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Limits on Emisson from Fe IX - X from the Hot Local Interstellar Medium. Dr. Jeffrey J. Bloch Space and Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos National Laboratory [email protected] Photon spectrum from an optically thin hot plasma as a function of temperature. The arrows

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Limits on emisson from fe ix x from the hot local interstellar medium

Limits on Emisson from Fe IX - X from the Hot Local Interstellar Medium

Dr. Jeffrey J. Bloch

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences Group

Los Alamos National Laboratory

[email protected]

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Photon spectrum from an optically thin hot plasma as a function of temperature. The arrows

indicate the energy centers of the three ALEXIS telescope bandpasses.

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


ALEXIS Satellite function of temperature. The arrows

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


ALEXIS Telescope Cross Section function of temperature. The arrows

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


ALEXIS All-Sky Mission Raw Count Map function of temperature. The arrows

Telescopes 1B, 2B, 3A (171-190 Å) October 1993- November 1997

No Effective Exposure or Background Corrections Performed

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Analysis strategy
Analysis Strategy function of temperature. The arrows

  • Early sky maps showed no correlation with SXRB

  • Complex non-cosmic backgrounds complicated analysis

  • New Strategy: Use whole FOV of ALEXIS telescope as a “Light Bucket” for analysis.

    • Similar resolution to proportional counter maps

    • Use 0.5 second bin total rate scalar data for analysis

  • Constantly scanning mode of operation actually aids in removing local backgrounds.

    • Same point on sky measured many times with different local system parameters

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Calibration strategy
Calibration Strategy function of temperature. The arrows

  • End-to-End model constructed from component calibrations

  • Pencil beam absolute throughput calibrations compared with end-to-end simulations of same measurements. Instrument model adjusted until agreement reached. This determined absolute efficiency on-axis.

  • HZ 43 data used to correct relative vigneting function

  • Corrected Instrument model used to compute area-solid angle product curve.

  • Actual measured cosmic point source count rates compared to predicted rates using EUVE spectra used to verify instrument model.

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


HZ 43 Count Rate as Function of Scan Position in FOV function of temperature. The arrows

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


HZ 43 Count Rate as Function of Time Over Four Years function of temperature. The arrows

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Space and Remote Sensing Sciences function of temperature. The arrows


Comparison of Predicted Source Rates with Actual function of temperature. The arrows

Source Predicted Rate Observed Rate

HZ 43 0.478 0.436 ± 0.03

Alpha Cen 0.0186 0.012 ± 0.004

G191 B2B 0.063 0.066 ± 0.002

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Predicted alexis 1b average sky rate
Predicted ALEXIS 1B Average Sky Rate function of temperature. The arrows

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Complex non cosmic backgrounds
Complex Non-Cosmic Backgrounds function of temperature. The arrows

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Spin period modulation related to ram vector
Spin Period Modulation Related to Ram Vector function of temperature. The arrows

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Modeling the particle background
Modeling the Particle Background function of temperature. The arrows

Count rates under the Aluminum shadow masks on the outer edge of each microchannel plate detector as a function of “L” parameter for all of 1995.

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Modeling the He II 304 Angstrom Background function of temperature. The arrows

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


ALEXIS Telescope Non-Cosmic Background Components function of temperature. The arrows

Anomalous Background (Ion Induced?)

Eliminated When Telescope Look Direction

> 110° From Velocity Vector

Trapped Penetrating Radiation

Rate µ L Value (L<3)

Ions?

Telescope FOV

(50 sec. Rotation)

Fluorescently Scattered He II 304 Å Sunlight

(He II Trapped in Magnetic Field)

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Fitting the Data to a Constant Sky Rate function of temperature. The arrows

The solid histogram shows the distribution of parameter fit values for an average sky flux count rate over 81 datasets (5 days each) that pass the criteria discussed in the text. The dashed histogram shows the distribution that results from the same analysis applied to the same data but that had random count rate values added on to each rate scaler data point whose means were based on the expected count rate values from the global spectral model and the Wisconsin B band sky map. This plot demonstrates that had a cosmic sky flux of the expected magnitude been present in the data, this analysis technique would have detected it.

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Fitting the Data to a Ratio of ALEXIS to Wisconsin B Band Sky Rates

The solid histogram shows the distribution of parameter fit values for an average ratio between an ALEXIS telescope 1B cosmic rate that is proportional to the Wisconsin B band count rate and the actual B band count rate for 5 day datasets that pass the criteria. The dashed histogram shows the distribution that results from the same analysis applied to the same data but that had random count rate values added on to each rate scaler data point whose means were based on the expected count rate values from the global spectral model and the fluxes in the Wisconsin B band map. This shows that had a cosmic sky flux of the expected magnitude and variation been present in the ALEXIS data, this analysis would have correctly recovered the correlation ratio between the two datasets.

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


Acknowledgments Sky Rates

ALEXIS is supported by the Department of Energy.

The ALEXIS/Blackbeard Project Wishes to Thank:

Los Alamos: Ron Aguilar, Frank Ameduri, Dolores Archuleta, Tom Armstrong, Rick Balsano, Al Beldring, Bruce Blevins, George Berzins, Mark Bibeault, Tom Butler , Doug Ciskoski, Don Cobb, Al Criscolo, Jim Devenport, Bob Dingler, Mel Duran, Brad Edwards, Don Enemark, Sandy Fletcher, John Gustafson, Irma Gonzales, Dave Guenther, Matt Hei, Amy McNeil, Dan Holden, Rick Hodson, Mark Hodgson, Meg Kennison, Becky King, Phil Klingner, Cindy Little, Lisa May, Bob Massey, Dave McComas, Jim Miller, Lee Morrison, Carter Munson, Greg Nunz, Gregg Obbink, John Passarelli, Paras Patel, Tim Pfafman, Mick Piotrowski, Bill Priedhorsky, Keri Ramsey, Diane Roussel-Dupre', Sean Ryan, Bob Scarlett, Jim Shipley, April Smith, Barham Smith, Steve Smoogen, Steve Stem, Ernie Serna, Ralph Stiglich, John Sutton, Earl Tech, Mike Ulibarri, Matthew Ward, and Steve Wallin

AeroAstro, Inc., Sandia National Laboratory,

The Space Test Program, NORAD, Space Command,...

And Many More!

Space and Remote Sensing Sciences


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