Unit XIII The Eighteenth-Century Concerto and Sonata

Unit XIII The Eighteenth-Century Concerto and Sonata PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Overview. As in the Baroque era, the term concerto implies the opposition of the large sound of the full orchestra (tutti) versus the smaller sound mass of the soloist.Unlike the Baroque concerto grosso, which employed a group of soloists ( the concertino), the classical concerto is most typically

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Unit XIII The Eighteenth-Century Concerto and Sonata

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1. Unit XIII The Eighteenth-Century Concerto and Sonata Chapter 37 - The Classical Concerto

2. Overview As in the Baroque era, the term concerto implies the opposition of the large sound of the full orchestra (tutti) versus the smaller sound mass of the soloist. Unlike the Baroque concerto grosso, which employed a group of soloists ( the concertino), the classical concerto is most typically a solo concerto.

3. Overview Piano and violin concertos are most prominent. Follows the 3-movement sonata cycle (fast-slow-fast).

4. Cadenza Characteristic feature - the orchestra falls silent and the soloist launches into a free play of fantasy on one or more themes of the movement. During this time the cadenza was usually composed on the spot during performance. Remember, the composer was usually the soloist at the premier during this time.

5. The Movements of the Concerto

6. First movement Double exposition sonata-allegro form Usually themes are presented first by the orchestra in full or partial completeness before being played by the soloist in complete form.

7. Second movement Largo, adagio, or andante. Features the soloist in poetic, songlike melody. Contrasting key to first and last movement.

8. Third movement (Finale) Generally an allegro molto or a presto. Usually shorter than the first movement. Rondo or sonata-rondo form.

9. Mozart: Piano Concerto in G Major, K. 453 (1784) Note Köchel number. Wrote six piano concertos in 1784

10. First movement: Allegro in double-exposition sonata allegro form. Opens with an orchestral ritornello Followed by piano with its own exposition and a new theme Orchestral ritornello also heard in recapitulation This concerto is usually heard with Mozart’s cadenza See Listening Guide 22, pp. 208 -209 (CD 2/29-39), for themes and analysis.

11. Second movement: Andante in C major Also double exposition form Supremely lyric Notable for variety of woodwind colors

12. Third movement: Presto in G major Theme and Variations Graceful, dance-like theme and five variations

13. Famous Women Virtuosos of the Eighteenth Century It was deemed proper in the 18th century for noblewomen and upper-class women to study music Many became highly skilled amateurs Composers - Elisabeth-Claude Jacquet de la Guerre

14. Famous Women Virtuosos of the Eighteenth Century Violinists Anna Maria della Pieta Maddelena Lombardini (student of Tartini)

15. Famous Women Virtuosos of the Eighteenth Century Keyboardists Maria Anna Mozart (Nannerl)(1751-1829) - sister of Wolfgang

16. Famous Women Virtuosos Maria Theresa von Paradis (1759-1808) Accomplished pianist and organist Remarkable musical memory - over 60 concertos memorized for her tour (1783-86) Mozart wrote his Piano Concerto in B flat K. 456 for her in 1784 Her teacher, Antonio Salieri wrote his only organ concerto in her honor Her works include 2 concertos, a piano trio and a number of sonatas have been lost

17. Famous Women Virtuosos of the Eighteenth Century Barbara von Ployer - Student of Mozart for whom he wrote 2 concertos

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