Microclimates
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Microclimates . By Lily Salmon. Introduction . For my summer project I have decided to position 6 microclimates in my garden and monitor their progress over the course of two weeks. As well as the main part of the project I also did a few things on the side:

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Microclimates

Microclimates

By Lily Salmon


Introduction

Introduction

For my summer project I have decided to position 6 microclimates in

my garden and monitor their progress over the course of two weeks.

As well as the main part of the project I also did a few things on the side:

  • For the first extra part of my project I have taken a few questions and used the data I have collected to answer them:

  • Where would be the best place to grow tomatoes?

  • Where would be the best place to put a washing line?

  • Where would be the best place to put a garden chair if you like the sun?

  • Where would be the best place for moss to grow?

  • Where would be the best place to grow a tricyrtis* (toad lily)?

  • Where would be the best place to grow a convallaria majalis* (lily of the valley?

  • Also for each microclimate I have chosen 5 days out of the 14

    and collected their temperature 6 different times a day.

    The reason I added this extra part to the experiment was because I thought it would be interesting, and helpful, to see how long it takes for each microclimate to warm up at the beginning of the day and cool down at the end.

* - I looked these up on a gardening site


Weather tables

Weather tables

I got the information for these tables from a general weather site. I thought it would be interesting to compare them with the data I collected myself.


Rainfall

Key:

☻ = a tick

-- = a cross

Rainfall

These tables are made data that I collected from a local weather site. I thought that it would be interesting to compare them to the data that I collected from my microclimates.


My plan of the garden this is the first part of the garden

My plan of the garden –this is the first part of the garden

VP

4

5

WL

3

CY

D

MH

1

TL

N

2


Plan of the garden part 2

Plan of the garden – part 2

N

6

P1

MH

P2


Microclimates

Key

5 = Microclimate 5

6 = Microclimate 6

MH = My house

WL = Washing Line

CY = Courtyard

P1 = Pond 1

P2 = Pond 2

VP = vegetable patch

TL = Garden table

D = driveway

1 = Microclimate 1

2 = Microclimate 2

3 = Microclimate 3

4 = Microclimate 4


Microclimate 1 sunny no wind

Microclimate 1: Sunny, no wind

I placed Microclimate 1 in a sunny area that was protected from the wind. The fact that this microclimate is protected from the wind but is still sunny means that it is the perfect place for allsorts of different plant types (like lavender) to grow.

As there was no wind it meant that this microclimate was one of the warmest of the lot. Here is some data that I collected from microclimate 1 over the course of 2 weeks:


Information on microclimate 1

Information on Microclimate 1

I placed microclimate 1 in a small glade between a few trees so that it was protected from the wind and rain but was still open to absorbing rays of sunlight. The microclimate faced west and was situated on the ground.

  • The area where this microclimate is placed is the perfect place to situate a garden chair for someone as it is nice and warm but not windy.

  • The equipment that I used for this part of the experiment was:

  • A thermometer


Information on microclimate 11

Information on Microclimate 1

I chose five days out of the 2 weeks (in this case Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday in the first week) and collected the microclimates temperature 6 times a day. I did this test so that I could see how long it takes for each microclimate to warm up at the beginning of the day and cool down at the end.

Week 1 - Day 1 -Monday

These charts show that, on average, it takes it about the same time each day to warm up (in the mornings) and cool down (in the evenings).

On average it seems to take around 8 hours to warm up from the days coolest temperature to the days peak temperature.

Also it takes around 7 hours for the day to cool down from the days peak temperature to the evenings coolest.

Week 1 – Day 2 - Tuesday


Microclimates

Information on Microclimate 1

Week 1 – Day 3 – Wednesday

Week 1 – Day 4 - Thursday

Week 1 – Day 5 – Friday


Microclimate 2 shaded no wind

Microclimate 2: Shaded, no wind

As microclimate 2 was in the shade it was much cooler than microclimate 1. Here is some data that I from microclimate 2 collected over the course of 2 weeks:

I placed Microclimate 2 in a shaded area that was protected from the wind. The fact that this microclimate is both protected from the wind and the sun means that it is not a good place for many different plant types to grow.


Information on microclimate 2

Information on Microclimate 2

I placed microclimate 2 behind a large tree so it was protected from the rain and the wind. The microclimate faces North and is situated on the ground near a large batch of brambles.

Where microclimate 2 is positioned is the perfect place to grow a convallaria majalis (lily of the valley) as it is shaded, cool and protected from the wind.

  • The equipment that I used for this part of the experiment was:

  • A thermometer

Traditionally, Lily of the Valley is sold in the streets of France on May 1.

Convallaria majalis – Lily of the Valley


Information on microclimate 21

Information on Microclimate 2

As part of my experiment I chose five days out of the 2 weeks (in this case Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday in the second week) and collected the microclimates temperature 6 times a day.

I did this test so that I could see how long it takes for each microclimate to warm up at the beginning of the day and cool down at the end.

Week 2 – Day 1 - Monday

Week 2 – Day 2 - Tuesday


Microclimates

Information on Microclimate 2

These charts show that it takes (on average) about the same time for each day to warm up (in the mornings). On each chart there seems to be an average cool down time (in the evenings).

On average it seems to take around 8 – 8½ hours to warm up from the days coolest morning temperature to the days peak temperature.

Also it takes around 6 - 6½ hours for the day to cool down from the days peak temperature to the evenings coolest.

Week 2 – Day 3 – Wednesday

Week 2 – Day 4 – Thursday

Week 2 – Day 5 – Friday


Microclimate 3 sunny wind

Microclimate 3: Sunny, wind

As microclimate 3 was placed in a sunny and windy area it was cooler than microclimate 1 but warmer than microclimate 2. Here is some data that I collected from microclimate 3 over the course of 2 weeks:


Information on microclimate 3

Information on Microclimate 3

I placed microclimate 3 in the middle of a large field so it had direct contact with both the sun and wind. The microclimate faces east which means that it has sun all day round.

  • The area where this microclimate is situated is the perfect area to place washing line as it is warm (because of the full exposure to sunlight) and also windy.

  • The equipment that I used for this part of the experiment was:

  • A weather vane

  • An anemometer

  • A thermometer


Information on microclimate 31

Information on Microclimate 3

As part of my research for microclimate 3 I chose five days out of the 2 weeks (in this case Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday in the second week) and collected the microclimates temperature 6 different times a day. I did this test so that I could see how long it takes for each microclimate to warm up at the beginning of the day and cool down at the end.

Week 2 – Day 1 – Monday

These charts show that it takes (on average) about the same time for each day to warm up (in the mornings). On each chart there also seems to be an average cool down time (in the evenings).

Week 2 – Day 1 – Monday


Microclimates

Information on Microclimate 3

On average it seems to take around 8 – 8½ hours to warm up from the days coolest temperature in the morning to the days peak temperature.

Also it takes around 6 - 6½ hours for the day to cool down from the days peak temperature to the evenings coolest.

Week 2 – Day 3 – Wednesday

Week 2 – Day 4 – Thursday

Week 2 – Day 5 – Friday


Microclimate 4 shaded wind

Microclimate 4: Shaded , wind

As microclimate 4 was in the shade and had contact with the wind it was one of the coolest out of all the spots that I placed my microclimates in. Here is some data that I from microclimate 4 collected over the course of 2 weeks.


Information on microclimate 4

Information on Microclimate 4

I placed Microclimate 4 in a large field but behind a large tree so that it was in a windy but shaded area. The microclimate is facing south which means that (because of the large tree in front of it) it does not get any warmth or sunlight at any part of the day.

  • The area where this microclimate is placed is the perfect area to plant a toad lily as these plants thrive in shaded windy areas.

  • The equipment that I used for this part of the experiment was:

  • A weather vane

  • An anemometer

  • A thermometer

A tricyrtis (toad lily)


Information on microclimate 41

Information on Microclimate 4

As part of my research for microclimate 4 I chose five days out of the 2 weeks (in this case Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday in the first week) and collected the microclimates temperature 6 different times a day. I did this test so that I could see how long it takes for each microclimate to warm up at the beginning of the day and cool down at the end.

Week 1 – Day 1 - Wednesday

These charts show that it takes (on average) about the same time for each day to warm up (in the mornings). On each chart there seems to be an average cool down time (in the evenings).

Week 1 – Day 2 - Thursday


Microclimates

Information on Microclimate 4

On average it seems to take around 8½ - 9 hours to warm up from the days coolest morning temperature to the days peak temperature.

Also it takes around 5½ - 6 hours for the day to cool down from the days peak temperature to the evenings coolest.

Week 1 – Day 3 – Friday

Week 1 – Day 4 – Saturday

Week 1 – Day 5 – Sunday


Microclimate 5 sunny wet

Microclimate 5: Sunny, wet

I placed Microclimate 5 in a sunny area that was also wet. The fact that this microclimate is sunny and wet means that it is the perfect place for allsorts of different vegetables/fruit types (like tomatoes) to grow.

The combination of the sun’s rays and moisture (from rain) means the area that this microclimate was placed had very rich soil (in this case the vegetable patch). Here is some data that I collected from microclimate 5 over the course of 2 weeks:


Information on microclimate 5

Information on Microclimate 5

I placed Microclimate 5 my family’s vegetable patch so that it was in a warm but wet area that was exposed to sunlight. The microclimate faces south which means that it has sun nearly all day round.

  • The area where this microclimate is placed is the perfect area to plant tomatoes as these plants thrive in warm, wet areas with rich soil.

  • The equipment that I used for this part of the experiment was:

  • A weather vane

  • An anemometer

  • A thermometer

  • A beaker (to collect the rain water)


Information on microclimate 51

Information on Microclimate 5

I chose five days out of the 2 weeks (in this case Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday in the second week) and collected the microclimates temperature 6 times a day. I did this test so that I could see how long it takes for each microclimate to warm up at the beginning of the day and cool down at the end.

Week 2 – Day 1 – Monday

These charts show that it takes (on average) about the same time for each day to warm up (in the mornings). On each chart there seems to be an average cool down time (in the evenings).

Week 2 – Day 2 – Tuesday


Information on microclimate 52

Information on Microclimate 5

On average it seems to take around 8 – 8½ hours to warm up from the days coolest morning temperature to the days peak temperature.

Also it takes around 6 - 6½ hours for the day to cool down from the days peak temperature to the evenings coolest.

Week 2 – Day 3 – Wednesday

Week 2 – Day4 – Thursday

Week 2 – Day 5 - Friday


Microclimate 6 shaded wet

Microclimate 6: Shaded, wet

I placed Microclimate 6 in a shaded area that was also wet. The fact that this microclimate is shaded and wet means that it is the perfect place for allsorts of different types of plants to grow e.g. moss and fungi.


Information on microclimate 6

Information on Microclimate 6

I placed microclimate 6 is a cool dark spot near a stream. It is surrounded by close-knit trees so that it was protected from the wind and from sunlight. Microclimate 6 was placed so that it faced east. The area where microclimate 6 is situated would be the perfect place for moss, ferns, mushrooms and other types of Bryophyta.

  • The area where this microclimate is placed is the perfect area for moss and other types of fungi and other as these plants thrive in warm, wet areas with rich soil.

  • The equipment that I used for this part of the experiment was:

  • A weather vane

  • An anemometer

  • A thermometer

  • A beaker (to collect the rain water)


Information on microclimate 61

Information on Microclimate 6

I chose five days out of the 2 weeks (in this case Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday in the first week) and collected the microclimates temperature 6 times a day. I did this test so that I could see how long it takes for each microclimate to warm up at the beginning of the day and cool down at the end.

Week 1 – Day 1 – Monday

These charts show that it takes (on average) about the same time for each day to warm up (in the mornings). On each chart there seems to be an average cool down time (in the evenings).

Week 1 – Day 2 – Tuesday


Information on microclimate 62

Information on Microclimate 6

On average it seems to take around 8½– 9 hours to warm up from the days coolest morning temperature to the days peak temperature.

Also it takes around 5½ - 6 hours for the day to cool down from the days peak temperature to the evenings coolest.

Week 1 – Day 3 – Wednesday

Week 1 – Day 4 – Thursday

Week 1 – Day 5 – Friday


Microclimates

Equipment I used:

  • An Anemometer

  • To make my anemometer I needed:

  • five paper cups

  • two straight plastic straws

  • a pin

  • scissors

  • To make an anemometer:

  • Take four of the paper cups and, using the hole punch, made a hole in each one just below the rim.

  • Take the fifth cup and made four equal sized holes below the rim (again with the whole punch).

  • Then punch a hole in the centre of the bottom of the cup.

  • Take one of the four cups and push a straw through the hole. Fold the end of the straw, and staple it to the side of the cup across from the hole. Repeat this for another one-hole cup with the second straw.

  • Now slide one cup (with the straw) through two opposite holes in the cup with four holes.

  • Push another one-hole cup onto the end of the straw.

  • Bend the straw and staple it to the one-hole cup, making certain that the cup faces in the opposite direction from the first cup.

  • Repeat this procedure using the other cup and straw assembly and the remaining one-hole cup.

  • Align the four cups so that their open ends face in the same direction (clockwise or anticlockwise) around the centre cup.

  • Push the straight pin through the two straws where they intersect.

  • Push the eraser end of the pencil through the bottom hole in the centre cup.

  • Push the pin into the end of the pencil eraser as far as it will go.

  • a hole punch

  • a small stapler

  • a sharp pencil with an eraser


Microclimates

Equipment I used:

  • A Weather Vane

  • To make a weather vane I needed:

  • paper and pencil

  • scissors

  • cardboard

  • compass

  • To make a weather vane:

  • With the scissors, carefully cut an arrow with a tab from the cardboard, as shown in the image above.

  • Bend the tab slightly so the arrow turns easily when you put it in one end of the straw.

  • Put the other end of the straw in the bottle.

  • Remove enough rocks from the pan to make room for the bottle.

  • Pile the rocks back around the bottle so it won't be blown over.

  • A compass always point north.

  • Use your compass to find north, and then mark the four sides of the bottle E, W, N, and S with a felt pen.

  • Set your weather vane in a high place such as the top of a playhouse or a slide.

  • Make sure it does not wobble or tilt, and that it catches the slightest breeze.

  • Watch your weather vane closely and then describe how it works.

  • Test it on windy days and again when there is just a light breeze.

  • a plastic soft drink bottle

  • a plastic drinking straw

  • a shallow pan filled with rocks

  • a felt marker pen


My conclusion

My Conclusion

  • I decided to do my summer project about microclimates because I thought it would be informing as well as interesting.

  • Over the two weeks that my project is about I situated and collected data from all of my different microclimates.

  • From this project I wanted to gain skills in research, fieldwork and collecting data. I also wanted to answer the questions that I set myself at the beginning of the project:

  • Where would be the best place to grow tomatoes? Microclimate 5

  • Where would be the best place to put a washing line? Microclimate 3

  • Where would be the best place to put a garden chair if you like the sun? Microclimate 1

  • Where would be the best place for moss to grow? Microclimate 6

  • Where would be the best place to grow a tricyrtis* (toad lily)? Microclimate 4

  • Where would be the best place to grow a convallaria majalis* (lily of the valley)? Microclimate 2

  • I feel that I have benefited from this project in many ways. I feel that I have expanded my knowledge of collecting data, research and fieldwork and also have gained knowledge in making my way around PowerPoint and excel.

  • Things I would change:

  • Next time I do a project I think that it would be an idea to change the length of time and/or the places where the microclimates were placed. Also, I think it would be a good idea to change the area range that I covered. For example it might be interesting to limit myself to an area a few square meters wide and collect the data for those microclimates. Then when I had finished collecting the data I could compare it to the data collected from the project covering a larger amount of ground and see what I can find.


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