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Quarter Two Reading Informational Text. Grade 2 Teacher Directions C ommon F ormative A ssessment . Quarter Two Informational Text Common Formative Assessments Team Members and Writers Deborah AlvaradoGinger Jay Sara Retzlaff Haley ChristensenJenn Johnson Jami Rider

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Quarter Two Reading Informational Text

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Quarter two reading informational text

Quarter Two

Reading Informational Text

Grade 2

Teacher Directions

Common Formative Assessment


Quarter two reading informational text

Quarter Two Informational Text Common Formative Assessments

Team Members and Writers

Deborah AlvaradoGinger Jay Sara Retzlaff

Haley ChristensenJenn Johnson Jami Rider

Lindsay CrowellLaycee Kinsman Jennifer Robbins

Monica DarnallBerta Lule Martha Rodriguez

Diane DowAlfonso Lule Jill Russo

Liana DuranHeather McCullum Brent Saxon

Carrie EllisGina McLain Leslie Sell

Sheri FisherShawna Munson Erin Shepherd

Lindsay GarciaGustavo Olvera Niki Thoen

Stephanie GerigChristina Orozco Erin VanDyke

Brooke GodfreyGina Paulson StephanieWilkerson

Christine GoldmannTeresa Portinga Christina Walters

Jamie GoldsteinJudy Ramer

Melissa HancockErin Reamer

Thank you to all of those who reviewed and edited and a special appreciation to Vicki Daniel’s and her amazing editing skills.


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Important Information

  • This booklet is divided into two parts…

    • Teacher’s Resources and Answer Keys

      • Pages 1 – 10

    • Student Assessment (can be printed in a small booklet form)

      • Pages 11 – 31

      • This material is intended for assessing reading informational standards RI - 5,6 and 7 at the end of quarter two. Do NOT allow students to read the passages before the assessment. In quarter two, students are also assessed on Write and Revise (see page 5).

      • Student scores for the common formative assessments can be recorded on the Class Assessment Summary Sheet.

    • Printing Instructions…

    • Decide on the primary way to use this booklet, then choose one of the following ways to print this material.

    • You can print the entire 31 pages – then divide it into two sections (teacher and student). The student booklet would be on regular 8 ½ X 11.

    • OR…

    • Send to the HSD Print Shop:

    • Print Shop instructions for Small Student Booklet Format.

    • Print pages 11 – 31 in small student booklet format.

    • Set print driver properties to - - Original size 8 ½ x 11

    • Paper size = 11x17

    • Print type = Small Student Booklet


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  • Directions for Common Formative Assessment

  • Independent Readers:

  • Students read selections independently without reading assistance.

  • Students complete the selected response answers by shading in the bubble.

  • Students complete the constructed response answers by writing a response for each question.

  • Not Independent Readers: (Please indicate on record sheet if student is Not an Independent Reader)

  • Read the selection and questions aloud to the student in English or Spanish.

  • Read the selected response answers to the student.

  • Read the constructed response answers to the student. You may write the answer the student says unless he/she is able to do so.

  • Note: The constructed response questions do NOT assess writing proficiency and should not be scored as such. The constructed responses are evidence of reading comprehension.

  • Remind students to STOP on the stop page. Do not allow them to go on to the “happy face” page until you have scored their answers.

  • Assessment Class Summary Sheet (scoring)

  • When students have finished the entire assessment enter the total number of correct selected responses for each standard (0 – 5).

  • When students have completed the constructed response score ONLYwith a number from (0 – 3) as indicated by the constructed response rubric.

  • Write and Revise

  • The special section for Write and Revise includes six selected response questions. Write and Revise questions are not included on the assessment summary sheets. They are for your information and instruction.

  • DO NOT write recommendations for the student about why a score was incorrect in their test booklet. It is important for students to reflect on their own answers after the tests are scored on the reflection sheet (last page of student booklet).

  • Return the scored test booklets to the students. Students record their responses as correct or incorrect on page 30.

  • The last page in the student booklet is a reflection page (page 28). Students think about what they missed and why.

  • Present ONEspecific question for students to reflect on concerning incorrect answers. They can do this on their own, with a peer or with a teacher. Example reflections questions might include:

  • Ideas/Suggestions:

  • What did you not understand about the question?

  • Underline words you did not understand.

  • Rephrase the question.


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Write and Revise

The Common Core standards are integrative in nature. Student proficiency develops and is assessed on a continuum.

The HSD, Common Formative Assessment (CFA) for quarter two includes three write and revisecategories to prepare our students for this transition in conjunction with our primary focus of Reading Informational Text. Student results are for the teacher’s information and are not part of the assessment summary.

Quarter 2

Students “Read to Write” integrating basic writing and language revision skills.

Write and Revise Assessed Categories for Quarter Two

Writing: Write and Revise (revision of short text)

Language: Language and Vocabulary Use (accurate use of words and phrases)

Language: Edit and Clarify (accurate use of grammar, mechanics and syntax)

Quarter 3

Students write expanded constructed responses and move toward “Full Compositions.”

Quarter 4

Students respond to a prompt requiring integrative research as part of a “Performance Task” evidenced by a full composition, speech or visual display.


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SBAC Reading Assessment

Constructed Response General Template

Short Constructed Response

Short constructed response sample questions are designed to assess CCLS reading standards. These are single questions that ask students to respond to a prompt or question by stating their answer and providing textual evidence to support their answer.

The goal of the short response questions is to require students to show succinctly their ability to comprehend text. In responding to these questions, students will be expected to write in complete sentences.


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Quarter 2 CFA Constructed ResponseAnswer Key

Constructed Response RI.2.5

  • ?

8. What facts can you learn from Diagram 1? RI.2.5

Scoring Notes: “Teacher and Rubric Language”

Essential Elements: The essential element students should state for the question prompt is specific information seen only in Diagram 1.

Evidence of Understanding/Other Aspects: Evidence of the essential elements or other aspects students should mention include the purpose of the diagram (identifying where Bat Fungus has spread). Other aspects could be 22 U.S. States and 5 Canadian Provinces have bat fungus as well as the years the fungus has spread. Students may also include detailed information about specific states (but they are not labeled and not required). Students should not add extraneous details not related to the prompt.

Sentence Organization: Sentences should be logically ordered in such a way as to address the prompt without added information (such as student personal background experiences). Sentences should be varied in length as needed.


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Quarter 2 CFA Constructed ResponseAnswer Key

Constructed Response RI.2.7

  • ?

Describe how the text and the illustrations help readers understand more about the bat fungus.

Give examples from the text and illustrations. RI.2.7

Scoring Notes: “Teacher and Rubric Language”

Essential Elements: The essential element for the question prompt is describing how both the illustrations and text help readers understand about the bat fungus.

Evidence of Understanding/Other Aspects: Evidence of the essential element or other aspects students should mention include specific facts about the bat fungus from the text and illustrations. Some of the facts from the text should include descriptions of the fungus (white and on the nose, ears and wings) and that it is a mystery scientists have been trying to solve. Students should also reference the Fish and Wildlife Service as supporting the scientists. Facts from the glossary should also be mentioned. Facts from the illustrations students should include are how scientists are observing the bats. A reference to the bat photo is another aspect but not essential.

Sentence Organization: Sentences should be logically ordered in such a way as to address the prompt without added information (such as student personal background experiences). Sentences should be varied in length as needed.


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Quarter 2 CFA Constructed ResponseAnswer Key

Constructed Response RI.2.6

18. What is the author’s main purpose for writing Bat Facts? Give examples from the text. RI.2.6

Scoring Notes: “Teacher and Rubric Language”

Essential Elements: The essential element students should state for the question prompt is identifying the author’s main purpose using evidence from the text.

Evidence of Understanding/Other Aspects: Evidence of the essential element or other aspects students should mention include the title Bat Facts or allude to the idea of many facts about bats. Students should give 3-4 specific examples of bat-facts and details from the text. Other aspects can include references to the diagram and glossary but are not essential to the prompt.

Sentence Organization: Sentences should be logically ordered in such a way as to address the prompt without added information (such as student personal background experiences). Sentences should be varied in length as needed.


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Quarter 2 CFA Selected Response Answer Key


Quarter two reading informational text

Quarter Two

Reading Informational Text

Grade 2

Common Formative Assessment

Name_________________


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A Bat Mystery

Figure 1

Some bats are in trouble. They have an illness. Thousands of bats have died from it.

The bats get a white funguson their noses, ears, and wings. A fungus is a type of plant life that can make animals sick.

Scientistsdo not know why the bats are getting sick. They have been trying to solve the mysteryfor more than a year.

Figure 1 Caption: This scientist is observing bats with white fungus on their noses, ears, and wings.

“We’re trying to find out what this fungus is and where it came from,” says scientist Susi Von Oettingen.

Susi works for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “We’re trying to figure out if we can make the bats healthy again,” she says.

Figure 2

Figure 2 Caption: A fungus is a type of plant life that can make animals sick.


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Diagram 1


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Name ______________

According to the text caption under Figure 1 what is the scientist doing? RI.2.5

The scientist is finding out what the fungus is.

The scientist is observing bats with white fungus.

The scientist is making bats healthy.

The scientist is helping a bat.

2. According to the glossary, what is the

definition of the word mystery? RI.2.5

A mystery is a type of plant.

A mystery is something that is difficult to understand or explain.

A mystery is a person who studies science.

A mystery is more than one year.


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What does the label in Figure 2 show? RI.2.5

a scientist

a plant

a fish

D. a fungus

4. What is the author’s main purpose for writing this text? RI.2.6

The author wants to tell the reader about a mystery bat illness.

The author wants the reader to like bats.

The author wants readers to know that science is interesting.

The author wants to tell readers about the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.


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5. According to Diagram 1, which two countries have bats with White Nose Syndrome? RI.2.7

states and provinces

B. Canada and United States

C. Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean

D. Canada and Mexico

6. According to Diagram 1, how many U.S. states have bats with the White Nose Syndrome? RI.2.7

22

B. 5

C. 2006

D. 2012-2013


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7. How does the author describe White Nose Syndrome? RI.2.6

It is described as many bats in trouble.

B. It is described by scientists.

C. It is described as a white fungus on a bat’s nose, ears and wings.

D. It is described as a syndrome.


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Diagram 1

Bat Facts

1

Bats can be found almost anywhere in the world. But, they do not live where it is very cold or very hot.

2

Bats come in all sizes! The largest bats have wingspans of nearly six feet. The smallest bat is a little brown bat. It is only an inch big with its wings folded in.

3

Most bats eat insects. This helps control pests! A few other bats eat fruit, birds, lizards, frogs and even fish! A little brown bat can eat 1000 mosquitoes in an hour! Bats are nocturnal so they only eat at night.

4

Do you know how bats find things in the dark? They make sounds with their mouths. Then, the sounds bounce off of anything in their path. This sends an echo back to the bats on sound waves. The echoes tell the bats many things. Echoes can tell a bat the size of an object, if it is hard or soft,and how far away it is, all in a split second!

5

Bats live in caves, crevices, trees, and buildings. Some bats live alone while others live in large colonies. Some of the largest colonies have more than a million bats!

6

  • Bats are mammals. At birth a bat is called “a pup.” Bats give birth to only one pup at a time. The female bats take care of the bat pups in special shelters. The male bats do not help raise the pups.

  • 7

  • Most bats live longer than most mammals of their size. The longest known lifespan of a bat in the wild is 30 years for a little brown bat. 


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10. How is the bat in Diagram 1 finding things in the dark? RI.2.5

The bat can’t see in the dark.

The bat makes sounds that bounce off an object and sends back an echo.

Bats look for food in the dark.

The bat can hear objects in the dark and do not have to be able to see.

11. Which paragraph supports that colonies are a large group of animals or insects? RI.2.5

paragraph 1

paragraph 3

paragraph 5

paragraph 7


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12. According to the Bat Wingspan Diagram,

which bat has the longest wingspan? RI.2.5

Big Brown Bat

Little Brown Bat

They are all the same.

Flying Fox Bat

13. Which statement has information found in the text and the diagram about bat wingspans? RI.2.7

The Big Brown Bat has the largest bat wingspan and likes to eat insects.

The Flying Fox Bat has the longest wingspan.

The smallest bat is a little brown bat. It has a wingspan of 8 inches and is only an 1 inch big with its wings folded in.

Most bats eat insects and eat only at night.


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14. What information does the author include to let readers know that bats control pests? RI.2.6

Some bats eat fruit, fish, lizards, birds and even frogs.

Most bats eat insects. The little brown bat can eat 1,000 mosquitoes in an hour.

Bats can be pests.

Bats only eat at night.

15. Which bat may be able to live in the smallest place? RI.2.7

All bats can live in small places.

the Little Brown Bat

the Flying Fox Bat

the Big Brown Bat


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16. How does the author let the reader know that bats are nocturnal? RI.2.6

The author explains that bats eat many insects.

The author explains that bats eat many things.

The author explains that bats eat only at night.

The author explains that bats control pests.

17. What is the author’s main purpose for writing the text? RI.2.6

The author’s main purpose is to tell the reader many different facts about bats.

The author’s main purpose is to tell the reader how bats hunt in the dark.

The author’s main purpose is to tell the reader that bats make good pets.

The author’s main purpose is to tell the reader that the mother bat takes care of the pup.


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  • 19. Read the paragraph below. (Write and Revise W.2)

  • Bats live in caves, crevices, trees, and buildings. Some bats live alone while others live in large colonies. Some of the largest colonies have more than a million bats!

  • Which sentence would best fit with the paragraph?

  • Mother bats raise the baby bats called pups.

  • A tree is a good place for a bat to live.

  • There are many bats in the world.

  • Colonies are a large group of animals or insects.

20. Read the paragraph below: (Write and Revise W.2)

Bats eat different things. Most bats eat insects. This helps control pests! Most bats fly very fast. A few other bats eat fruit, birds, lizards, frogs and even fish!

Which sentence does not belong in the paragraph?

Most bats eat insects.

This helps control pests!

Most bats fly very fast.

A few other bats eat fruit, birds, lizards, frogs and even fish!


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21. A bat is a nocturnal animal. (Write and Revise L.2.4a)

Which word could be used to replace nocturnal?

scary

fast

daytime

night

22. Some bats live alone while others live in

colonies.

(Write and Revise L.2.4a)

Which word could be used to replace colonies?

groups

trees

crevices

darkness


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23. Read the letter below. (Write and Revise L.2.2b)

Dear Mr. Carter,

Thank-you for coming to my school to teach us about bats. It was fun to learn. I really liked seeing the bat you came with.

Your Friend

Tommy

Where should a comma be placed in the letter?

A. after Tommy

B. after Your

C. before Tommy

D. after Friend

24. Which greeting has the comma in the correct place?

(write and revise L .2.2b)

Dear, Mr. Snow

Dear Mr., Snow

,Dear Mr. Snow

Dear Mr. Snow,


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STOP

Close your books and wait for instructions!


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Student Self-Check


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