Cultural conflicts of the 1920s
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Cultural Conflicts of the 1920s. 18 th Amendment – Prohibits the manufacture, sale, and transportation of intoxicating beverages. Defined the separation of values in the country and in the cities. Prohibition. Bootlegging. Originates from drinkers who would hide flasks in their boots.

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Prohibition

18th Amendment – Prohibits the manufacture, sale, and transportation of intoxicating beverages.

Defined the separation of values in the country and in the cities.

Prohibition


Bootlegging
Bootlegging

  • Originates from drinkers who would hide flasks in their boots.

  • In the 1920s it was used to describe anyone who could supply alcohol.

  • Bootleggers would either transport the alcohol from Canada or Mexico.

  • They would also run distilleries and make their own alcohol to sell.



Speakeasies

Illegally operated bars that would buy the alcohol from bootleggers.

Primarily located in cities.

A patron of the bar would need a membership card or a password to enter.

Speakeasies


Organized crime
Organized Crime bootleggers.

  • Regimented organizations that participated in one or many illegal ventures.

  • Bootlegging, gambling, prostitution, and racketeering.

  • Racketeering – means of controlling a neighborhood or city.

  • A racketeer would offer protection to people or businesses in exchange for a tribute.


Organized crime1
Organized Crime bootleggers.

  • If the tribute was not paid the person or business would face consequences.

  • In American cities gangland wars ravaged neighborhoods.

  • In Chicago alone 157 bombs targeted at homes and businesses were set off in one year.


Paul kelly a k a paolo antonio vacarelli
Paul Kelly, a.k.a. Paolo Antonio Vacarelli bootleggers.

The Five Pointers


Big jim colosimo
Big Jim Colosimo bootleggers.

Dale Winter



The four deuces
The Four Deuces bootleggers.


Al capone comes to chicago
Al Capone comes to Chicago bootleggers.

Frankie Yale


Big jim mudered torrio reigns
Big Jim mudered – Torrio Reigns bootleggers.

Flowers for the Mob

Dean O'bannion


Hymie weiss and bugs the north side gang
Hymie Weiss and Bugs bootleggers.“The North Side Gang”




Valentine s day
Valentine's Day bootleggers.


The untouchables
The Untouchables bootleggers.


Meyer lansky
Meyer Lansky bootleggers.



Frank costello
Frank Costello bootleggers.



Machine gun kelly
Machine Gun Kelly bootleggers.


Thompson gun
Thompson Gun bootleggers.


Bonnie parker
Bonnie Parker bootleggers.


Clyde barrow
Clyde Barrow bootleggers.


Bonnie and clyde
Bonnie and Clyde bootleggers.


The modern version
The Modern Version bootleggers.


  • "The American people . . . had expected to be greeted, when the great day came, by a covey of angels bearing gifts of peace, happiness, prosperity and salvation, which they had been assured would be theirs when the rum demon had been scotched.   Instead they were met by a horde of bootleggers, moonshiners, rum-runners, hijackers, gangsters, racketeers, trigger men, venal judges, corrupt police, crooked politicians, and speakeasy operators, all bearing the twin symbols of the Eighteenth Amendment--the Tommy gun and the poisoned cup."

    • Herbert Asbury –author of Gangs of New York


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