Ms freda d brown school library media specialist kahs
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 12

Ms. Freda D. Brown, School Library Media Specialist KAHS PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 67 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Download Presentation

Ms. Freda D. Brown, School Library Media Specialist KAHS

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Ms freda d brown school library media specialist kahs

Research Tips and Accessing Online Databases CCS: Research to Build and Present Knowledge8.Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.9.Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Ms. Freda D. Brown,

School Library Media Specialist

KAHS


Ms freda d brown school library media specialist kahs

Search (sûrch) v. to look for or examine in an effort to discover something.Your information need drives your search…


Ms freda d brown school library media specialist kahs

Objectives: SWBAT

-identify appropriate strategies for selecting search terms-identify types of information available in library databases

-locate citation information from sources


From topic to keyword to resource database

FROM TOPIC TO KEYWORD TO RESOURCE DATABASE

Essential Questions: How many of you have developed questions about your research topics?

Obtain background information about your topic that answers the questions Who, What, Why, and How. Tip: This helps to focus your search and identify more specific resources.

Example Topic: Privacy Issues

Research Question: Does the U.S. Constitution outline its citizens’privacy rights?

Key words: U.S. Constitution, U.S. Citizen, privacy rights Tip: Choose the important nouns in your question.


What is a database

What is a database?

Database: an organized collection of information, usually pertaining to a particular subject.

The following are usually always true of databases:

They save you time as you search

The information is most up-to-date

The information is credible and has been reviewed by a panel of experts in a given field.

They provide MLA citations for your Works Cited Page

The provide bibliographic leads to other sources that might help you in your research.


Ms freda d brown school library media specialist kahs

http://www2.youseemore.com/cps/linkinclude.asp


What is a database1

What is a database?

Database: an organized collection of information, usually pertaining to a particular subject.

The following are usually always true of databases:

They save you time as you search

The information is most up-to-date

The information is credible and has been reviewed by a panel of experts in a given field.

They provide MLA citations for your Works Cited Page

The provide bibliographic leads to other sources that might help you in your research.


A word about peer reviewed journals

A Word About Peer Reviewed Journals

  • What Does "Peer Reviewed" or "Refereed" Mean?

  • Peer Review is a process that journals use to ensure the articles they publish represent the best scholarship currently available. When an article is submitted to a peer reviewed journal, the editors send it out to other scholars in the same field (the author's peers) to get their opinion on the quality of the scholarship, its relevance to the field, its appropriateness for the journal, etc.

  • Publications that don't use peer review (Time, Cosmo, Salon) just rely on the judgement of the editors whether an article is up to snuff or not. That's why you can't count on them for solid, scientific scholarship.

  • How do I know if a journal is peer reviewed?

  • Usually, you can tell just by looking. A scholarly journal is visibly different from other magazines, but occasionally it can be hard to tell, or you just want to be extra-certain. In that case, you turn to Ulrich's Periodical Directory Online. Just type the journal's title into the text box, hit "submit," and you'll get back a report that will tell you (among other things) whether the journal contains articles that are peer reviewed, or, as Ulrich's calls it, Refereed.

Source: "University of Texas Libraries." Articles from a Journal. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2013.


Magazines vs journals

MAGAZINES VS. JOURNALS

Source: "University of Texas Libraries." Articles from a Journal. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2013.


  • Login