3 rd international conference on roundabouts
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Paper #IRC-0034 May 18, 2011. ROUNDABOUT OPPOSITION AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT. Exploring Trends in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont. 3 rd International Conference on Roundabouts.

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3 rd international conference on roundabouts

Paper #IRC-0034May 18, 2011

ROUNDABOUT OPPOSITION AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Exploring Trends in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont

3rd International Conference on Roundabouts

NATHAN P. BELZ, M.S., E.I. University of Vermont, Transportation Research CenterBurlington, VT 05405-1757Phone: (802) 656-5539Email:[email protected]

LISA AULTMAN-HALL, Ph.D.University of Vermont, Transportation Research CenterBurlington, VT 05405-1757Phone: (802) 656-1312Email: [email protected]


Background

BACKGROUND

Roundabouts have many benefits over conventional intersections, yet public and political challenges to implementation still exist in the United States

?


Background1

BACKGROUND

  • Negative experiences with traffic circles

Stigma surrounding roundabouts

Inability to discern between traffic circles, rotaries and roundabouts

Lack of exposure

OPPOSITION

Hesitance towards change

Loss of a familiar landscape


Background2

BACKGROUND

  • How do we deal with the issue of public acceptance?(Elephant in the room… )

  • Need a better understanding of

    • Factors contributing opposition

    • Community types


Background3

BACKGROUND

  • Behaviors and attitudes of individuals within a local area have a strong influence on the types of changes that occur within their neighborhoods.

  • There exists a relationship between design and behavior which will dictate the future environment of that neighborhood.

  • Neighborhood DesignResidents’ Behavior

  • Large body of research on how urban form affects transportation use.


Background4

BACKGROUND

  • A LOT of questions:

  • Why do some things take off and others do not? (social construction component)

  • Why are some states building numerous roundabouts and not others?

  • Why do some communities embrace the conversion of standard intersections to roundabouts and others do not?

Transportation System

Neighborhood Characteristics

Time

Space

Differential Success


Objectives

OBJECTIVES

Explore spatial relationships between rejected roundabouts and the following factors:

TRANSPORTATION

BUILT ENVIRONMENT

DEMOGRAPHICS

PUBLIC ATTITUDE AND BEHAVIOR


Reasearch questions

REASEARCH QUESTIONS

  • Research Questions:

  • Which variables affect the probability of roundabout rejection

  • What role do certain attitudes and landscape patterns play in roundabout rejections

  • A better understanding of the types of communities where roundabouts have been well received is essential in order to

  • Better allocate resources and efforts for public education and outreach

  • Select new sites for roundabouts that are likely to have minimal opposition


3 rd international conference on roundabouts

DATA

  • DATA

    • Built environment and transportation variables

      • National Land Cover Database (NLCD)

      • Nielson Database of Business Locations

      • Road Link Network

        • AADT

        • Intersection Density

        • Average Block Length

    • Demographic variables

      • US Census Bureau Block Group Data

        • Population Density (SF1)

        • Housing Density (SF1)

        • Income (SF3)

        • Education (SF3)

        • Age (SF1)


3 rd international conference on roundabouts

DATA

  • DATA (cont.)

    • Public attitudes, perceptions and behavioral variables

      • New England Transportation Institute Survey

        • Importance of a walkable neighborhood

        • Feel that their own neighborhood is walkable

        • Own emissions contribute to climate change

        • Feel biking is dangerous

        • Self-reported residential location

    • Roundabout/traffic circle location and attributes


Methods

METHODS

BURLINGTON

AUGUSTA

MONTPELIER

CONCORD

MANCHESTER


Methods1

METHODS

BURLINGTON

MONTPELIER

AUGUSTA

CONCORD

  • New England Transportation Survey Points

  • (N= 3557)

  • Business Points

  • (N=187216)


Methods2

METHODS

  • GIS generation of spatial variables for regression model

  • Roundabouts

  • Transportation

  • Attitudes and Perceptions

  • Land Use

  • Demographics


Methods3

METHODS

  • By Point:

  • Attitudes

  • Demographics

  • By Service Area:

  • Transportation

  • Land use


Methods4

15

METHODS

Kriging NETS data

  • Walkability Attitude

  • Emissions Attitude

  • Biking Attitude


Methods5

16

METHODS

Kriging NETS data

  • Area Type

  • Moran’s I = 0.637


3 rd international conference on roundabouts

DATA

TABLE 1 General roundabout variables


3 rd international conference on roundabouts

DATA

TABLE 2 Transportation and built environment variables


3 rd international conference on roundabouts

DATA

TABLE 3 Demographic variables


3 rd international conference on roundabouts

DATA

TABLE 4 Transportation and built environment variables


Results

21

RESULTS

N(exist) = 42, N(rej) = 28* Indicates significant correlation


Results1

22

RESULTS

MODEL1

-2 Log Likelihood = 39.667


Results2

23

RESULTS

MODEL2

-2 Log Likelihood = 43.291


Conclusions

24

CONCLUSIONS

  • Small changes in attitude result in large changes in likelihood of roundabout rejection

Lower intersection density and rural areas are more likely to be opposed to roundabouts

  • Higher business densities indicate acceptance of roundabout is more likely

ATTITUDES

(a. b. c.)

CHANGE

  • areas where biking is felt to be (more) dangerous

  • areas more aware of emissions contributions

  • areas that are perceived to be more walkable


Future and continuing work

25

FUTURE and CONTINUING WORK


Acknowledgements

26

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Collaboration with: Dr. Brian LeeAssistant Professor, UVM SoE

James Sullivan, P.E.Research Engineer, UVM TRC

Data and Information from: Vermont Agency of TransportationMaine Department of TransportationNew Hampshire Department of TransportationNew England Transportation Institute

Several RPCs and MPOs


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