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Safe Start Promising Approaches. Lynne F. Katz, Ed.D—Linda Ray Center, University of Miami Kristen Kracke, MSW—Office of Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) James Lewis, III, Ph.D—National Center for Children Exposed to Violence (NCCEV), Yale University

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Safe start promising approaches
Safe Start Promising Approaches

Lynne F. Katz, Ed.D—Linda Ray Center, University of Miami

Kristen Kracke, MSW—Office of Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)

James Lewis, III, Ph.D—National Center for Children Exposed to Violence (NCCEV), Yale University

National Training InstituteDecember 1-3, 2006

Albuquerque, NM


Safe start initiative
Safe Start Initiative

Purpose of the Safe Start Initiative is to prevent and reduce the impact of family and community violence on children and their families.


Safe start vision
Safe Start Vision

  • Create a comprehensive service delivery system that improves the access to, delivery of and quality of services for young children at high risk of exposure to violence or who have already been exposed to violence.

  • Identify children and families at any point of entry into the system.


Safe start definition of exposure to violence
Safe Start Definition of Exposure to Violence

Being a direct victim of abuse, neglect, or maltreatment or a witness to domestic violence or other violent crime in the community.


Guiding principles
Guiding Principles

  • Balanceinnovation of practice withefficacyof interventions

  • Increaseawarenessand identification of children exposed to violence

  • Plan for safety of adult victim AND child in all systems/entry points


Guiding principles1
Guiding Principles

  • Develop and support systems that provide developmentally appropriate, specialized, and evidence based interventions

  • Use anecologicalapproach—children’s risk and resiliency children in the context of family and community


National safe start initiative framework
National Safe Start Initiative Framework

Sphere of Influence and Support


Components
Components

  • Practice innovation

  • Research

  • Evaluation

  • Training and technical assistance

  • Information and resource development


Demonstration sites phase i
Demonstration Sites: Phase I

Practice Innovation Component

Baltimore, MD Pueblo of Zuni, NM

Bridgeport, CT* Rochester, NY*

Chatham County, NC San Francisco, CA*Chicago, IL* Sitka Tribe of Alaska

Pinellas County, FL* Spokane, WA*

Pueblo of Zuni, NM Washington Co., ME


Promising approaches sites phase ii
Promising Approaches Sites: Phase II

  • Chelsea, MA Toledo, OH

  • Dallas, TX San Mateo, CA

  • Dayton, OH San Diego, CA

  • Erie, PA Bronx, NY

  • Portland, OR Providence, RI

  • Oakland, CA Pompano, FL

  • Miami, FL New York City, NY

  • Kalamazoo, MI


Information resource development training and technical assistance
Information, Resource Development, Training and Technical Assistance

National Center on Children Exposed to Violence

Dr. James Lewis

www.nccev.org

1-877-49-NCCEV

The Safe Start Center

Elena Cohen

www.safestartcenter.org

1-800-865-0965


Association for the Study and Development of Community AssistanceDemonstration Sites Evaluation DesignCross-site Outcome Process Evaluation Case Studies 6 Local Child-Level Outcome Studies—”Tier II” StudiesRAND CorporationPilot Site Evaluation DesignQuasi-Experimental Comparison Study Process Evaluation Training Component Evaluation

Evaluation


Research
Research Assistance

University of New Hampshire

  • National Study on Children Exposed to Violence

    Randomized Telephone Survey on Incidence and Prevalence


Phase i demonstration sites strategies and practices
Phase I: Demonstration Sites AssistanceStrategies and Practices

  • Increased identification of children exposed to violence and capacity to document these children to get real estimates on the prevalence—dispatch and police reports, 211, and hotlines

  • Acute Response—Commitment to “Respond at least as fast as a tow truck”

  • Increased Awareness of both professionals and public—two nationally award-winning PSA’s

  • Increased service pathways and collaboration

  • Created multiple point of entry

  • Modified infrastructure of local service delivery systems by creating centralized access and by developing partnerships that expedited linkages

  • Changes in Policy and Procedures—MOUs, New Protocols for CPS/DV

  • Improved existing mental health services by funding specialized training


Phase i strategies and practices cont
Phase I—Strategies and Practices (Cont) Assistance

  • Ambassador Kits (volunteers trained to deliver key messages), Briefcases, “Flip” Books for getting the word out

  • Increased Community Capacity to Respond to CEV through Training and Cross-Training, incl. Training Matrix and “Incubator” Model


Phase i strategies and practices cont1
Phase I—Strategies and Practices (Cont) Assistance

  • Increased awareness of both professionals and public—two nationally award-winning PSA’s

  • Increased service pathways and collaboration

  • Changes in Policy and Procedures—MOUs, New Protocols for CPS/DV


Phase i strategies and practices cont2
Phase I Strategies and Practices (Cont) Assistance

  • Created multiple point of entry

  • Modified infrastructure of local service delivery systems by creating centralized access and by developing partnerships that expedited linkages


Phase i strategies and practices cont3
Phase I: Strategies and Practices (Cont) Assistance

  • Improved existing mental health services by funding specialized training

  • Increased sustainability by creating local funding streams through tax base and through strong coordinating bodies of governance


Phase i strategies and practices cont4
Phase I—Strategies and Practices (Cont) Assistance

  • Utilized data-based decision making

  • Developed screening procedures and protocols

  • DV Protocol for the Department of Children and Families

  • Coordinated Case Review

  • Home-based therapy and cell phone distribution


Phase i strategies and practices cont5
Phase I: Strategies and Practices (Cont) Assistance

  • Modification of police dispatch software to record presence of a child (for services support—not court witnesses)

  • Course Credits/Certifications/Funding of Training (for partner providers)

  • Coding 911 calls for child presence


Phase i strategies and practices cont6
Phase I—Strategies and Practices (Cont) Assistance

  • Buy-in from police for referrals through “tow truck” commitment

  • Dependency Court Judges to drive reform in the dependency system with increased awareness of CEV


Phase i demonstration sites accomplishments
Phase I: Demonstration Sites AssistanceAccomplishments

  • Evaluation Findings:

  • Development new working relationships between sectors

  • Developed comprehensive and coordinated systems of care

  • Institutionalized knowledge, skills and tools among allied providers

  • Demonstrated capacity to change policy for CEV

  • Demonstrated that with treatment, it is possible to reduce the impact of exposure to violence on children


Parent Child Interactive Therapy (PCIT) AssistanceChild Parent Psychotherapy (CPP-DV)Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)Trauma Assessment Pathway (TAP)

Phase II: Diversity of Approaches


Phase ii diversity of approaches cont
Phase II—Diversity of Approaches (Cont) Assistance

  • Home Visitation

  • Domestic Violence Shelter-Based Service

  • Motivational Interviewing

  • Kinship care /dyad therapy

  • Child Welfare-Domestic Violence Integrated Services

  • After School Support/Kids Club


Phase ii diversity of approaches
Phase II—Diversity of Approaches Assistance

  • In-Home Family Centered Services

  • Integrated Case Management (Mental Health/Social Services, Family Support)

  • Specialized Head Start Curriculum

  • Medical Home

  • Child Advocacy Centers


Safe Start National Evaluation Reports Assistance

National Evaluation Reports

Demonstration- Phase I

Promising Practices-Report II--Available

“Creating a Responsive System of Care for Children Exposed to Violence”-Process Evaluation Report--Available

Engaging and Retaining Families Exposed to Violence—Special Report – Available

Series of Outcome Studies and Validation of an Assessment Tool for Tier II sites- Fall 06

Special Issue Journal- Fall 20

www.capablecommunity.com


National Safe Start Assistance

Initiative Development

Other Activities/Partnerships

  • Training and Technical AssistanceConsultant Pool

    -Peer Support Model

    -Expert Support

    -Consultation/On-site/Cross-site

  • Speaker’s Bureau

  • Publications Series and Resources:

    2 Special Issue Journals, Fact Sheet, Journal Articles, Special Topic Reports, Briefs

    -Tools, Handbooks and TTA materials

    -Literature and Knowledge Development

    -Research and Evaluation Reports

    -Practice and Intervention

  • CEV Think Tankwith the Institute on Violence, Abuse and Trauma (IVAT) in San Diego—September 2006-- Special Issue Journal

  • CEV Panel Workshopat APA Convention in New Orleans, August 2006-Planning Meeting

  • Domestic Violence Awareness Month,October 2006, OJP focus on CEV for Web Forum

  • APA Policy Symposium (tentative),Winter 2007

  • World Child Abuse Prevention Day with release ofUN Study on CEV,APA, November 2006

  • Judicial Benchcardon CEV developed with OJJDP and NCJFCJ, Fall 2006


National safe start initiative development our partners
National Safe Start AssistanceInitiative Development Our Partners

RAND

Association for the Study and Development of Community

University of New Hampshire

National Center on Children Exposed to Violence at Yale

Safe Start Center

Zero to Three

Family Violence Prevention Fund

Institute for Community Peace

American Psychological Association

National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges

Early Trauma Treatment Network

California State Attorney General’s Office

Institute on Violence, Abuse and Trauma-Alliant University

Division 56: Trauma Division for APA

And all our ongoing Federal and Local Partners


Kristen Kracke, MSW Assistance

Safe Start Initiative Coordinator

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

U.S. Department of Justice

810 7th Street, NW

Washington, DC 20531

202-616-3649

Email: [email protected]


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