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Periodic Table Web Elements. Daniel Leppke 1 st Hour. Hydrogen (H). Hydrogen was discovered by Henry Cavendish at 1766 in London, England. Origin of name: from the Greek words "hydro" and "genes" meaning "water" and "generator“. Standard state: gas at 298 K. Lithium (Li).

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Periodic Table Web Elements

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Periodic TableWeb Elements

Daniel Leppke

1st Hour


Hydrogen (H)

  • Hydrogen was discovered by Henry Cavendish at 1766 in London, England. Origin of name: from the Greek words "hydro" and "genes" meaning "water" and "generator“.

  • Standard state: gas at 298 K


Lithium (Li)

  • Lithium was discovered by Johan August Arfvedson at 1817 in Stockholm, Sweden. Origin of name: from the Greek word "lithos" meaning "stone", apparently because it was discovered from a mineral source whereas the other two common Group 1 elements, sodium and potassium, were discovered from plant sources.

    • Standard state: solid at 298 K


Ununtrium (Uut)

  • Ununtrium was discovered by not yet discovered at 2003 in not yet discovered. Origin of name: temporary systematic IUPAC nomenclature.

  • Standard state: presumably a solid at 298 K


Flerovium (Uuq)

  • Flerovium was discovered by Workers at the Nuclear Institute at Dubna, Russia at 1998 in Dubna, Russia. Origin of name: flerovium (atomic symbol Fl) was named for the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions where element 114 was synthesized. Georgiy N. Flerov (1913-1990) was an eminent physicist who discovered the spontaneous fission of uranium. He was the founder of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

  • Standard state: presumably a solid at 298 K


Scandium (Sc)

  • Scandium was discovered by Lars Fredrik Nilson at 1879 in Sweden. Origin of name: from the Latin word "Scandia" meaning "Scandinavia".

  • Standard state: solid at 298 K


Germanium (Ge)

  • Germanium was discovered by Clemens Winkler at 1886 in Germany. Origin of name: from the Latin word "Germania" meaning "Germany".

  • Standard state: solid at 298 K


Livermorium (Uuh)

  • Livermorium was discovered by Yu.Ts. Oganessian, V.K. Utyonkov, Yu.V. Lobanov, F.Sh. Abdullin, A.N. Polyakov, I.V. Shirokovsky, Yu.S. Tsyganov, G.G. Gulbekian, S.L. Bogomolov, B.N. Gikal, A.N. Mezentsev, S. Iliev, V.G. Subbotin, A.M. Sukhov, O.V. Ivanov, G.V. Buklanov, K.Subotic, M.G. Itkis, K.J. Moody, J.F. Wild, N.J. Stoyer, M.A. Stoyer, R.W. Lougheed, C.A. Laue, Ye.A. Karelin, and A.N. Tatarinov at 2000 in Dubna, Russia. Origin of name: temporary systematic IUPAC nomenclature.

    Standard state: presumably a solid at 298 K


Radium (Ra)

  • Radium was discovered by Pierre and Marie Curie at 1898 in France. Origin of name: from the Latin word "radius" meaning "ray".

  • Standard state: solid at 298 K


Molybdenum (Mo)

  • Molybdenum was discovered by Carl William Scheele at 1781 in Sweden. Origin of name: from the Greek word "molybdos" meaning "lead".

  • Melting point: 2896 [or 2623 °C (4753 °F)] K


Rhenium (Re)

  • Rhenium was discovered by Walter Noddack, Ida Tacke, Otto Berg at 1925 in Germany. Origin of name: from the Greek word "Rhenus" meaning river "Rhine“.

  • Melting point: 3459 [or 3186 °C (5767 °F)] K


Antimony (Sb)

  • Antimony was discovered by Known since ancient times at no data in not known. Origin of name: from the Greek words "anti + monos" meaning "not alone" (the origin of the symbol Sb comes from the Latin word "stibium").

  • point: 903.78 [or 630.63 °C (1167.13 °F)] K


Thallium (Tl)

  • Thallium was discovered by Sir William Crookes at 1861 in England. Origin of name: from the Greek word "thallos" meaning "green twig" or green shoot.

  • Melting point: 577 [or 304 °C (579 °F)] K


Silver (Ag)

  • Silver was discovered by Known since ancient times at no data in not known. Origin of name: from the Anglo-Saxon word "siolfur" meaning "silver" (the origin of the symbol Ag comes from the Latin word "argentum" meaning "silver").

  • •Melting point: 1234.93 [or 961.78 °C (1763.2 °F)] K


Osmium (Os)

  • Osmium was discovered by Smithson Tennant at 1803 in England. Origin of name: from the Greek word "osme" meaning "smell“.

  • Melting point: 3306 [or 3033 °C (5491 °F)] K


Lead (PB)

  • Lead was discovered by Known since ancient times at no data in not known. Origin of name: from the Anglo-Saxon word "lead; Latin, plumbum" (the origin of the symbol Pb is the Latin word "plumbum" meaning "liquid silver".

  • Melting point: 600.61 [or 327.46 °C (621.43 °F)] K


Silicon (Si)

  • Silicon was discovered by Jöns Jacob Berzelius at 1824 in Sweden. Origin of name: from the Latin word "silicis" meaning "flint".

  • Melting point: 1687 [or 1414 °C (2577 °F)] K


Cobalt (Co)

  • Cobalt was discovered by Georg Brandt at 1735 in Sweden. Origin of name: from the German word "kobald" meaning "goblin" or evil spirit.

  • Melting point: 1768 [or 1495 °C (2723 °F)] K


Chromium (Cr)

  • Chromium was discovered by Louis-Nicholas Vauquelin at 1797 in France. Origin of name: from the Greek word "chroma" meaning "colour", named for the many coloured compounds known for chromium.

  • Melting point: 2180 [or 1907 °C (3465 °F)] K


Lutetium (Lu)

  • Lutetium was discovered by Georges Urbain and Carl Auer von Welsbach at 1907 in France, Germany. Origin of name: from the Greek word "Lutetia" meaning "Paris".

  • Melting point: 1925 [or 1652 °C (3006 °F)] K


Iridium (Ir)

  • Iridium was discovered by Smithson Tennant, Antoine Fourcroy, Louis Vanquelin, Hippolyte Collet-Descotils at 1803 in England, France. Origin of name: from the Greek word "iris" meaning "rainbow".

  • Melting point: 2739 [or 2466 °C (4471 °F)] K


Magnesium (Mg)

  • Magnesium was discovered by Sir Humphrey Davy at 1755 in England. Origin of name: from the Greek word "Magnesia", a district of Thessaly.

  • Melting point: 923 [or 650 °C (1202 °F)]


Tantalum (Ta)

  • Tantalum was discovered by Anders Ekeberg at 1802 in Sweden. Origin of name: from the Greek word "Tantalos" meaning "father of Niobe" (Greek mythology, (tantalum is closely related to niobium in the periodic table).

  • Melting point: 3290 [or 3017 °C (5463 °F)] K


Dubnium (Db)

  • Dubnium was discovered by Workers at the Nuclear Institute at Dubna, and the University of California, Berkeley, USA. at 1967 in USSR, United States. Origin of name: the origin of the name dubnium is the Joint Nuclear Institute at Dubna", an institute heavily involved in the search for heavy elements.

  • Standard state: presumably a solid at 298 K


Manganese (Mn)

  • Manganese was discovered by Johann Gahn at 1774 in Sweden. Origin of name: from the Latin word "magnes" meaning "magnet", or "magnesia nigri" meaning "black magnesia" (MnO2).

  • Melting point: 1519 [or 1246 °C (2275 °F)] K.


Darmstadtium (Ds)

  • Darmstadtium was discovered by S. Hofmann, V. Ninov, F. P. Hessberger, P. Armbruster, H. Folger, G. Münzenberg, H. J. Schött, and others at 1994 in GesellschaftfürSchwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany.. Origin of name: the name darmstadtium lies within the long established tradition of naming an element after the place of its discovery, Darmstadt, in Germany.

  • Colour: unknown, but probably metallic and silvery white or grey in appearance


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