Inventing a really bad sort it seemed like a good idea at the time
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Inventing A Really Bad Sort: It Seemed Like A Good Idea At The Time. Jim Huggins Kettering University [email protected] http://www.kettering.edu/~jhuggins. Bless me, Father Knuth, for I have sinned …. The Set-Up.

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Inventing A Really Bad Sort: It Seemed Like A Good Idea At The Time

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Inventing a really bad sort it seemed like a good idea at the time

Inventing A Really Bad Sort:It Seemed Like A Good Idea At The Time

Jim Huggins

Kettering University

[email protected]

http://www.kettering.edu/~jhuggins


Inventing a really bad sort it seemed like a good idea at the time

Bless me, Father Knuth, for I have sinned …


The set up

The Set-Up

Writing questions for take-home exam for Advanced Algorithms course (sophomore)

Desired: an algorithm which:

  • does something useful

  • is simple to analyze

  • hasn’t been done before on the web


Inspiration stoogesort

Inspiration: StoogeSort

public void StoogeSort(int[] arr, int start, int stop) {

if (arr[start] > arr[stop]) {

int swap = arr[start];

arr[start] = arr[stop];

arr[stop] = swap;

}

if (start+1 >= stop)

return;

int third = (stop - start + 1) / 3;

StoogeSort(arr, start, stop-third); // First two-thirds

StoogeSort(arr, start+third, stop); // Last two-thirds

StoogeSort(arr, start, stop-third); // First two-thirds

}

Comparison count:

T(n) = 3T(⅔n) + 1; T(0)=0, T(1)=0, T(2) = 1

T(n) = Θ(nlog3/2 3) ≈ Θ(n2.7)


My idea goofysort

My Idea: GoofySort

public void goofySort (int[] array, int start, int stop) {

if (start>=stop) return;

goofySort(array, start, stop-1); // first n-1 items

if (array[stop-1] > array[stop]) {

int swap = array[stop-1]; // swap last item

array[stop-1] = array[stop];

array[stop] = swap;

goofySort(array, start, stop-1); // first n-1 items

}// again

}

An added bonus: different behavior in best case, worst case. (More questions!)


Analysis of goofysort best case

Analysis of GoofySort: Best Case

public void goofySort (int[] array, int start, int stop) {

if (start>=stop) return;

goofySort(array, start, stop-1);

if (array[stop-1] > array[stop]) { // best case: false

int swap = array[stop-1];

array[stop-1] = array[stop];

array[stop] = swap;

goofySort(array, start, stop-1);

}

}

Comparison count:

T(n) = T(n-1) + 1, T(1) = 0

T(n) = O(n)


Analysis of goofysort worst case

Analysis of GoofySort: Worst Case

public void goofySort (int[] array, int start, int stop) {

if (start>=stop) return;

goofySort(array, start, stop-1);

if (array[stop-1] > array[stop]) { // worst case: true

int swap = array[stop-1];

array[stop-1] = array[stop];

array[stop] = swap;

goofySort(array, start, stop-1);

}

}

Comparison count:

T(n) = 2T(n-1) + 1, T(1) = 0

T(n) = O(2n)


Inventing a really bad sort it seemed like a good idea at the time

“Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct, not tried it.”


And so to avoid embarrassment

And so, to avoid embarrassment …

  • Coded the algorithm in Java

  • Tested with a variety of random inputs

  • Tested with a variety of list sizes20, 30, 40, …

  • And it all works! Great!(What could possibly go wrong?)


Actual student answers

Actual Student Answers:

  • T(n) = O(n3)

  • T(n) = T(n-1) + O(n2) = O(n3)

  • T(n) = T(n-1) + Σ1n i = ?

  • T(n) = O(2n)

    • One bright student, at least!


Preparing to hand them back

Preparing to hand them back…

  • Preparing my rant …

    • “you completely missed the point”

    • “we did this in class … ”

    • “I even tested this on lots of inputs ...”

  • And then I remember:

    • If this is really exponential time, how did I run it on an input of size 40?

    • @#@!. What if I’m wrong and they’re right?


Bentley three beautiful quicksorts

Bentley: Three Beautiful Quicksorts

Paraphrasing:

“If you double the input size, and the instruction count quadruples, you’ve got a quadratic algorithm.”

(Watch the Google TechTalk … it’s neat.)


Racing to the computer

Racing to the computer

Take the average over 100 random runs …

@#$!. It looks like it’s cubic!


How could this be cubic

How could this be cubic?

public void goofySort (int[] array, int start, int stop) {

if (start>=stop) return;

goofySort(array, start, stop-1);

if (array[stop-1] > array[stop]) {

int swap = array[stop-1];

array[stop-1] = array[stop];

array[stop] = swap;

goofySort(array, start, stop-1);

}

}

The first recursive call is always bad;the array could be completely unordered

The second recursive call is always good;all but the last item are ordered


How badly cubic

How badly cubic?

  • What’s the worst case input?

    • Reverse sorted, right?

  • At this point, I don’t trust myself, so …

    • Generate all permutations on a list of size n

      • We just covered this in class! (Lucky this is an algorithms course!)

    • Verified: worst case happens in reverse order


So what s the worst case time

So, what’s the worst-case time?

  • Do a bunch of input sizes …

  • … and putz around with a calculator …

  • The closed-form formula appears to be:T(n) = n(n-1)(n-2)/6 + (n-1)

  • So this does appear to be cubic after all.(Now, how do I prove it?)


A quick overview of the proof

A quick overview of the proof

  • T(n) = 1 + T(n-1) + GT(n-1); T(1) = 0

  • GT(n) = (n-1) + GT(n-1); GT(1) = 0…GT(n) = n(n-1)/2

  • T(n) = 1 + T(n-1) + (n-1)(n-2)/2; T(1) = 0…T(n) = (n-1) + n(n-1)(n-2)/6

    (see me for the full proof … it’s not that bad)


Aftermath

Aftermath

  • Deep apologies to the students

    • They were gracious

  • Q: “How did y’all know it was cubic?”A: “We ran it and it looked cubic.”

    • They had no idea how to proceed …so they did the empirical analysis first to find the “right” answer!


Inventing a really bad sort it seemed like a good idea at the time

“Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct, not tried it.”


Inventing a really bad sort it seemed like a good idea at the time

“Beware of bugs in the above analysis; I have only proved it correct, not verified it empirically.”


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