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BEFORE YOU GO BEING PREPARED FOR YOUR ELECTIVE HAZARDS ARE BEST ANTICIPATED AND AVOIDED PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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BEFORE YOU GO BEING PREPARED FOR YOUR ELECTIVE HAZARDS ARE BEST ANTICIPATED AND AVOIDED BUT YOU NEED TO KNOW WHAT YOU WOULD DO IN AN EMERGENCY. HIV. PERSONAL SAFETY – traffic accidents. PERSONAL SAFETY – violence and robbery.

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BEFORE YOU GO BEING PREPARED FOR YOUR ELECTIVE HAZARDS ARE BEST ANTICIPATED AND AVOIDED

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Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

BEFORE YOU GO

BEING PREPARED FOR YOUR ELECTIVE

HAZARDS ARE BEST ANTICIPATED AND AVOIDED

BUT YOU NEED TO KNOW WHAT YOU WOULD DO IN AN EMERGENCY


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

HIV


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

PERSONAL SAFETY – traffic accidents


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

PERSONAL SAFETY – violence and robbery


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

TRAVEL INSURANCE – covering electives, not ordinary travel insurance,

must cover transportation home in case of accident or illness.

MEDICOLEGAL COVER – if you need it, often free from one of the defence societies

VISA – in countries which require it; a tourist visa is often sufficient, but check

LETTER OF INTRODUCTION – from the Dean of the Medical School

COPIES OF ALL IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS – including passport and flight tickets,

and accessible to you in case of loss

SELF-MEDICATION KIT – for minor illnesses and accidents

PEP – in case of needlestick injury or splash exposure

IMMUNISATIONS/VACCINATIONS – as appropriate for the country visited. Do not

leave to the last minute. The Brownlee Centre will not accommodate you.

ALTERNATIVE SUPPLY OF CASH – in case of robbery


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

PERSONAL SAFETY ISSUES

Check FCO advice before you go

Know the territory; take local advice

Arrange transfer from airport to the elective setting

Keep company you know

Be wary of strangers who are too friendly

Keep to well-lit public places; public roads (avoid short-cuts); know your route and don’t

consult a map in public

Obtain secure accommodation, keep doors locked

Don’t be a target for pickpockets

Carry only small amounts of money

Do not flaunt personal possessions (expensive watches, jewellery, cameras, mobile phones)

Don’t keep all your money in one place

Take malaria prophylaxis for the full period; wear appropriate clothing

Avoid alcohol excess – you are not in Glasgow. Illegal drugs are an absolute No

Don’t swim in freshwater (e.g. Lake Malawi – risk of schistosomiasis)


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

CONTACT NUMBERS

Supervisor

Where you would go for local medical help

British embassy/consulate/high commission – contact in serious emergencies

(students who are British nationals can register with the LOCATE service at

http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/travel-and-living-abroad/staying-safe/Locate/)

University of Glasgow emergency contact number – will take details

and pass on to your stated emergency contact

Travel insurance company

Telephone number for reporting stolen plastic cards

Be sure that family/next of kin know where you are and can contact you

urgently if necessary


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF YOU :-

find on arrival that arrangements have changed or fallen through

have a needlestick injury

are bitten by a dog

are robbed

lose your passport (BHC)

find yourself in jail (BHC)

become a hospital patient

have a high fever

fall ill

are involved in a traffic accident

have been exposed to TB risks (see Occupational Health on return)

need to claim from your insurance (keep all receipts)


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

WHAT TO DO AFTER A NEEDLESTICK INJURY

Wash area thoroughly with soap and water and encourage wound to bleed

Report the incident to a senior person in the hospital where you are working

Establish the status of the patient (Hepatitis and HIV). If status is unknown get

consent for a blood test. Start post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) within one hour

of exposure. Carry one tablet with you at all times to allow a quick response if

necessary.

Keep your travel insurer informed (policies usually require that you keep the insurer

informed if you seek medical advice. Do this and they cannot say they have not been informed.

If patient is negative for both hepatitis and HIV, stop PEP. Continue and

complete your elective.

If patient is positive for either, you are advised to return home as soon as possible

Obtain advice from a local UK infectious disease department (e.g. the Brownlee)


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

CULTURAL ISSUES

Remember that you are a guest, benefitting from the generosity

and hospitality of your hosts

Can you say simple things in the local language?

Dress appropriately

Understand local customs

How to respond to requests for money (e.g. from hospital staff, patients, beggars, priests in temples)

Don’t take Scottish banknotes

Be careful in talking to strangers on political and religious issues

Ask permission before taking photographs of people

Stay true to your own values, but do not try to convert others – other cultures have different attitudes to patient consent, autonomy and privacy


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

PROFESSIONAL ISSUES

Be adaptable

Inform yourself about local safety procedures

Stay within your level of clinical competence

Let your supervisor know what you can and cannot do

Only carry out new procedures under appropriate supervision

Be prepared to say “No”, politely and without causing difficulty

Confine your practical involvement in clinical care to situations that are safe, protected

and predictable

Your insurance may not cover you for being out of your depth

When asked for advice by local staff, be aware that what you say may be taken

as being true; it may be better to say that you are a medical student and do not know

Avoid clinical responsibility beyond your level

As in the UK, you have a duty of care to provide first aid when witness to emergencies,

with the guardian principle – First do no harm.


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

FOOD SAFETY AND HYGIENE

Ensure hands are clean and dry when handling food

Boil water, or filter or chemically treat

Do not drink in treated water (ice cubes, ices)

Protect food from flies

Only eat food you know is freshly prepared and cooked

Cooked food should be placed in sealed container in fridge, if not eaten straight away

Do not eat meat that is undercooked (i.e. red)

Do not eat shellfish

Fruit and vegetables should be freshly cooked or peeled

Do not eat unpasteurised milk or milk products (e.g. ice cream, yogurt, cheese)

Beware of hospitality: if the food is not safe, refuse it politely. If unavoidable,

eat a very small amount

Select food from menu that is likely to be safe, not what you think will taste good

Do not take chances. If unsure at all, miss the meal.


Before you go being prepared for your elective hazards are best anticipated and avoided

CHECKLIST

Stethoscope and ophthalmoscope*

Oxford handbooks of clinical medicine and specialities

BNF*

Old trainers (=theatre shoes)*

Lonely Planets guidebook (up to date)

Torch

Candle and matches

Sink plug

Gifts :pens, crayons and paper for paediatrics ward*

obstetrics dates chart/wheel*

Extras : photos of home

Skipping rope or other small “Keep fit things” (it may not be safe to go for a run)

Radio*

Loo paper

Alarm clock

* Be prepared to leave as gifts to the hospital


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