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Discrete Mathematics – CIS166. Text Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications (6 th Edition) Kenneth H. Rosen Chapter 10: Trees By Chuck Allison Modified by Longin Jan Latecki, Temple University. Section 10.1. Introduction to Trees. Definition:.

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Discrete mathematics cis166

Discrete Mathematics – CIS166

Text

Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications (6th Edition)

Kenneth H. Rosen

Chapter 10: Trees

By Chuck Allison

Modified by Longin Jan Latecki,

Temple University


Section 10 1

Section 10.1

Introduction to Trees


Definition

Definition:

A tree is a connected undirected graph with no simple circuits.

Recall: A circuit is a path of length >=1 that begins and ends a the same vertex.


Discrete mathematics cis166

d

d


Tournament trees

Alice

Antonia

Anita

Abigail

Amy

Agnes

Angela

Audrey

Alice

Abigail

Agnes

Angela

Alice

Angela

Alice

Tournament Trees

A common form of tree used in everyday life is the tournament tree, used to describe the outcome of a series of games, such as a tennis tournament.


A family tree

Gaea

Ocean

Phoebe

Cronus

Zeus

Poseidon

Demeter

Pluto

Leto

Iapetus

Apollo

Atlas

Prometheus

Persephone

A Family Tree

Much of the tree terminology derives from family trees.


Ancestor tree

Iphigenia

Clytemnestra

Agamemnon

Leda

Tyndareus

Aerope

Atreus

Catreus

Ancestor Tree

An inverted family tree. Important point - it is a binary tree.


Forest

Forest

Graphs containing no simple circuits that are not connected, but each connected component is a tree.


Theorem

Theorem

An undirected graph is a tree if and only if there is a unique simple path between any two of its vertices.


Rooted trees

Rooted Trees

Once a vertex of a tree has been designated as the root of the tree, it is possible to assign direction to each of the edges.


Rooted trees1

a

e

c

b

d

g

f

Rooted Trees

g

e

f

b

d

a

c


Discrete mathematics cis166

root node

a

internal vertex

parent of g

c

b

d

e

f

g

leaf

siblings

h

i


Discrete mathematics cis166

a

c

b

d

e

f

g

h

i

ancestors of h and i


Discrete mathematics cis166

a

c

b

d

e

f

g

subtree with b as its root

h

i

subtree with c as its root


M ary trees

m-ary trees

A rooted tree is called an m-ary tree if every internal vertex has no more than m children. The tree is called a full m-arytree if every internal vertex has exactly m children. An m-ary tree with m=2 is called a binary tree.


Ordered rooted tree

Ordered Rooted Tree

An ordered rooted tree is a rooted tree where the children of each internal vertex are ordered. Ordered trees are drawn so that the children of each internal vertex are shown in order from left to right.


Properties of trees

Properties of Trees

A tree with n vertices has n-1 edges.


Properties of trees1

Properties of Trees

A full m-ary tree with i internal vertices contains n = mi+1 vertices.


Properties of trees2

Properties of Trees

A full m-ary tree with

(i) n vertices has i = (n-1)/m internal vertices and l = [(m-1)n+1]/m leaves.

(ii) i internal vertices has n = mi + 1 vertices and l = (m-1)i + 1 leaves.

(iii) l leaves has n = (ml - 1)/(m-1) vertices and i = (l-1)/(m-1) internal vertices.


Proof

Proof

  • We know n = mi+1 (previous theorem) and n = l+i,

  • n – no. vertices

  • i – no. internal vertices

  • l – no. leaves

  • For example, i = (n-1)/m


Properties of trees3

level 3

Properties of Trees

The level of a vertex v in a rooted tree is the length of the unique path from the root to this vertex.

level 2


Properties of trees4

Properties of Trees

The height of a rooted tree is the maximum of the levels of vertices.


Properties of trees5

Properties of Trees

A rooted m-ary tree of height h is called balanced if all leaves are at levels h or h-1.


Properties of trees6

Properties of Trees

There are at most mhleaves in an m-ary tree of height h.


Properties of trees7

Properties of Trees

If an m-ary tree of height h has l leaves, then


Proof1

Proof

  • From previous theorem:


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