Dqc workshop
Download
1 / 94

DQC Workshop - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 81 Views
  • Uploaded on

DQC Workshop. Detroit Airport Westin - November 21, 2009 Wright Room, Westin Hotel. Agenda. MORNING 0730: Breakfast available (in meeting room) 0800-0830 Very quick introductions, including ‘New Participants Sound Bites’ - one thing you’d really like to change about Intro. Biology.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' DQC Workshop' - callie-rice


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Dqc workshop

DQC Workshop

Detroit Airport Westin - November 21, 2009

Wright Room, Westin Hotel


Agenda
Agenda

MORNING

  • 0730: Breakfast available (in meeting room)

  • 0800-0830 Very quick introductions, including ‘New Participants Sound Bites’ - one thing you’d really like to change about Intro. Biology.

  • 0830-0845 Overview: key project & workshop goals (Charlene)

  • 0845-1000 DQCs: What they are; Introduction to coding (Teams); Discussion (Andy et al.)

  • 0945-1000 Break

  • 1015-1100 DQCs – Background, Research findings, Discussion of how they can be used (includes research; Andy et al.)

  • 1100-1145 Ecology faculty: What they learned, What was surprising, Long-term advantages of the DQC project. Panel, posters, discussion

  • 1145-1215 LUNCH (provided)


Agenda1
Agenda

AFTERNOON

  • 1215-115 Using DQCs as formative tools with active teaching; Backwards design approach (Charlene, Alan, April) – Introduction & Teams

  • 115-145 Using the website (Alan and Ecology Faculty)

  • 145-200 Break

  • 200-215 Ideas about using the DQC project as the basis for SoTL (all)

  • 215-245 Teams: What’s not clear and questions – followed by discussion

  • 245-330 Teams work on plans – followed by quick report out

  • 330-400 Evaluation (Nancy Pelaez)


Introductions
Introductions

  • Very quick introductions, including ‘New Participants Sound Bites’ - one thing you’d really like to change about Intro. Biology.


Brief overview of DQC project

• Funded by 2 CCLI grants from NSF

• Key component is integration of education research on the DQCs and faculty development on use of DQCs in the classroom. Faculty are involved in this research.

• Our first grant focused on ecology faculty – from community and 4 year colleges and universities. We wanted to see how faculty from a broad range of institutions use the DQCs.

• For this second grant, all faculty are using the questions in Introductory Biology. You are also represent several sub-disciplines of biology.


Why “Questions”?

• For me, one key motivation was use of the FCI (Force Concept Inventory) in physics. It seemed to be useful in helping faculty focus more on key concepts - because by using the FCI as a pre-test, faculty saw the many, very basic things their students did not understand.

• Key question therefore – does use of the DQCs and associated active learning strategies truly change faculty’s teaching of Intro Bio – and how they think about teaching and learning of biology?

• We also asked “What Does it Take” for faculty to effectively incorporate use the DQCs into their teaching? Also, what does that “look like”?

• From the first project we learned - that incorporation of the questions/pedagogy into faculty’s courses was slower than we had anticipated. Also, presenting work in a poster session with other faculty in the project was a great motivator. Interestingly, faculty from across the institutions were dealing with many of the same issues.


  • Activities of the workshop

  • • DQCs: Andy Anderson et al.

    • Introduction to the questions, focus on coding student answers, some research findings, your involvement in the research, etc.

  • • Ecology faculty: their experiences with the project.

  • • DQCs as formative tools - with student-active teaching.

    • How to incorporate these into your course.

  • • Teams (and advisors): working together here, developing plans for the next two semesters.

  • • Ample time for questions and exchange

  • • Evaluation


  • Three Teams

  • • Biology Directors: Advisor is John Merrill (Randy Phillis)

  • • University Faculty: Advisors are Nancy Stamp, Heather Griscom, Laurel Hartley

  • • College Faculty: Advisors are Nicole Welch, Laurel Hartley, Kathy Williams, Barbara Abraham, April Maskiewicz

  • Ideal goal for groups 2 & 3: small groups of faculty working with an advisor who is at their school, in their area, or at a similar institution. “Working with” means email contact, conference calls, one-on-one – general collegial interactions. You all need to figure that out before your leave today (concrete plan).

  • • Biology Directors – were already a group, so you need to work together here to develop a game plan for use of the DQCs/active learning in a course, involvement in the research, and interaction during the semester.


Dqcs 8 45 11
DQCs (8:45-11)

  • Introduction to DQCs (Andy) 8:45-9:15

  • Coding and Discussion (Brook) 9:15-10

  • Research Findings (Laurel) 10:10-10:30

  • Cross Site DQC Research (Amelia) 10:30-11


Introduction to dqcs

Introduction to DQCs

Charles W. (Andy) Anderson


What i plan to talk about
What I Plan to Talk About

  • Understanding informal and scientific reasoning

  • Working through an example: octane burning

  • Framework and goals for carbon cycling (processes, matter and energy principles, scale, representations)



What s the problem
What’s the Problem?

Three ways of characterizing student difficulties

  • Inadequate knowledge: Misconceptions

  • Difficulties with practice: Tracing matter and energy

  • Informal and scientific discourse: Differences in “social languages”


Inadequate knowledge
Inadequate Knowledge

People have misconceptions: ideas that are scientifically incorrect

Carbon example: explaining weight loss in humans

  • Exercise “burns up” food (calories)

  • Gases don’t weigh much


Limitations of misconceptions explanations
Limitations of “Misconceptions” Explanations

  • Too many misconceptions: Our lists get so long that they aren’t useful any more

  • Why are there patterns in misconceptions about different processes?


Scientific practices from nrc report taking science to school
Scientific Practices (from NRC Report Taking Science to School)

Strands of scientific proficiency:

  • Know, use, and interpret scientific explanations of the natural world

  • Generate and evaluate scientific evidence and explanations

  • Understand the nature and development of scientific knowledge

  • Participate productively in scientific practices and discourse.


Practice tracing matter and energy
Practice: Tracing Matter and Energy

Students consistently have matter and energy appearing or disappearing, especially processes in which gases are converted to solids or liquids, or vice versa:

  • Combustion

  • Photosynthesis (plant growth)

  • Cellular respiration (animal weight loss, decay)

    They commonly use energy as a “fudge factor”


Limitations of practice explanations
Limitations of “Practice” Explanations

Persistence of unscientific practices

  • Why do students have so much difficulty tracing matter and energy?

  • Why don’t they even try?

  • What makes alternative explanations so attractive?

    Common patterns that seem to relate practices in different domains (e.g., carbon and biodiversity).


What do i mean by discourse
What Do I Mean by “Discourse?”

  • Discourse: “a socially accepted association among ways of using language, of thinking, and of acting that can be used to identify oneself as a member of a socially meaningful group” (Gee, 1991, p. 3)

  • Another term for discourses is “social languages” (as opposed to national languages such as English and Spanish) that are shared by communities of practice


Discourse informal and scientific reasoning
Discourse: Informal and Scientific Reasoning

  • Informal (Force-dynamic) reasoning (cf. Talmy, Pinker)

    • Events or processes happen because actors use their powers or abilities to achieve their purposes

    • Actors have needs that enable them to achieve their purposes

  • Scientific (principled or model-based) reasoning

    • Events or processes happen in hierarchically organized systems at multiple scales

    • Processes and systems conform to principles, including conservation of matter and energy, genetic continuity, etc.


Example of Scientific Accounts

(for Carbon)

Systems

Following

principles

At multiple scales

(energy input)

(energy output)

(matter output)

(matter input)

A complete scientific explanation describes processes

constrained by principles

in systems at multiple scales


Informal (Force-dynamic) Accounts

Actors

With Abilities

And Purposes

In Settings

(results that achieve purposes of actors)

(needs or enablers)

A complete force-dynamic explanation describes actors, enablers,

purposes, settings, and results


The practice of predicting in informal and scientific discourses
The Practice of Predicting in Informal and Scientific Discourses

  • Informal reasoning: Interplay of “forces” (needs, desires, willpower) determines course of events. The strongest “force” wins.

  • Scientific reasoning: The course of events can be predicted by applying laws (e.g., conservation of matter and energy) to hierarchically organized systems


Science education gives people choices
Science Education Gives People Choices Discourses

  • Most K-12 students and many adults: Dependent on informal discourse; scientific discourse is abstract, technical, incomprehensible

  • College science majors: Scientific discourse is thin veneer on informal reasoning about the world

  • Scientists: Can choose among discourses as the occasion demands; scientific discourse as default


2 analyzing an example question

2. Analyzing an Example Question Discourses

Octane Burning


Example question oxidation
Example Question: Oxidation Discourses

Gasoline is mostly a mixture of hydrocarbons such as octane: C8H18. Decide whether each of the following statements is true or false about what happens to the atoms in a molecule of octane when it burns.


Alternate forms of octane question
Alternate Forms of Octane Question Discourses

  • What happens to gasoline in a car’s engine? (informal)

  • Gasoline is mostly a mixture of hydrocarbons such as octane: C8H18. Decide whether each of the following statements is true or false about what happens to the atoms in a molecule of octane when it burns. (mixed)

  • Write a balanced equation for the combustion of octane (C8H18) in air. (scientific)


Informal explanation of combustion of octane
Informal Explanation of DiscoursesCombustion of Octane

  • The car (actor) has the ability to move if it has the things it needs, including a working engine, gasoline, and air. When the car burns gasoline inside its engine, the result is that the car has the energy to move.

  • Unfortunately, there is also another result, which is that the car pollutes the air when it burns the gasoline with carbon dioxide and other pollutants.


Scientific account of octane burning
Scientific Account of Octane Burning Discourses

The macroscopic events that we see and feel (hot engine, movement of the car) can be explained by events at the atomic-molecular scale:

  • Changes in matter: 2 C8H18 + 25 O2 16 CO2 + 18 H2O

  • Changes in energy:Chemical potential energy  thermal energy + kinetic energy

    Matter and energy are conserved


What do people understand
What Do People Understand? Discourses

Students Taking Pilot Test on Carbon-transforming processes

  • Science majors taking initial cell biology course at Michigan State University

  • College chemistry is prerequisite for course

  • 23 students answered this question on first day of class


True or false
True or False Discourses

  • Some of the atoms in the octane are incorporated into carbon dioxide in the air.

  • True is scientific answer

  • True is informal answer

  • 20/23 answered “true.”


True or false1
True or False Discourses

  • Some of the atoms in the octane are incorporated into air pollutants such as ozone or nitric oxide.

  • False is scientific answer (C and H atoms can’t become N and O atoms).

  • True is informal answer (One result of cars burning gasoline is air pollutants.)

  • 16/23 answered “true.”


True or false2
True or False Discourses

  • Some of the atoms in the octane are converted into energy that moves the car.

  • False is scientific answer (C and H atoms can’t be converted to energy).

  • True is informal answer (energy is a result of gasoline burning).

  • 15/23 answered “true.”


True or false3
True or False Discourses

  • Some of the atoms in the octane are incorporated into water vapor in the atmosphere.

  • True is scientific answer.

  • ? is informal answer (doesn’t seem unreasonable, but not something people talk about as a result of gasoline burning).

  • 15/23 answered “true.”




Concept framework
Concept Framework Discourses

Focusing on Scientific Models and Theories

  • Processes (Scientific Models)

  • Principles

  • Scales

  • Representations


Concept framework1
Concept Framework Discourses

  • Processes:

    Traditional focus of introductory biology courses: Models of structure and function at multiple scales

    Key processes for metabolism and carbon cycling.

    • Generation (photosynthesis, plant growth primary production)

    • Transformation (digestion, biosynthesis, plant and animal growth, food webs)

    • Oxidation (cellular respiration, combustion, animal movement, burning fuels, weight loss, energy pyramids)

  • Principles

  • Scales

  • Representations


Concept framework2
Concept Framework Discourses

  • Processes

  • Principles

    “Hidden curriculum” in many introductory biology courses: Constraints on all models of processes that are taken for granted by professors, stated but not understood or applied by students

    Key principles for metabolism and carbon cycling:

    • Conservation of Matter: Matter can neither be created nor destroyed

    • Conservation of Energy - Energy can neither be created nor destroyed

  • Scales

  • Representations


Concept framework3
Concept Framework Discourses

  • Processes

  • Principles

  • Scale

    All processes transform matter and energy and change systems at multiple scales.

    • Atomic-Molecular

    • Microscopic/Cellular

    • Macroscopic/Organismal

    • Large Scale/Ecosystems (Natural Ecosystems and Human-Influenced/Technology Systems)

  • Representations


Concept framework4
Concept Framework Discourses

  • Principles

  • Processes

  • Scales

  • Representations

    Typical representations: Make details of processes visible while principles are implicit.

    • Box-and-arrow diagrams

    • Chemical formulas and equations

    • Cartoons showing structure and function at multiple scales (subcellular, cellular, organismal, ecosystem)

      This afternoon: tools for reasoning as alternate representations that make principles more explicit and visible


Content framework
Content Framework Discourses


Dqcs for introductory biology
DQCs for Introductory Biology Discourses

  • DQCs organized around processes that generate, transform and oxidize organic carbon

    • Photosynthesis, including plant growth

    • Digestion and Biosynthesis

    • Respiration

  • Two Parallel DQCs for each process. Each DQC is limited to the front and back of one piece of paper.

  • Questions range from Atomic/Molecular to Ecosystem Scales

  • Most questions are asked at the organismal scale, but require reasoning at cellular and atomic/molecular scales.




Practice coding session
Practice Coding Session Discourses

  • Work through the “Coding Practice” worksheet in small groups to get a feeling for how to categorize student responses.


Dqc workshop detroit airport westin november 21 2009 wright room westin hotel
DQC Workshop DiscoursesDetroit Airport Westin - November 21, 2009Wright Room, Westin Hotel


Research goal
Research Goal Discourses

We investigated college students’ ability to apply the principles of conservation of matter and energy across scales when reasoning about biological processes that generate, transform, and oxidize organic carbon molecules.

*Faculty and students in organismal/ecologically focused classes.


Methods
Methods Discourses

  • Created Diagnostic Question Clusters (DQCs) to assess student understanding of the carbon cycle. DQCs

    • Combine questions in different formats: open response, multiple T/F, multiple choice, mixed

    • Are brief, take 15-20 minutes to complete

    • Require application and synthesis - don’t focus on details of biological processes

    • Are sometimes ambiguously worded to see whether students are attracted to vocabulary used in informal reasoning

    • Use items that were developed iteratively (ask open-ended questions, interview students, take common problems and use as distracters)

  • Classified each question based on the principle (conservation of matter or energy), process (photosynthesis, respiration, biosynthesis) and scale (atomic/molecular, organismal, ecosystem) it addressed


Methods1
Methods Discourses

  • Administered pre- and post-DQCs to 495 students at 12 institutions

  • In between the pre and post-tests, faculty used active teaching strategies that targeted principled reasoning about matter and energy

  • Faculty coded their own students’ responses. We recoded responses. Codes were “scientific”, “mixed”, “informal”, or “no data”.

  • Looked for quantitative trends (pre-post gains, differences in difficulty among processes, principles, and scales)

  • Looked for qualitative trends


Principle
Principle Discourses

  • Students did not have more difficulty with one principle than another.

  • There was a increase in level 1 and a decrease in level 3 answers following instruction.

1-Scientific

2-Mixed

3-Informal

4-No Data


Process
Process Discourses

  • Students did not have more difficulty with one process than another.

  • There was a increase in level 1 and a decrease in level 3 answers following instruction for each process, but not for questions requiring integration of multiple processes.

1-Scientific

2-Mixed

3-Informal

4-No Data


Scale
Scale Discourses

  • Students had more difficulty with questions posed at atomic-molecular scales than with questions posed at macroscopic scales.

  • There was a increase in level 1 and a decrease in level 3 answers following instruction.

1-Scientific

2-Mixed

3-Informal

4-No Data


Use of energy as a fudge factor
Use of Energy as a “Fudge Factor” Discourses

  • Students often chose distracters that indicated that they thought energy could become matter and matter could become energy.

  • Students often chose distracters that included energy disappearing, being “used up” or being “burned up”.

    • Indicates that they are drawn to words used in informal discourse

    • Indicates that they are drawing inappropriately narrow boundaries around systems which is a problem related to scale. Once energy leaves the boundaries, students no longer feel the need to account for it.

  • Use of energy as a “fudge factor” was more common when students were asked to reason at the atomic-molecular level


Use of energy as a fudge factor1
Use of Energy as a “Fudge Factor” Discourses

  • When the leaves in a compost pile decay, they lose mass. What do you think happens to the mass of the leaves? Circle True (T) or False (F)

  • T F The mass goes away when the leaves decompose.

  • T F The mass is converted to heat energy.

  • T F The mass is converted to soil minerals.

  • T F The mass is converted to carbon dioxide and water.

147 T and 301 F

243 T and 205 F

418 T and 43 F

271 T and 173 F


Use of energy as a fudge factor2
Use of Energy as a “Fudge Factor” Discourses

  • Which of the following are energy sources for plants? Please circle ALL correct answers.

  • Nutrients

  • Sunlight

  • Water

  • carbon dioxide

329 of 483

480 of 483

310 of 483

294 of 483

Allowing students to select multiple answers allows us to distinguish between a student who has the correct conception and a student who holds both correct and incorrect conceptions.


Students lack an understanding of atoms and molecules
Students lack an understanding of atoms and molecules Discourses

  • Without an understanding of the particulate nature of matter, students cannot trace matter and energy across scales. The are limited to reasoning only at the macroscopic level.

  • Students think molecules are equivalent in terms of the energy they contain.

  • Students think atoms can be converted to other atoms or they don’t use this as a constraining idea.

  • Students see overly simplified gas-gas and solid-solid cycles as a result of being uncomfortable with atoms and molecules.


Students lack an understanding of atoms and molecules1
Students lack an understanding of atoms and molecules Discourses

A potato is left outside and gradually decays. One of the main substances in the potato is the starch amylose ((C6H10O5)n). What happens to the atoms in amylose molecules as the potato decays? Choose True (T) or False (F) for each option.

T F Some of the atoms are converted into nitrogen and phosphorous: soil nutrients.

T F Some of the atoms are consumed and used up by decomposers.

T F Some of the atoms are incorporated into carbon dioxide.

T F Some of the atoms are converted into energy by decomposers.

T F Some of the atoms are incorporated into water.

277T, 165F

274T, 167F

315T, 122F

154T, 287F

228T, 212F


Students lack an understanding of atoms and molecules2
Students lack an understanding of atoms and molecules Discourses

  • Grandma Johnson had very sentimental feelings toward Johnson Canyon, Utah, where she and her late husband had honeymooned long ago. Because of these feelings, when she died she requested to be buried under a creosote bush in the canyon. Describe below the path of a carbon atom from Grandma Johnson’s remains, to inside the leg muscle of a coyote. Be as detailed as you can be about the various molecular forms that the carbon atom might be in as it travels from Grandma Johnson to the coyote. NOTE: The coyote does not dig up and consume any part of Grandma Johnson’s remains.


Students lack an understanding of atoms and molecules3
Students lack an understanding of atoms and molecules Discourses

  • Only 8% of 297 students traced the carbon from Grandman to the atmosphere. 41% traced carbon to the soil. 19% didn’t mention decomposition or respiration at all.

  • Only 5% of 297 students traced carbon from the atmosphere into the plants. 29% traced carbon from the soil to the plants, 17% traced soil minerals into the plant, and 19% said vaguely that Grandma Johnson’s remains would help the plants grow.


Students lack an understanding of atoms and molecules4
Students lack an understanding of atoms and molecules Discourses

  • Some other animal must have ate a part of Grandma Johnson then later the coyote ate that animal (GJ9)

  • The body will be broken down by decomposers and will be converted into oxygen, which will be used by the coyote and therefore travel inside the leg muscle of the coyote (A22). Grandma Johnson's remains (carbon atoms) could travel from the roots of the bush into the actual leaves of the bush, which may transfer into the air (carbon) with the rest of the carbon atoms. The coyote; needing oxygen to live would probably have consumed the carbon atom of Grandma Johnson's remains (GJ1).


Students have difficulty connecting scales
Students have difficulty connecting scales Discourses

  • When questions require students to follow matter and energy from an organismal to either an atomic-molecular or an ecosystem scale, they continue reasoning at an organismal scale.


Students have difficulty connecting scales1
Students have difficulty connecting scales Discourses

The figure below shows changes in concentration of carbon dioxide over a 47-year span at Mauna Loa observatory in Hawaii.

Why do you think this graph shows atmospheric carbon dioxide levels decreasing in the summer and fall?


Students have difficulty connecting scales2
Students have difficulty connecting scales Discourses

Why do you think this graph shows atmospheric carbon dioxide levels decreasing in the summer and fall?

  • Less people are driving in the summer and fall

  • Because of the annual cycle on the graph it shows during mayish area it droppy [drops] and raising [rises] again in winter

  • People not heating houses: People are not producing carbon dioxide because they stop heating their houses after winter

  • I have no clue, but maybe the warmer temperatures somehow allow for more CO2 to escape the atmosphere.

  • Because trees intake CO2 and there are more trees in the summer and fall.


Conclusions
Conclusions Discourses

  • Most students use a mix of principled and informal reasoning when asked questions that require application of synthesis.

  • Principled reasoning is difficult for students most likely because

    • They lack the necessary understanding of atoms and molecules.

    • They reason about mega or micro-scale phenomena by inappopriately applying cultural models or their own embodied experiences, both of which are situated in the macroscopic world.

  • Theories about language and informal reasoning may be useful in interpreting why students have difficulty moving from informal to scientific discourse. Students look for “actors” that drive processes. They have trouble thinking of atoms, molecules, and cells as actors. When they think about organisms as actors, they are precluded from thinking about the components/cells within the actors, making it hard to move across scales.


Conclusions1
Conclusions Discourses

  • Science instructors at multiple levels and in multiple domains need to help students see the necessity of principled reasoning and how their cultural models interfere with principled reasoning and to alter their course-taking practices.

  • This doesn’t mean that we can forgo the details. Instructors need to give students to tools that enable them to connect the details of course content and student responses to the principles behind them.


Biodqc research 2010
BIODQC Research - 2010 Discourses

GOALS

1. Diagnose student reasoning across a range of institutions about processes involved in carbon and energy movement in biological systems.

2. Analysis of changes in student reasoning following teaching activities from the BIODQC project.

3. Combine DQC results with simultaneous K-12 work to construct learning progressions that span K-16 grade levels.


Biodqc research 20101
BIODQC Research - 2010 Discourses

Instructions for participating in DQC Research

1. Administer Pretest at the beginning of spring semester.

  • Pick at least one set of DQCs (e.g. Photosynthesis).

  • Administer an equal mixture of both forms (A & B). Use paper and pencil in class OR course software outside of class.

  • Transcribe student responses to DQC data entry workbook & code student responses.

  • Examine student understanding to inform your teaching.

    2. During semester, utilize at least one active teaching exercise in class, specifically addressing problems in student reasoning identified with DQCs.


Biodqc research 20102
BIODQC Research – 2010 Discourses

3. Administer Post test at the end of the spring semester.

  • Use the same DQCs as pretest.

  • Administer an equal mixture of both forms (A & B). Use paper and pencil in class OR course software outside of class.

  • Transcribe student responses to DQC data entry workbook & code student responses.

  • Examine changes in student reasoning to reflect on the efficacy of instruction.

    4. Send completed DQC data entry workbook to Brook Wilke at Michigan State ([email protected]).

    5. Participate in cross site data synthesis and analyses.


Data collection questions
Data Collection Questions Discourses

  • How are you collecting data?

    • Paper/pencil tests

    • Online (course management software)

  • Access to information about students?

    • Gender

    • Ethnicity

    • Major

    • Age

    • Level (freshman, sophomore…)

    • GPA


Internal review board
Internal Review Board Discourses

  • This research involves human subjects, which means that IRB approval is needed in order to exchange, present or publish data. After identifying faculty members interested in research participation, we will need to approach IRB at Michigan State University about adding faculty from other institutions as researchers on the Michigan State IRB application. You may need to submit an IRB application at your own institution if proposal required by your institution.


Ecology faculty panel 11 11 45
Ecology Faculty Panel (11-11:45) Discourses

  • What they learned,

  • What was surprising,

  • Long-term advantages of the DQC project.

    • Panel,

    • posters,

    • discussion




Class Discourses

Class

Class

Reflect on data

Reflect on data

Focus even more on problem thinking

Focus on problematic thinking

Introduce topic

Some DQC Questions -Pretest

Some DQC Questions –Post-test

S-A activity - “clicker question”

S-A activity

Between class

Between class

Talk with students


Plan your way to change

Plan Your Way to Change Discourses

Backward Design

Wiggins and McTighe


  • Stage 1: Identify desired results Discourses

  • Stage 2: Determine acceptable evidence

  • Stage 3: Plan

    • pre-test, DQC

    • learning experiences, teaching activities

    • instruction

    • formative evaluation, all kinds of stuff

    • post-test, DQC


Matter energy process tool
Matter & Energy Process Tool Discourses

  • Scaffolds student reasoning about matter and energy transformations

  • Flexible: useful for a variety of biological processes as well as multiprocess event chains

  • Also accept variable levels of detail from students, depending on class level and goals


Matter & Energy Process Tool Discourses

(energy input)

(energy output)

(matter output)

(matter input)

Scale:


Matter & Energy Process Tool Discourses

(energy input)

(energy output)

(matter output)

(matter input)

Scale:


Matter & Energy Process Tool Discourses

Heat

Light energy

Chemical Potential Energy (Glucose)

(energy input)

(energy output)

(matter output)

(matter input)

Carbon Dioxide

Glucose

Water

Scale: Cellular

Oxygen


Matter & Energy Process Tool Discourses

(energy input)

(energy output)

(matter output)

(matter input)

Scale:


Matter & Energy Process To Discoursesol

Heat

Chemical Potential Energy

Chemical Potential Energy

(energy input)

(energy output)

(matter output)

(matter input)

Feces

Food molecules (i.e.-starch, fatty acids)

Carbon Dioxide

Scale: Cellular

Water

Biomolecules


Matter & Energy Process Tool Discourses

(energy input)

(energy output)

(matter output)

(matter input)

Scale:


Matter & Energy Process Tool Discourses

Heat

Chemical Potential Energy (Glucose)

Mechanical Energy

(energy input)

(energy output)

(matter output)

(matter input)

Glucose

Carbon Dioxide

Oxygen

Scale: Cellular

Water


Light Energy Discourses

Photosynthesis

Chemical Energy

Grass Growth Biosynthesis

Chemical Energy

Rabbit Growth

Biosynthesis

Chemical Energy

Wolf Growth

Biosynthesis

Carbon Dioxide (gas)

Sugar & Starch in Grass Structure (solid)

Water (liquid)

Grass Structure (solid)

Rabbit Body Structure (solid)

Cellular

Respiration

Cellular

Respiration

Cellular Respiration

CO2 (gas)

HEAT

CO2 (gas)

Motion Energy

CO2 (gas)

Motion Energy

H2O (gas/liquid)

H2O (gas/liquid)

HEAT

H2O (gas/liquid)

HEAT

Matter Cycles

Energy Flows


Powers of 10 chart
Powers of 10 Chart Discourses

Benchmark

Scales:

Atomic-

molecular

Microscopic

Macroscopic

Large-scale


Molecular models
Molecular Models Discourses

Modeling processes with

molecular models:

Enacts conservation of matter in a concrete form

Makes the process ofbalancing chemical equations meaningful


Dqc website alan
DQC Website (Alan) Discourses

  • 1:15-1:45


Dqc s and sotl
DQC’s and SoTL Discourses

  • 2:00 – 2:15


Teamwork
Teamwork Discourses

  • 2:15-2:45

  • Team Discussion followed by Group Discussion.

    • Questions, what’s not clear?


Teamwork1
Teamwork Discourses

  • 2:45-3:30

  • Work in teams to plan for implementing DQCs


Evaluation
Evaluation Discourses

  • 3:30-4:00


ad