Being generation 1 5 competing versions of experience
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Being “Generation 1.5”: Competing Versions of Experience. Generation 1.5 ?. Methodology: Critical Ethnography In this study, I align myself with Benesch’s (2007) view that notions of identity and power are central to critical ethnography.

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Generation 1 5
Generation 1.5 ?

EDUC 867 Tim Mossman


Methodology: Critical Ethnography

In this study, I align myself with Benesch’s (2007) view that notions of identity and power are central to critical ethnography.

Unlike conventional ethnography, which is considered to be mostly descriptive, critical ethnography is deemed to be mainly reflective. Critical ethnographers take into account historical, political, sociological, and other macrocontextual factors that influence a person’s cultural life. They seek to pose probing questions at the boundaries of ideology, power, knowledge, class, race, and gender (Kumaravadivelu, 2008, p. 183).

[Critical Ethnography] take[s] into account poststructuralist notions of unequal power relations and their impact on social constructions of identity.  They problematize received categories, such as non-native, and develop complex portraits of students' identities through extensive interviews, classrooms observations, and examination of course materials and students written work (Benesch, 2007, p. 661).



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