putting students first doesn t mean letting students by
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Putting Students First Doesn’t Mean Letting Students By

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Putting Students First Doesn’t Mean Letting Students By. Paul Sopcak & Susan Mills MacEwan University [email protected] Overview. Factors that deter faculty from buying into the “culture of AI” and its related procedures Potential consequences of faculty “doing their own thing”

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Presentation Transcript
overview
Overview
  • Factors that deter faculty from buying into the “culture of AI” and its related procedures
  • Potential consequences of faculty “doing their own thing”
  • Ways to encourage faculty to buy into and promote a culture of AI that puts students first
    • Administrative ways
    • Principled ways
  • Conclusion: Putting students first does not have to mean letting them by
factors keeping faculty from buying in
Factors Keeping Faculty From Buying-In
  • Time
  • Fear of ruining student’s career/future
  • Lack of knowledge of policy and procedures
  • Feeling of breach of trust
  • Feeling of violating their teaching mandate/vocation
  • Feeling of turning their students in/hypocritical
  • Resistance to what is perceived as a culture that puts rules, not students, first
dangers of faculty not buying in
Dangers of Faculty Not Buying-In
  • Inconsistent Dealings with AI violations across institution
  • Undermining culture of AI and student buy-in
  • Undermining student’s rights
  • Making institution vulnerable to lawsuits
administrative ways of encouraging faculty buy in
Administrative Ways of Encouraging Faculty Buy-In
  • Make procedure and resources intuitive, easy, quick (templates and flowcharts)
  • Educate faculty on curriculum development, classroom management, policy, procedures, statistics, and dispel myths
  • Put penalty decisions for first offenders in their hands and remind them that they are in control
  • Get provost or dean to stress importance of following policy procedures
principled ways of encouraging faculty buy in
Principled Ways of Encouraging Faculty Buy-In
  • Stress potential consequences of “dealing with cheaters in their own way”
  • Stress their teaching mandate/vocation and the learning opportunity that AI violations provide
  • Remind faculty that half of AI violations are unintentional (lack of skill & knowledge)
  • Encourage faculty to treat AI violations as policy violations rather than ethical transgressions, when appropriate
  • Get faculty to reflect on the power of their language to encourage or stifle learning: “dishonesty,” “misconduct,” “penalty” should not be used lightly, for instance
possible objection and response
Possible Objection and Response
  • Objection: “We are letting students by, when we focus on prevention and education over punishment.”
  • Response: 2-step approach (separate procedures for first and multiple violations) ensures:
    • Penalties for multiple cheaters are appropriate and consistent across the institution
    • Faculty has control over consequences for first (not “serious”) violations
    • Best of both worlds with a focus on student learning
conclusion
Conclusion
  • Being fair, consistent, sensitive to unintentional violations, and focusing on the learning experience, puts students first and does not have to mean being “soft” or letting students by
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