A Promise of Freedom
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A Promise of Freedom. Chapter 17 section 3. Read:Setting the Scene pg. 496 Lincoln’s Goal Pg. 496-497 Take notes while reading Your choice: outline, 2-column, annotate w/sticky notes, or bulleted notes

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A Promise of Freedom

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A promise of freedom

A Promise of Freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

Read:Setting the Scene pg. 496

Lincoln’s Goal Pg. 496-497

Take notes while reading

Your choice: outline, 2-column,

annotate w/sticky notes, or

bulleted notes

When finished… STOP and

STAND at your desk


A promise of freedom

A Promise of Freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

Pg.496

Setting the Scene

“I makes up my mind to go and I leaves with a chunk of meat and cornbread … half skeert to death. I sure have my eyes open and my ears forward, watchin’ for the [Confederate slave patrols]. I step off the road in the night, at the sight of anything, and in the day I take to the woods.”

Some slaves ran away to join the war when

they heard that Northern soldiers were nearby.


A promise of freedom

Lincoln’s Goal

Chapter 17

section 3

“If I could save the Union

without freeing any slave,

I would do it; and if I

could save it by freeing all

the slaves, I would do it;

and if I could do it by

freeing some and leaving

others alone, I would also

do that.”

Ending slavery in the United States was NOT

President Lincoln’s goal at the beginning of the Civil War.

(But of course we do know that Lincoln thought that slavery was morally wrong)


A promise of freedom

A Promise of Freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

Read: The Emancipation Proclamation pg. 497

Motives and Timing pg.497

Impact of the Proclamation pgs.497-498

Take notes while reading

Your choice: outline, 2-column,

annotate w/sticky notes, or

bulleted notes

When finished… STOP and

STAND at your desk


A promise of freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

The Emancipation Proclamation

“On the 1st day of January, in

the year of our Lord 1863, all

persons held as slaves within

any state or … part of a state

[whose] people shall then be

in rebellion against the

United States, shall be then,

thenceforward, and forever

free.”

Lincoln tried to make things more difficult for the South by freeing the slaves in Confederate states hoping they would stop working for the Confederacy.


A promise of freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

The Emancipation Proclamation

The Emancipation Proclamation DID

- free slaves in Southern states that were

not captured by the Union.

- introduce the idea of emancipation to the

country slowly.

- add the goal of ending slavery in the South to the war.

The Emancipation Proclamation DID NOT

- free any slaves still in the Union.

- free slaves in Southern cities already

captured by the Union (New Orleans, parts of

Tennessee, parts of Virginia, etc.)

- really immediately free any slaves in the

Confederacy.


A promise of freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

The Emancipation Proclamation

Lincoln visited the troops after

the victory at Antietam, Maryland


A promise of freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

The Emancipation Proclamation

Lincoln visited the troops after

the victory at Antietam, Maryland


A promise of freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

The Emancipation Proclamation

Lincoln visited the troops after

the victory at Antietam, Maryland


A promise of freedom

The Emancipation Proclamation

Impact of the Proclamation

Chapter 17

section 3

The North

Abolitionists and free African-Americans in the North were very happy about the Proclamation.

The South

Slave owners in the South felt Lincoln was trying to rob them of their valuable property which they paid lots of money for.

Europe

Many Europeans felt sympathy for the situation of the enslaved Africans, especially factory workers who worked long hours for low pay because they knew how hard it was.

Fredrick

Douglas


A promise of freedom

A Promise of Freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

Read: African American Contributions pg. 496

In the Union Army pgs. 498-499

Acts of Bravery pg.499

Behind Confederate Lines pg.499

Take notes while reading

Your choice: outline, 2-column,

annotate w/sticky notes, or

bulleted notes

When finished… STOP and

STAND at your desk


A promise of freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

African American Contributions

In the Union Army

At the beginning of the war, thousands of free blacks wanted to sign up to fight in the war, but were not allowed, because they were not considered citizens.

In 1862, Congress repealed the law preventing blacks from joining the army and many free blacks and escaped slaves signed up to fight.

However, at first, blacks that enlisted were put only into all-black units and only allowed to support the war doing non-combat things like building roads, digging ditches and trenches, and guarding supplies.

By 1863, black soldiers were fighting on the battlefield and in 1864, they were finally given the same pay as white soldiers.


A promise of freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

African American Contributions

Acts of Bravery

The 54th Regiment


A promise of freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

African American Contributions

The Battle of Fort Wagner (South Carolina)


A promise of freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

African American Contributions

The Battle of Fort Wagner (South Carolina)


A promise of freedom

Chapter 17

section 3

African American Contributions

Acts of Bravery

The 54th Regiment (all black units) fought at the Battle of Fort Wagner. Even though the Union lost the battle, the 54th Regiment was recognized as showing outstanding bravery.


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