Six types of family school community partnerships volunteering type 3
Download
1 / 10

Six Types of Family/School/Community Partnerships Volunteering Type 3 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 115 Views
  • Uploaded on

Six Types of Family/School/Community Partnerships Volunteering Type 3. Based on the work of Joyce Epstein, Johns Hopkins University Baltimore Maryland PowerPoint presentation by Parents Plus Inc. Six Types of Family/School/Community Partnerships. Challenge and redefinition of “volunteers”.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Six Types of Family/School/Community Partnerships Volunteering Type 3' - carly-booker


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Six types of family school community partnerships volunteering type 3

Six Types of Family/School/Community PartnershipsVolunteering Type 3

Based on the work of Joyce Epstein,

Johns Hopkins University Baltimore Maryland

PowerPoint presentation by Parents Plus Inc.


Six types of family school community partnerships

Six Types of Family/School/Community Partnerships

Challenge and redefinition of “volunteers”


Type 3 volunteering
Type 3: Volunteering

  • Organize volunteers and audiences to support the school and students.


Annual survey to identify interests, talents, and availability of volunteers.

Parent room or family center for volunteer work, meetings and resources for families

Sample Practices Type 3


Sample practices type 3

Annual review of schedules for students’ performances, games, and assemblies for daytime and evening audiences.

Class parent, telephone tree, or other structures to provide all families with needed information.

Parent patrols to increase school safety.

Sample Practices Type 3


Challenges type 3
Challenges games, and assemblies for daytime and evening audiences.Type 3

  • Recruit widely for volunteers so that all families know that their time and talents are welcome.


Challenges type 31
Challenges games, and assemblies for daytime and evening audiences.Type 3

  • Make flexible schedules for volunteers, assemblies, and events to enable working parents to participate.


Challenges type 32
Challenges games, and assemblies for daytime and evening audiences.Type 3

  • Provide training for volunteers, and match time and talent with school needs


Redefine volunteers type 3
Redefine “volunteers” games, and assemblies for daytime and evening audiences.Type 3

  • “Volunteer” not only means those who come to school during the day, but also those who support school goals and children’s learning in any way, at any place, and at any time.


  • Results for Teachers: games, and assemblies for daytime and evening audiences.

  • Organization, training, and use of volunteers

  • Readiness to involve families in new ways, including those who do not volunteer at school.

  • Awareness of parents’ talents and interests in school and children.

  • Individual attention to students because of help from volunteers.

  • Results for Students:

  • Skills with communicating with adults.

  • Skills that are tutored or taught by volunteers

  • Awareness of many skills, talents, occupations, and contributions of other volunteers.

  • Results for Parents:

  • Understanding the teacher’s job

  • Self-confidence about work in school and with children.

  • Specific skills of volunteer work.

  • Use of school activities at home.

  • Enrollment in programs to improve own education

  • Organization, training, and use of volunteers

  • Readiness to involve families in new ways, including those who do not volunteer at school.

  • Awareness of parents’ talents and interests in school and children.

  • Individual attention to students because of help from volunteers.

  • Skills with communicating with adults.

  • Skills that are tutored or taught by volunteers

  • Awareness of many skills, talents, occupations, and contributions of other volunteers.

  • Results for Parents:Understanding the teacher’s job

  • Self-confidence about work in school and with children.

  • Specific skills of volunteer work.

  • Use of school activities at home.

  • Enrollment in programs to improve own education


ad