Studies

    • Academic Behaviors

      • Self monitoring, time management, using information resources, social interaction skills,

    • Contextual Skills and Awareness

      • Seeking help with admissions, procedures, group interaction skills

        • (Conley, 2011)


Career readiness for all

Career Readiness for All

Preparedness for workplace refers to the reading and mathematics knowledge and skills needed to qualify for an occupation’s job training program; it does not necessarily mean that the qualifications to be hired for a job have been met (NAGB, 2009).

Sample pathways include:

  • Apprenticeship programs

  • Community College certification

  • Job training programs

  • On the job training

  • Vocational technical institutes


Employability skills for all

Employability Skills for All

Tony Wagner (2008) talks about the seven survival skills:

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving;

  • Collaboration; Agility and Adaptability;

  • Initiative and Entrepreneurialism;

  • Effective Oral and Written Communication;

  • Accessing and Analyzing information;

  • Curiosity and Imagination.

  • Partnership for 21st Century Skills

  • Association for Career and Technical Education

  • Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills


  • Post secondary education

    Post Secondary Education

    Opportunities for all …include, but are not limited to the following: pursuing knowledge, investigating career goals, acquiring maturity through new experiences, gaining new responsibilities and ways of problem-solving, and exploring aspects of life by engaging in new personal and professional relationships, and learning collectively with each other (TASH, 2006).


    Post secondary education opportunities

    Post Secondary Education Opportunities

    • Credit & non-credit or continuing education

    • Community college continuing education, vocational – technical institutes and 4 year colleges

    • Adult basic education

    • Local community programs

    • Workshops through retail stores

    • Personal development courses

      (Grigal, Hart & Paiewonsky, 2010)


    Did you know

    Did You Know?

    • The Higher Education Opportunity Act includes two major provisions that may facilitate entry into higher education for students with intellectual disability

      • Implementation of Model Demonstration sites.

      • Availability of financial aid if enrolled.


    Standards for post secondary education programs for students with intellectual disabilities

    Standards for Post Secondary Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    • Eight Standards

      • Academic Access

      • Career Development

      • Social Network

      • Self Determination

      • Integration with College Systems & Practices

      • Coordination and Collaboration

        • Think College Institute for Community Inclusion University of Massachusetts: Boston

          • (Weir, Hart, Grigal, )


    Cross walking

    Cross walking

    • All kids

      • Key Cognitive Strategies

        • Problem solving, reasoning, analysis, interpretation, critical thinking

      • Key Content

        • Reading, Math, Science, Social Studies

      • Academic Behaviors

        • Self monitoring, time management, using information resources, social interaction skills, working in groups

      • Contextual Skills and Awareness

        • Seeking help with admissions, procedures, group interaction skills

          • (Conley, 2011)

    • Students with Intellectual Disability

      • Academic Access

      • Career Development

      • Social Network

      • Self Determination

      • Integration with College Systems & Practices

      • Coordination and Collaboration

    NSCS GSEG


    Survey findings on college programs for students with intellectual disability think college 2009

    Survey Findings on College Programs for Students with Intellectual Disability(Think College, 2009)


    Post secondary demonstration sites focus on

    Post SecondaryDemonstration sites focus on

    • Academic and instructional strategies

      • Peer tutoring, mentoring, coaching

    • Employment/Career Strategies

      • Practicum and internship opportunities

      • Invite vocational rehabilitation professionals

      • Campus career center

    • Independent Living/Residential Strategies

    • Social Strategies


    Intellectual disability is not synonymous with significant cognitive disability

    “Intellectual disability” is NOT synonymous with “significant cognitive disability”


    Meet megan

    Meet Megan


    Meet bruce

    Meet Bruce


    Meet bruce after intervention

    Meet Bruce after Intervention


    Ccr so now what direction

    CCR: So, now what direction?


    Dlm draft assumptions

    DLM Draft Assumptions

    For college & Career readiness, students with significant cognitive disabilities need:

    • Higher expectations

    • Post-secondary opportunities

    • More than traditional academics

    • Access, accommodations, and supports


    Ncsc partners are discussing

    NCSC partners are discussing:

    • Maximize Communicative Competence

    • Full access to the academic content for life long learning

    • Development of appropriate social skills

    • Development of independent work behaviors

    • Development of support access skills

      (Discussion based on Kearns, Kleinert, Harrison, Shepard-Jones, Hall, Jones 2011)


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