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Curriculum Engine






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Curriculum Engine VisionDemonstrationImplementation TimelineExploration Checklist. Agenda. Outcomes. Explain the vision of the curriculum engine.Access their curriculum.Use the Curriculum Engine to plan instruction.. from Flickr user t. magnum. Fast Curriculum AccessPowerful Collective KnowledgeEasy Collaborative Planning.
Curriculum Engine

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1. Teacher Professional Development Curriculum Engine [NOTES UPDATED 5/30/11] Training Length: 3 hours Slides 1-23: ~ 1 hour Slide 24 (Exploration Time): ~1-1.5 hours Slide 25-end: ~ 30 minutes Materials Required: Handout: Agenda/Exploration Checklist/First Steps Checklist Computers with Internet Access Training Notes: Although some information about the Common Core State Standards is included in this training, the main focus of the training is on the features and functionality of the Curriculum Engine Write presenter contact information on board Tech Notes: If you use Firefox (3.6+), Chrome, or Safari, the Curriculum Engine will always work faster and look better. To quickly switch between windows, use ?Alt? + ?Tab?. This is useful when switching between the Power Point and demonstrating the Curriculum Engine. If you are using a clicker, do not use the laser pointer during a demonstration because clicking on the laser pointer will refresh the web page.[NOTES UPDATED 5/30/11] Training Length: 3 hours Slides 1-23: ~ 1 hour Slide 24 (Exploration Time): ~1-1.5 hours Slide 25-end: ~ 30 minutes Materials Required: Handout: Agenda/Exploration Checklist/First Steps Checklist Computers with Internet Access Training Notes: Although some information about the Common Core State Standards is included in this training, the main focus of the training is on the features and functionality of the Curriculum Engine Write presenter contact information on board Tech Notes: If you use Firefox (3.6+), Chrome, or Safari, the Curriculum Engine will always work faster and look better. To quickly switch between windows, use ?Alt? + ?Tab?. This is useful when switching between the Power Point and demonstrating the Curriculum Engine. If you are using a clicker, do not use the laser pointer during a demonstration because clicking on the laser pointer will refresh the web page.

2. Curriculum Engine Vision Demonstration Implementation Timeline Exploration Checklist Agenda Today, we will share with you the vision of the Curriculum Engine and why it was created. Then we will do a quick demonstration of the Curriculum Engine so you can see what it looks like in action. We will then talk about the implementation timeline detailing when the Curriculum Engine will go live. Finally, the vast majority of time today will be spent with you exploring the Curriculum Engine using the Exploration Checklist. Before you begin working on the Exploration Checklist, I will take a few moments to explain a few Curriculum Engine concepts regarding how the lesson planning tools works. Today, we will share with you the vision of the Curriculum Engine and why it was created. Then we will do a quick demonstration of the Curriculum Engine so you can see what it looks like in action. We will then talk about the implementation timeline detailing when the Curriculum Engine will go live. Finally, the vast majority of time today will be spent with you exploring the Curriculum Engine using the Exploration Checklist. Before you begin working on the Exploration Checklist, I will take a few moments to explain a few Curriculum Engine concepts regarding how the lesson planning tools works.

3. Outcomes Explain the vision of the curriculum engine. Access their curriculum. Use the Curriculum Engine to plan instruction. By the end of this professional development session, you will be able to explain the vision of the Curriculum Engine, access the curriculum on the Curriculum Engine, and use the Curriculum Engine to plan instruction. By the end of this professional development session, you will be able to explain the vision of the Curriculum Engine, access the curriculum on the Curriculum Engine, and use the Curriculum Engine to plan instruction.

4. Currently, teachers in the Clark County School District plan classroom instruction by using several quality curriculum documents. For example, an elementary school teacher utilizes the Curriculum Essentials Framework and Nevada State Standards. In addition, they use the Power Standards, Guide for Benchmarks and this does not include resources a teacher may access at wiki-teacher.com or on the Regional Professional Development Program website. With the use of the Curriculum Engine, we will synthesize all of this information from these documents into one, easy-to-use location. Currently, teachers in the Clark County School District plan classroom instruction by using several quality curriculum documents. For example, an elementary school teacher utilizes the Curriculum Essentials Framework and Nevada State Standards. In addition, they use the Power Standards, Guide for Benchmarks and this does not include resources a teacher may access at wiki-teacher.com or on the Regional Professional Development Program website. With the use of the Curriculum Engine, we will synthesize all of this information from these documents into one, easy-to-use location.

5. In the Clark County School District we have over 18,000 educators, and, among us, we have an incredible amount of knowledge about teaching our curriculum with our students. Imagine if we could somehow harness this collective knowledge into an enormous filing cabinet. This is another one the goals for the Curriculum Engine. We are collecting all of our knowledge about the standards into one location. In the Clark County School District we have over 18,000 educators, and, among us, we have an incredible amount of knowledge about teaching our curriculum with our students. Imagine if we could somehow harness this collective knowledge into an enormous filing cabinet. This is another one the goals for the Curriculum Engine. We are collecting all of our knowledge about the standards into one location.

6. Fast Curriculum Access Powerful Collective Knowledge Easy Collaborative Planning Project Vision The Curriculum Engine is a web-based curriculum delivery system where we are striving to provide one-stop shopping for teachers. The Curriculum Engine will provide fast access to the curriculum so that teachers no longer have to keep track of different curriculum documents and which folders they are located on in InterAct. The Curriculum Engine will also provide a way for educators to store and access the district?s powerful collective knowledge. Finally, the Curriculum Engine will include a tool that allows teachers to plan with their colleagues in an easy and collaborative way. The Curriculum Engine is a web-based curriculum delivery system where we are striving to provide one-stop shopping for teachers. The Curriculum Engine will provide fast access to the curriculum so that teachers no longer have to keep track of different curriculum documents and which folders they are located on in InterAct. The Curriculum Engine will also provide a way for educators to store and access the district?s powerful collective knowledge. Finally, the Curriculum Engine will include a tool that allows teachers to plan with their colleagues in an easy and collaborative way.

7. Demonstration Note: The Math 6 course is the best to demonstrate because it is the most complete. Bulleted Outline: Login Point out left side is curriculum, right side is planning tool Open up Math 6 calendar view, flip through months Open up Math 6 list view, flip through options Open up math 6 document view, download a document Switch back to Math 6 calendar view, click on magnifying glass, open an unwrapped standard Open up sections of an unwrapped standard Switch back to Curriculum Engine Create a calendar layer Drag/drop standards and objectives on to calendar; equate to long-term planning Double-click on a calendar item to demonstrate adding lesson plans Double-click on a calendar layer to demonstrate changing the ?Viewing Access? and ?Editing Access? options Script: Let?s take a look at what the Curriculum Engine actually looks like. To access the Curriculum Engine, we open a web browser (Mozilla Firefox is best), go to curriculum.wiki-teacher.com (no www), log in with our InterAct username/password, and we are in. The Curriculum Engine is divided into two columns: the left column is where we access our curriculum information and the calendar in the right column is our collaborative planning tool. On the left side, teachers can access the curriculum by clicking on Select a Course, making their content area/course/view selection, and clicking Show. Teachers can view a course in Calendar View to see things in chronological order or a teacher can switch to List View to see things in numerical order. A final way we can view the curriculum is through the Document View. This is where we can access all of the documents related to the course (e.g., Bloom?s Taxonomy, Scope & Goals, Components of an Effective Lesson). This is how we are providing fast access to the curriculum. The second big goal of the Curriculum Engine is to provide access to our powerful collective knowledge. If I switch back to Calendar View and I click on the show details icon (magnifying glass) under a Standard, I can access the unwrapped version of the Standard. In an unwrapped standard, some of the information I can access includes the standard?s learning targets, student-friendly learning targets, vocabulary, big idea, and essential question. These various sections are how we hope to categorically store our district?s collective knowledge. It will always be evolving and changing as we continue to gather more resources. If we go back to the Curriculum Engine, we can see the third big idea of the Curriculum Engine: the collaborate planning tool. In the right-column, I have a calendar that I can add many layers to. For example, I can click Add a Layer, give my new calendar layer a title, and click Create. Once I have done this, I can start dragging and dropping my standards/objectives on to the calendar. In essence, what I am doing is creating my long-term plan. Once I have dropped some standards/objectives on the calendar, I can double-click on one to start entering my lesson plan. What makes this process collaborative, is the ability of a calendar owner to share their calendar with other teachers. If I double-click on the title of my calendar layer, I can change the viewing settings to school or public to share viewing rights of this calendar. I can also click Add an Editor to add other teachers as co-editors of the calendar so we can work together on the same calendar. Although this is a quick overview of the Curriculum Engine, this gives you a good idea of how the Curriculum Engine provides fast access to the curriculum, powerful collective knowledge, and a collaborative planning tool. Note: The Math 6 course is the best to demonstrate because it is the most complete. Bulleted Outline: Login Point out left side is curriculum, right side is planning tool Open up Math 6 calendar view, flip through months Open up Math 6 list view, flip through options Open up math 6 document view, download a document Switch back to Math 6 calendar view, click on magnifying glass, open an unwrapped standard Open up sections of an unwrapped standard Switch back to Curriculum Engine Create a calendar layer Drag/drop standards and objectives on to calendar; equate to long-term planning Double-click on a calendar item to demonstrate adding lesson plans Double-click on a calendar layer to demonstrate changing the ?Viewing Access? and ?Editing Access? options Script: Let?s take a look at what the Curriculum Engine actually looks like. To access the Curriculum Engine, we open a web browser (Mozilla Firefox is best), go to curriculum.wiki-teacher.com (no www), log in with our InterAct username/password, and we are in. The Curriculum Engine is divided into two columns: the left column is where we access our curriculum information and the calendar in the right column is our collaborative planning tool. On the left side, teachers can access the curriculum by clicking on Select a Course, making their content area/course/view selection, and clicking Show. Teachers can view a course in Calendar View to see things in chronological order or a teacher can switch to List View to see things in numerical order. A final way we can view the curriculum is through the Document View. This is where we can access all of the documents related to the course (e.g., Bloom?s Taxonomy, Scope & Goals, Components of an Effective Lesson). This is how we are providing fast access to the curriculum. The second big goal of the Curriculum Engine is to provide access to our powerful collective knowledge. If I switch back to Calendar View and I click on the show details icon (magnifying glass) under a Standard, I can access the unwrapped version of the Standard. In an unwrapped standard, some of the information I can access includes the standard?s learning targets, student-friendly learning targets, vocabulary, big idea, and essential question. These various sections are how we hope to categorically store our district?s collective knowledge. It will always be evolving and changing as we continue to gather more resources. If we go back to the Curriculum Engine, we can see the third big idea of the Curriculum Engine: the collaborate planning tool. In the right-column, I have a calendar that I can add many layers to. For example, I can click Add a Layer, give my new calendar layer a title, and click Create. Once I have done this, I can start dragging and dropping my standards/objectives on to the calendar. In essence, what I am doing is creating my long-term plan. Once I have dropped some standards/objectives on the calendar, I can double-click on one to start entering my lesson plan. What makes this process collaborative, is the ability of a calendar owner to share their calendar with other teachers. If I double-click on the title of my calendar layer, I can change the viewing settings to school or public to share viewing rights of this calendar. I can also click Add an Editor to add other teachers as co-editors of the calendar so we can work together on the same calendar. Although this is a quick overview of the Curriculum Engine, this gives you a good idea of how the Curriculum Engine provides fast access to the curriculum, powerful collective knowledge, and a collaborative planning tool.

8. Currently Available K-5 All Content Areas 6-8 English Language Arts & Mathematics Future Courses Implementation Plan [Notes Updated 5/30/11] I am proud to share that teachers have been piloting the Curriculum Engine since August 2010 with the inception of the sixth grade mathematics pilot program. Throughout the course of the school year, we have added sixth grade reading, sixth grade science, high school Pre-Algebra, and third grade to the pilot program. The teachers participating in the pilot program used the Curriculum Engine on a regular basis to access the curriculum and plan their classroom instruction. This pilot program was critical to us as we worked to refine the Curriculum Engine. As the pilot program teachers used the program and gave us feedback and ideas of how to improve, they have helped us ensure the Curriculum Engine is a great tool for teachers to use. I am excited to share that on Friday, June 3rd the Curriculum Engine went live for all elementary school teachers and all Mathematics and English Language Arts middle school teachers. On June 3rd, the curriculum for the 2011-2012 school year in these grades and content areas was released on the Curriculum Engine. This included the Common Core State Standards in alignment with the Nevada Transition Plan for the Common Core State Standards.[Notes Updated 5/30/11] I am proud to share that teachers have been piloting the Curriculum Engine since August 2010 with the inception of the sixth grade mathematics pilot program. Throughout the course of the school year, we have added sixth grade reading, sixth grade science, high school Pre-Algebra, and third grade to the pilot program. The teachers participating in the pilot program used the Curriculum Engine on a regular basis to access the curriculum and plan their classroom instruction. This pilot program was critical to us as we worked to refine the Curriculum Engine. As the pilot program teachers used the program and gave us feedback and ideas of how to improve, they have helped us ensure the Curriculum Engine is a great tool for teachers to use. I am excited to share that on Friday, June 3rd the Curriculum Engine went live for all elementary school teachers and all Mathematics and English Language Arts middle school teachers. On June 3rd, the curriculum for the 2011-2012 school year in these grades and content areas was released on the Curriculum Engine. This included the Common Core State Standards in alignment with the Nevada Transition Plan for the Common Core State Standards.

9. Curriculum Unwrapped Standards Calendar Exploration Checklist In a few moments we will be providing you with a hands-on opportunity to utilize the Curriculum Engine. You will be accessing the curriculum and unwrapped standards. In addition, you will be using the calendar to create layers and lesson plans. Let me provide you with some visual examples to represent some of the conceptual shifts that teachers will experience in planning their classroom instruction by using the Curriculum Engine.In a few moments we will be providing you with a hands-on opportunity to utilize the Curriculum Engine. You will be accessing the curriculum and unwrapped standards. In addition, you will be using the calendar to create layers and lesson plans. Let me provide you with some visual examples to represent some of the conceptual shifts that teachers will experience in planning their classroom instruction by using the Curriculum Engine.

10. Each course has multiple course views Pacing View (Mathematics & ELA only) List View Document View Curriculum Views [New Slide 5/30/11] When you are accessing curriculum, each course you access will have multiple views. Each of these views will give you different ways to see the same course. The pacing view provides a chronological view of the course where objectives/standards are grouped by trimester/quarter/half-quarter. The list view provides a view of the course where you can access all of the objectives/standards at once presented in numerical order. Finally, the document view is where you can download all of the documents/files related to the course like the Scope and Goals for the course, Bloom?s Taxonomy, Components of an Effective Lesson, etc?[New Slide 5/30/11] When you are accessing curriculum, each course you access will have multiple views. Each of these views will give you different ways to see the same course. The pacing view provides a chronological view of the course where objectives/standards are grouped by trimester/quarter/half-quarter. The list view provides a view of the course where you can access all of the objectives/standards at once presented in numerical order. Finally, the document view is where you can download all of the documents/files related to the course like the Scope and Goals for the course, Bloom?s Taxonomy, Components of an Effective Lesson, etc?

11. Curriculum Information [New Slide 5/30/11] When you are accessing mathematics and ELA curriculum in the Curriculum Engine, you will notice that there is a link to Curriculum Information in the first group of every pacing view (e.g., 1st Trimester/1st Quarter). We want to take a few moments and talk about this information whole group, but know that you will be able to refer back to this information at any time in the Curriculum Engine. [New Slide 5/30/11] When you are accessing mathematics and ELA curriculum in the Curriculum Engine, you will notice that there is a link to Curriculum Information in the first group of every pacing view (e.g., 1st Trimester/1st Quarter). We want to take a few moments and talk about this information whole group, but know that you will be able to refer back to this information at any time in the Curriculum Engine.

12. Pacing identifies instructional focus for a trimester/quarter/half-quarter Ongoing instruction throughout the school year Icons in K-5 mathematics & ELA and 6-8 ELA provide visual indication of pacing Pacing View [New Slide 5/30/11] One topic covered in the Curriculum Information help topics is the pacing view because it does represent a shift from ways we have organized the curriculum in the past. - Pacing View Notes From Online Help - The intent of the Common Core State Standards is mastery of grade-level content by the end of the school year. Therefore, the District is changing from the Guide for Benchmarks that indicated mastery of the Power Standards at the end of each quarter to the Pacing View on the Curriculum Engine which identifies the instructional focus during each trimester/quarter/half-quarter. Standards paced in a trimester/quarter/half-quarter will serve as the focus of instruction; however, there will be ongoing instruction (i.e. daily review, long-term review, and re-teaching) throughout the school year of all previously-taught grade-level standards. The order in which the standards appear in each quarter does not necessarily indicate the order in which they are to be taught within the quarter. Pacing Icon (K-5 mathematics, K-8 ELA only) The intent of the pacing icon is to provide assistance with the transition from the Guide for Benchmarks to Pacing View on the Curriculum Engine. The purpose of the shaded section is to indicate the trimester/quarter of instructional focus. The dots in the remaining trimesters/quarters indicate that instruction of the standard is ongoing (i.e. daily review, long-term review, and re-teaching) throughout the school year. Icons with all three/four sections shaded indicate standards that require continual instructional focus. [New Slide 5/30/11] One topic covered in the Curriculum Information help topics is the pacing view because it does represent a shift from ways we have organized the curriculum in the past. - Pacing View Notes From Online Help - The intent of the Common Core State Standards is mastery of grade-level content by the end of the school year. Therefore, the District is changing from the Guide for Benchmarks that indicated mastery of the Power Standards at the end of each quarter to the Pacing View on the Curriculum Engine which identifies the instructional focus during each trimester/quarter/half-quarter. Standards paced in a trimester/quarter/half-quarter will serve as the focus of instruction; however, there will be ongoing instruction (i.e. daily review, long-term review, and re-teaching) throughout the school year of all previously-taught grade-level standards. The order in which the standards appear in each quarter does not necessarily indicate the order in which they are to be taught within the quarter. Pacing Icon (K-5 mathematics, K-8 ELA only) The intent of the pacing icon is to provide assistance with the transition from the Guide for Benchmarks to Pacing View on the Curriculum Engine. The purpose of the shaded section is to indicate the trimester/quarter of instructional focus. The dots in the remaining trimesters/quarters indicate that instruction of the standard is ongoing (i.e. daily review, long-term review, and re-teaching) throughout the school year. Icons with all three/four sections shaded indicate standards that require continual instructional focus.

13. Some Common Core State Standards separated for assessment/pacing purposes (e.g., 3.OA.3 was separated into 3.OA.3-1 and 3.OA.3-2) Mathematics Curriculum Notes [New Slide 5/30/11] In addition to information on Pacing View, there is information about both the mathematics and ELA curriculum. - Mathematics Curriculum Notes From Online Help - For the purposes of assessment and pacing of the standards, some of the Common Core State Standards were separated to clearly identify a unique concept or skill. For example, standard 3.OA.3 was separated into 3.OA.3-1 and 3.OA.3-2 to clearly identify the use of multiplication and division.[New Slide 5/30/11] In addition to information on Pacing View, there is information about both the mathematics and ELA curriculum. - Mathematics Curriculum Notes From Online Help - For the purposes of assessment and pacing of the standards, some of the Common Core State Standards were separated to clearly identify a unique concept or skill. For example, standard 3.OA.3 was separated into 3.OA.3-1 and 3.OA.3-2 to clearly identify the use of multiplication and division.

14. Nevada State Assessed Indicators appear next to the most closely connected Common Core State Standards ELA Curriculum Notes [New Slide 5/30/11] - ELA Curriculum Notes From Online Help - During the transition from the Nevada State English Language Arts Standards to the Common Core State Standards, it is necessary to identify the Nevada State Assessed Indicators which remain tested items for the Spring 2012 Criterion-Referenced Tests. The Pacing View on the Curriculum Engine helps teachers plan the pacing of instruction to ensure that all Nevada State Assessed Indicators are taught prior to the administration of the Spring 2012 Criterion-Referenced Tests. The Nevada State Assessed Indicators have been paced under the most closely connected Common Core State Standard(s).[New Slide 5/30/11] - ELA Curriculum Notes From Online Help - During the transition from the Nevada State English Language Arts Standards to the Common Core State Standards, it is necessary to identify the Nevada State Assessed Indicators which remain tested items for the Spring 2012 Criterion-Referenced Tests. The Pacing View on the Curriculum Engine helps teachers plan the pacing of instruction to ensure that all Nevada State Assessed Indicators are taught prior to the administration of the Spring 2012 Criterion-Referenced Tests. The Nevada State Assessed Indicators have been paced under the most closely connected Common Core State Standard(s).

15. Calendar Layers Elementary Example All of the planning information on the Curriculum Engine is arranged into Calendar Layers. Calendar layers are like virtual transparency sheets that store all of your calendar items/lesson plans. By storing this information in separate layers, you can color code calendar items for each course/content area and you can turn these layers on and off. One of the important first steps in using the Curriculum Engine is setting up the calendar layers in a way that makes sense for you. For example, many elementary school teachers keep their lesson plans in a grid with days on one axis, and the content areas/parts of the day on the other. In the example shown on the screen, <<CLICK>> we would have separate calendar layers for each part of the day. A math layer, a writing layer, a reading whole group layer, a reading small group layer, etc?. All of the planning information on the Curriculum Engine is arranged into Calendar Layers. Calendar layers are like virtual transparency sheets that store all of your calendar items/lesson plans. By storing this information in separate layers, you can color code calendar items for each course/content area and you can turn these layers on and off. One of the important first steps in using the Curriculum Engine is setting up the calendar layers in a way that makes sense for you. For example, many elementary school teachers keep their lesson plans in a grid with days on one axis, and the content areas/parts of the day on the other. In the example shown on the screen, <<CLICK>> we would have separate calendar layers for each part of the day. A math layer, a writing layer, a reading whole group layer, a reading small group layer, etc?.

16. Calendar Layers Secondary Example Let?s look at this same concept in a secondary setting. If a teacher taught both Math 6 and Math 6 Accelerated, that teacher would likely set up one layer for Math 6 and a second layer for Math 6 Accelerated. These ?layers? are where all of the calendar items/lesson plans are stored. By keeping lesson plans stored on separate layers, we can quickly turn their visibility on and off or print lesson plans out by day or by layer. It also allows us to share one content area?s lesson plans, but not another?s.Let?s look at this same concept in a secondary setting. If a teacher taught both Math 6 and Math 6 Accelerated, that teacher would likely set up one layer for Math 6 and a second layer for Math 6 Accelerated. These ?layers? are where all of the calendar items/lesson plans are stored. By keeping lesson plans stored on separate layers, we can quickly turn their visibility on and off or print lesson plans out by day or by layer. It also allows us to share one content area?s lesson plans, but not another?s.

17. Calendar Layers Lesson Plan Template Elementary Example Another important conceptual shift is understanding how the lesson plan templates work in the Curriculum Engine and setting up all of your lesson plan templates. When creating lesson plans, most teachers have a ?template? that they start with that includes elements such as the lesson objective(s), procedures, materials, assessment, grouping, etc. As you drag and drop things on to the Curriculum Engine, it would be very time consuming to retype this ?template? each time you created a new lesson. To make this easier, you can set up a lesson plan template for each calendar layer. The Curriculum Engine will then use whatever text you have set up as the lesson plan template and copy/paste that into all of the new calendar items you create on that layer. One way to think about it is the template for each layer is what is found <CLICK> in each cell of your lesson plan grid. For example, you might want the system to start each new calendar item with ?Objective:? Materials:? Procedures:? Assessment:? etc.? But, because we are doing a separate template for each layer, you can actually have separate templates for each layer to save yourself even more time. For example, perhaps for your math layer you want the template to say ?Materials: enVisionMath pp.? but in your reading layer you want the template to say ?Materials: Trohpies pp.?. Another important conceptual shift is understanding how the lesson plan templates work in the Curriculum Engine and setting up all of your lesson plan templates. When creating lesson plans, most teachers have a ?template? that they start with that includes elements such as the lesson objective(s), procedures, materials, assessment, grouping, etc. As you drag and drop things on to the Curriculum Engine, it would be very time consuming to retype this ?template? each time you created a new lesson. To make this easier, you can set up a lesson plan template for each calendar layer. The Curriculum Engine will then use whatever text you have set up as the lesson plan template and copy/paste that into all of the new calendar items you create on that layer. One way to think about it is the template for each layer is what is found <CLICK> in each cell of your lesson plan grid. For example, you might want the system to start each new calendar item with ?Objective:? Materials:? Procedures:? Assessment:? etc.? But, because we are doing a separate template for each layer, you can actually have separate templates for each layer to save yourself even more time. For example, perhaps for your math layer you want the template to say ?Materials: enVisionMath pp.? but in your reading layer you want the template to say ?Materials: Trohpies pp.?.

18. Calendar Layers Lesson Plan Template Secondary Example The lesson plan template concept works identically in MS. In the lesson plan template for each layer, you put what you would normally put in each cell <CLICK> of your lesson plan template.The lesson plan template concept works identically in MS. In the lesson plan template for each layer, you put what you would normally put in each cell <CLICK> of your lesson plan template.

19. Calendar Layers Demonstration * Note: It does not matter what content area/grade you use to demonstrate these concepts Bulleted List: Switch back to the Curriculum Engine If not already done, create additional layers to demonstrate having different layers for different content areas/courses Open up first calendar layer, and quickly create a dummy template Drag multiple objectives/standards to the layer and open them up to demonstrate how they were pre-populated with the template Script: Let?s see how these calendar layers work in the Curriculum Engine. <Switch to Curriculum Engine.> I am going to add a few additional layers similar to what we saw in the example. <Add additional examples appropriate to your audience based on previous slides.> Now that I have my layers set up for my different content areas/courses, I can double-click on one of my calendar layers and start editing my template. Remember, whatever I put in as my template for this layer will be automatically copied/pasted into any new standards/objectives I place on this layer. So, for this layer I could determine that my template is going to include <Type>?Objective:, Procedures:, Materials:, Grouping:, and Assessment:?</Type> so that is what I put in as this layer?s template. I might even be more specific and I might change ?Objective:? to ?Objective: SWBAT? because I always start my objectives with SWBAT. Or, I could change ?Materials:? to ?Materials: enVisionMath? because enVisionMath is my adopted program and my primary source of lesson materials. Once I am done, I am going to Save my calendar layer. Now, as I drag new standards/objectives to the calendar, you can see that the system automatically copied and pasted the template into these calendar items.* Note: It does not matter what content area/grade you use to demonstrate these concepts Bulleted List: Switch back to the Curriculum Engine If not already done, create additional layers to demonstrate having different layers for different content areas/courses Open up first calendar layer, and quickly create a dummy template Drag multiple objectives/standards to the layer and open them up to demonstrate how they were pre-populated with the template Script: Let?s see how these calendar layers work in the Curriculum Engine. <Switch to Curriculum Engine.> I am going to add a few additional layers similar to what we saw in the example. <Add additional examples appropriate to your audience based on previous slides.> Now that I have my layers set up for my different content areas/courses, I can double-click on one of my calendar layers and start editing my template. Remember, whatever I put in as my template for this layer will be automatically copied/pasted into any new standards/objectives I place on this layer. So, for this layer I could determine that my template is going to include <Type>?Objective:, Procedures:, Materials:, Grouping:, and Assessment:?</Type> so that is what I put in as this layer?s template. I might even be more specific and I might change ?Objective:? to ?Objective: SWBAT? because I always start my objectives with SWBAT. Or, I could change ?Materials:? to ?Materials: enVisionMath? because enVisionMath is my adopted program and my primary source of lesson materials. Once I am done, I am going to Save my calendar layer. Now, as I drag new standards/objectives to the calendar, you can see that the system automatically copied and pasted the template into these calendar items.

20. Calendar Layers Viewing and Editing Permissions One of the key advantages to doing your lesson plans online in the Curriculum Engine is the simplicity of sharing them with other teachers. For each calendar layer, you can determine who can view the layer and who else can edit the layer. The three viewing access options are: Private?- the calendar layer can be viewed by the owner and site administrators School?- the calendar layer can be subscribed to by any other teacher with the same location code Public?- the calendar layer can be subscribed to by any teacher in the district Note: All site administrators (and anyone they designate like a literacy specialist or office manager) can view any of a teacher?s lesson plans, even if a layer is set to private. It is also possible to add other users as co-editors. One common misconception is that you are editing separate copies of the calendar. What you are actually doing is editing the same exact layer. An example of sharing calendar layers includes a general education and special education co-teaching teams who are editing the same calendar layer. Another example is a grade level that has a common math lesson planning calendar layer that they are all co-editors. Another example is a grade level that has one common pacing calendar layer, but then each person has their own layer for their individual lesson plans.One of the key advantages to doing your lesson plans online in the Curriculum Engine is the simplicity of sharing them with other teachers. For each calendar layer, you can determine who can view the layer and who else can edit the layer. The three viewing access options are: Private?- the calendar layer can be viewed by the owner and site administrators School?- the calendar layer can be subscribed to by any other teacher with the same location code Public?- the calendar layer can be subscribed to by any teacher in the district Note: All site administrators (and anyone they designate like a literacy specialist or office manager) can view any of a teacher?s lesson plans, even if a layer is set to private. It is also possible to add other users as co-editors. One common misconception is that you are editing separate copies of the calendar. What you are actually doing is editing the same exact layer. An example of sharing calendar layers includes a general education and special education co-teaching teams who are editing the same calendar layer. Another example is a grade level that has a common math lesson planning calendar layer that they are all co-editors. Another example is a grade level that has one common pacing calendar layer, but then each person has their own layer for their individual lesson plans.

21. Calendar Layers Permissions Demonstration As I switch back to the Curriculum Engine, I can double-click on a calendar layer to view its details. It is here that I can change both the Viewing Access and Editing Access for the layer. For instance, if I wanted other teachers in my grade level to be able to subscribe to/view this layer, I would change the Viewing Access to School. If, however, I want them to be able to edit the calendar layer, I click on the Add an Editor button, find the other user by name (full or partial searches are ok), click Find, and then click Add next to the desired user?s name. Now, the next time that user reloads their page, they will be able to see and edit that calendar layer. As I switch back to the Curriculum Engine, I can double-click on a calendar layer to view its details. It is here that I can change both the Viewing Access and Editing Access for the layer. For instance, if I wanted other teachers in my grade level to be able to subscribe to/view this layer, I would change the Viewing Access to School. If, however, I want them to be able to edit the calendar layer, I click on the Add an Editor button, find the other user by name (full or partial searches are ok), click Find, and then click Add next to the desired user?s name. Now, the next time that user reloads their page, they will be able to see and edit that calendar layer.

22. Make print-outs of each week?s lesson plans. Features will be added on a rolling basis. Miscellaneous Notes There are two final details I want to share before we start the Exploration Checklist. First, you should continue to print out each week?s lesson plans. The Curriculum Engine is a computer system and it is fallible, so it is important to have a backup in these instances (e.g., power loss, loss of Internet connectivity). This is one of the steps in the Exploration Checklist and it is very easy to print out a week?s lesson plans in the Curriculum Engine. Also, we are always striving to improve the Curriculum Engine which means that from time to time features will be changed/added on the Curriculum Engine. Accordingly, if you have a suggestion for how to improve the Curriculum Engine please either e-mail them to Justin White or use the Contact Us link at the bottom of the Curriculum Engine page.There are two final details I want to share before we start the Exploration Checklist. First, you should continue to print out each week?s lesson plans. The Curriculum Engine is a computer system and it is fallible, so it is important to have a backup in these instances (e.g., power loss, loss of Internet connectivity). This is one of the steps in the Exploration Checklist and it is very easy to print out a week?s lesson plans in the Curriculum Engine. Also, we are always striving to improve the Curriculum Engine which means that from time to time features will be changed/added on the Curriculum Engine. Accordingly, if you have a suggestion for how to improve the Curriculum Engine please either e-mail them to Justin White or use the Contact Us link at the bottom of the Curriculum Engine page.

23. Online Help Although there are many more details I could demonstrate for you whole group, we know that it is very important that you get the experience of learning how to use the Curriculum Engine for yourself. In a moment, as you start going through the Exploration Checklist, you will likely encounter a few steps that you can?t figure out just by looking at the button on the page. In these cases you can use the included help topics to guide you through these steps. Next to each Exploration Checklist step, there is a number in italics that corresponds to the appropriate help topic. For instance, if you get to the curriculum step that says ?Set a curriculum Quick Link? (6th step) and you need help, the italicized number points you to help topic #3. So, just click on the Help button at the top of the page and then click on help topic #3 in curriculum. The help topic will include step-by-step directions and some even include quick video screencasts. I will also be here to help, so please feel free to ask me, BUT, I won?t be at your school/classroom when you get stuck and these help topics will be, so be sure to lean on them today so you are familiar with using them in the future.Although there are many more details I could demonstrate for you whole group, we know that it is very important that you get the experience of learning how to use the Curriculum Engine for yourself. In a moment, as you start going through the Exploration Checklist, you will likely encounter a few steps that you can?t figure out just by looking at the button on the page. In these cases you can use the included help topics to guide you through these steps. Next to each Exploration Checklist step, there is a number in italics that corresponds to the appropriate help topic. For instance, if you get to the curriculum step that says ?Set a curriculum Quick Link? (6th step) and you need help, the italicized number points you to help topic #3. So, just click on the Help button at the top of the page and then click on help topic #3 in curriculum. The help topic will include step-by-step directions and some even include quick video screencasts. I will also be here to help, so please feel free to ask me, BUT, I won?t be at your school/classroom when you get stuck and these help topics will be, so be sure to lean on them today so you are familiar with using them in the future.

24. Exploration Checklist [NOTES UPDATED 5/30/11] At this time, please open up Firefox if your computer has it (it will work faster and look better in Firefox), go to http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com (no www), log in, and start completing the checklist. Once you have completed the checklist, start working on the First Steps checklist on the back. --------- NOTES ------------- Completing the Exploration Checklist will likely take between 1.0 and 1.5 hrs. depending on the group. Keep track of common questions/key misconceptions that you notice during the training. These will be used during the Exploration Debrief. It is very important that you read your audience. As you see the first 2-3 participants finish the checklist, remind them that they can start on the First Steps list [NOTES UPDATED 5/30/11] At this time, please open up Firefox if your computer has it (it will work faster and look better in Firefox), go to http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com (no www), log in, and start completing the checklist. Once you have completed the checklist, start working on the First Steps checklist on the back. --------- NOTES ------------- Completing the Exploration Checklist will likely take between 1.0 and 1.5 hrs. depending on the group. Keep track of common questions/key misconceptions that you notice during the training. These will be used during the Exploration Debrief. It is very important that you read your audience. As you see the first 2-3 participants finish the checklist, remind them that they can start on the First Steps list

25. Exploration Debrief [New Slide 5/30/11] Review whole-group questions/misconceptions that participants had by demonstrating them live on the Curriculum Engine. Some common questions/misconceptions include: (see answers in FAQ document) Where do I put my opening procedures/specials/lunch/etc?? What is the ?district? requiring us to use on the Curriculum Engine? How do I delete my Quick Links? When I drag a standard/objective to the calendar, why isn?t it the color I thought it would be? Can I copy and paste my lesson plans/lesson plan template from Microsoft Word? Can I add attachments to my lesson plans? Does the Curriculum Engine have spellcheck built in? [New Slide 5/30/11] Review whole-group questions/misconceptions that participants had by demonstrating them live on the Curriculum Engine. Some common questions/misconceptions include: (see answers in FAQ document) Where do I put my opening procedures/specials/lunch/etc?? What is the ?district? requiring us to use on the Curriculum Engine? How do I delete my Quick Links? When I drag a standard/objective to the calendar, why isn?t it the color I thought it would be? Can I copy and paste my lesson plans/lesson plan template from Microsoft Word? Can I add attachments to my lesson plans? Does the Curriculum Engine have spellcheck built in?

26. For questions about the Curriculum Engine, please contact: Dr. Brenda Larsen-Mitchell Barry Bosacker Justin White 855-9768 Contact Information If you have further questions, ideas, or concerns about the Curriculum Engine, please feel free to contact Dr. Brenda Larsen-Mitchell or Justin White in the Curriculum and Professional Development Division by e-mail or phone.If you have further questions, ideas, or concerns about the Curriculum Engine, please feel free to contact Dr. Brenda Larsen-Mitchell or Justin White in the Curriculum and Professional Development Division by e-mail or phone.

27. Ultimately, we believe the Curriculum Engine is a tool to promote student achievement. The Curriculum Engine will provide services and resources to teachers in the classroom to foster an environment that supports all students being ready by exit. Thank you. Ultimately, we believe the Curriculum Engine is a tool to promote student achievement. The Curriculum Engine will provide services and resources to teachers in the classroom to foster an environment that supports all students being ready by exit. Thank you.


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