Lead in
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 72

Lead In PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 93 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Lead In. Listen to the following passage and try to fill the missing words in the blanks.

Download Presentation

Lead In

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Lead in

Lead In


Lead in

Listen to the following passage and try to fill the missing words in the blanks.

You will hear the passage three times. When the passage is read for the first time, you should listen carefully for its original idea. When the passage is read for the second time, you are required to fill in the blanks with the exact words you have just heard. Finally, when the passage is read for the third time, you should check what you have written.

Turn to p. 96, and let’s listen.


Lead in

First time

The purpose of education is not only to train youngsters for the 1)____________, but to prepare them for tomorrow’s society. Because of the rapidly changing world, one can argue that changes will be continuous, which will make lifelong learning necessary for those who expect to 2)____________ successfully. While some may argue that their education commenced when they began school and 3)____________ when they had completed it, modern reality suggests that education is a lifelong process, and the classroom is merely the beginning of the education process. The 4)____________ of its definition implies that education is lifelong.

Lifelong education 5)____________ and affects all existing educational providers, and extends beyond the formal educational providers to include all bodies and individuals 6)____________ learning activities.

Lifelong education means enabling people to learn at different times, in different ways, for different purposes 7)____________ of their lives and careers.

2nd time


Lead in

Second time

The purpose of education is not only to train youngsters for the 1)____________, but to prepare them for tomorrow’s society. Because of the rapidly changing world, one can argue that changes will be continuous, which will make lifelong learning necessary for those who expect to 2)____________ successfully. While some may argue that their education commenced when they began school and 3)____________ when they had completed it, modern reality suggests that education is a lifelong process, and the classroom is merely the beginning of the education process. The 4)____________ of its definition implies that education is lifelong.

Lifelong education 5)____________ and affects all existing educational providers, and extends beyond the formal educational providers to include all bodies and individuals 6)____________ learning activities.

Lifelong education means enabling people to learn at different times, in different ways, for different purposes 7)____________ of their lives and careers.

3rd time


Lead in

Third time

The purpose of education is not only to train youngsters for the 1)____________, but to prepare them for tomorrow’s society. Because of the rapidly changing world, one can argue that changes will be continuous, which will make lifelong learning necessary for those who expect to 2)____________ successfully. While some may argue that their education commenced when they began school and 3)____________ when they had completed it, modern reality suggests that education is a lifelong process, and the classroom is merely the beginning of the education process. The 4)____________ of its definition implies that education is lifelong.

Lifelong education 5)____________ and affects all existing educational providers, and extends beyond the formal educational providers to include all bodies and individuals 6)____________ learning activities.

Lifelong education means enabling people to learn at different times, in different ways, for different purposes 7)____________ of their lives and careers.

Check up


Lead in

The purpose of education is not only to train youngsters for the 1)__________________, but to prepare them for tomorrow’s society. Because of the rapidly changing world, one can argue that changes will be continuous, which will make lifelong learning necessary for those who expect to 2)________________ successfully. While some may argue that their education commenced when they began school and 3)__________ when they had completed it, modern reality suggests that education is a lifelong process, and the classroom is merely the beginning of the education process. The 4)__________ of its definition implies that education is lifelong.

employment market

handle the changes

concluded

very nature


Lead in

Lifelong education 5)_________ and affects all existing educational providers, and extends beyond the formal educational providers to include all bodies and individuals 6)___________ learning activities.

Lifelong education means enabling people to learn at different times, in different ways, for different purposes 7)_______________ of their lives and careers.

builds on

involved in

at various stages


Lead in

Two questions based on this short passage

  • Why do we receive various stages of education?

  • What is lifelong education? Why do we need it?


Lead in

Passage A

Tongue-tied

  • Content awareness

  • Language Points

  • Language Focus


Lead in

Tongue-tied

1. Tongue-tied; an understanding of the title

2. A narration---telling a story

  • Who

  • When

  • Where

  • What


Lead in

3. Language of mental descriptions

description of “my” thoughts

4. What made the author reluctant to tell the truth?


Lead in

Tongue-tied

Several weeks ago I was riding in a cab when the driver’s eyes caught mine in the rear view mirror and he said, “Excuse me, Miss? Can you help me?”

As any hard-bitten city dwellerknows, the correct answer to a question like “Can you help me?” should always be some version of “It depends.” I chirped, “Sure.”

“Thank you,” he said. He passed a slip of yellow paper into the back seat.

I stared at the paper, wondering. Was this a joke? A threat? Hand-printed on the paper in tiny block letters was this:

proverb

peculiar

idiomatic


Lead in

“Please,” he said. “What is the meaning of these words?”

I stared at the words in the distressed way you might stare at party guests whose faces you’ve seen somewhere before but whose names have escaped your mind. Proverb? Peculiar? Idiomatic? How on earth should I know? It’s one thing to use a word, it’s another to explain it. I resorted to shifting the topic.

“Where did you get these words?”

The driver explained that he was Pakistani. He listened to the radio as he drove and often jotted down unfamiliar, fascinating words whose meanings and spellings he then sought from his passengers.

“Peculiar,” he said. “What does this mean?”

I could manage that one. “Strange,” I said. “Odd. Often with a hint of something suspicious.”

“Thank you, Miss. And idiomatic?”


Lead in

I cleared my throat. “Um, it’s a, well, um. It involves a peculiar use of the language.”

I thought my use of peculiar was kind of clever. He looked confused, a reminder that clever’s not clever if it doesn’t communicate.

“Uh, let’s see. ‘Idiomatic’ is related to the word ‘idiom’. An idiom’s something that’s used in, say, a particular part of the country or by a particular group of people. People who aren’t part of that group aren’t likely to use it and might not understand it.”

Watching his puzzled look, I did what a person often does when at a lossfor the right words: I went on talking, as if a thousand vague words would add up to one accurate definition.

“Can you give me an example?”

I racked my brains. “Gapers block,” I said. A peculiarly Chicago phrase.


Lead in

But did it really qualify as idiomatic? I had no idea because the longer I thought about idioms the less sure I was what they were.

“And proverb?”

I should have told the poor man right then that I might be misleading him down the proverbial path, whatever that really means, but instead I said, “I think a proverb is kind of like an aphorism. But not quite.”

“A what?”

“Never mind. A proverb is a condensed saying that teaches you a lesson.”

“An example?”

The meterclicked off a full 20 cents while I searched madly through my mind. “Haste makes waste?” I finally whimpered.


Lead in

But was that a proverb? Wait. Weren’t proverbs actually stories, not just phrases? While I was convincing myself they were, he said, “Can an idiom be a proverb?”

I could answer that. Just not right now, now when it mattered, now when the fate of a curious, intelligent immigrant hung onthe answers he assumed would fall from a native speaker’s tongue as naturally as leaves from an October tree. So I retreated.

“Do most of your passengers give you answers when you ask for definitions?”

“Oh, yes, Miss. Very interesting definitions.”


Lead in

Until that moment, I’d been so inspired by the driver’s determination to learn English, so enthralled by the chance to indulge my curiosity about words with another curious soul, that I didn’t fully grasp the potential for linguistic fraudcommitted in this man’s cab. Now I could barely allow myself to imagine what kind of deformed English he was being fed by cowards like me who couldn’t simply say, “I don’t really know my own language.”

I can only trust that someone as curious as he is also owns a dictionary. And that he figures out that, no matter what his passengers may say, haste doesn’t always make waste at the gapers block.


Lead in

reara.

— of, at or located in the back

  • Examples

  • The thief broke into the house through the rear window.

  • She doesn’t like sitting in the rear seat.

rear end


Lead in

peculiara.

— unusual and strange, sometimes in an unpleasant way

  • Examples

  • What a peculiar smell!

  • She has the most peculiar ideas.

Translate

The fish has a peculiar taste. Do you think it's all right?

Key

这鱼有一种怪味道。你看有问题没有?


Lead in

resort n.

— 1)a strategy or course of action that may be adopted to resolve a difficult situation.

  • Example

  • He took back the house, without resort to legal action.

More to learn


Lead in

resort n.

— 2)a place that is a popular destination for holidays or recreation

  • Example

  • In recent years this place has grown into a fashionable ski resort.

More to learn


Lead in

resort to

— to use, adopt, a particular means to achieve one’s ends

  • Examples

  • Terrorists resorted to bombing city centers as a means of achieving their political aims.

  • We are prepared to resort to force if negotiation failed.


Lead in

jotv.

— to make a quick short note

  • Examples

  • Could you jot (down) your address and phone number in my address book?

  • Professor Smith advised that we always carry a pen and a notebook with us for jotting (down) our ideas.


Lead in

hintn.

— a slight indication of a fact, wish, etc.

  • Examples

  • Didn’t she even give you a hint where she was going?

  • The lady coughed politely as the man lit his cigarette, but he didn’t take the hint.

Fill in the blank

The politician tried to ______ (避免任何丑闻的迹象)。

Key

avoid any hint of scandal


Lead in

confusev.

—to mix up (someone’s mind or ideas), or to make (something) difficult to understand

  • Examples

  • I was so confused in today’s history lesson ― I didn’t understand a thing!

  • You’re confusing the little boy! Tell him slowly and one thing at a time.

More to learn


Lead in

Hang on

1 … ,please.

2 …, we will be there for you as soon as possible.

3 …


Lead in

At a loss

feel at a loss

do it at a loss


Lead in

vaguea.

— 1)not clearly described or expressed

  • Example

  • The patient complained of vague pains and backache.

More to learn


Lead in

vaguea.

— 2)not clear in shape, or not clearly seen

  • Example

  • Through the mist I could just make out a vague figure.

More to learn


Lead in

vaguea.

— 3)(of a person) not able to think clearly, or, not expressing one’s opinions clearly

  • Example

  • My aunt is incredibly vague ― she can never remember where she’s left things.


Lead in

rackv.

— to cause physical or mental pain or trouble to

  • Example

  • Even at the end, when cancer racked his body, he was calm and cheerful.

More to learn


Lead in

rack one’s rain

— to think very hard

  • Example

  • I’ve racked my brains all day but I still can’t work out a plan.


Lead in

qualifyv.

— to (cause to) reach a necessary standard

  • Examples

  • Chris has just qualified as a doctor.

  • Ann’s disappointed that she hasn’t qualified for the next round in the tennis competition.

More to learn


Lead in

qualificationn.

— 1)an official record that a person has achieved the necessary standard of knowledge or skill in a subject, usually after studying or training and passing an exam

  • Example

  • You’ll never get this job if you don’t have any qualifications in science.

More to learn


Lead in

qualificationn.

— 2)an ability, characteristic or experience that makes you suitable for a particular job or activity

  • Example

  • Some nursing experience is a necessary qualification for this job.


Lead in

misleadv.

— to lead in a wrong way

  • Examples

  • The wrong record of the patient misled the doctors in their probe for the cause of his disease.

  • Advertisements may mislead consumers into buying things that they don’t need.

Translate

Don’t let his friendly manner ____ (使你误信了他).

Key

mislead you into trusting him


Lead in

assumev.

— suppose to be the case, without proof

  • Examples

  • Do you assume that such information has significant effects on stock market?

  • We can’t assume the suspects to be guilty simply because they’ve decided to remain silent.

More to learn


Lead in

assumptionn.

— a thing that is accepted as true or as certain to happen without proof

  • Example

  • On the assumption that oil price would go up, some gasoline stations started to increase their stock.

Cf.

conclusion

A reasonable conclusion could be drawn based on some valid assumptions.


Lead in

retreatv.

— to move back

  • Examples

  • Attacks by enemy aircraft forced the tanks to retreat from the city.

  • The writer retreated to a place in the mountains to put his thoughts on paper.


Lead in

enthrallv.

— to hold the complete attention and interest of someone as if by magic

  • Examples

  • The World Cup completely enthralled people all over the world.

  • The audience was enthralled for two hours by a sparkling dramatic performance.


Lead in

indulgev.

—to allow (a person, oneself) to satisfy his or one’s desires

  • Examples

  • Occasionally the busy scientist would indulge his passion for fishing.

  • His wife indulged him with breakfast in bed.

Translate

Mother indulges her children too much.

Key

妈妈对她的孩子太放任了。

More to learn


Lead in

indulge in

— allow oneself the pleasure of

  • Example

  • She occasionally indulges in the luxury of a good chocolate bar.


Lead in

fraudn.

— a person or thing that is not what is claimed to be

  • Examples

  • John told everyone he was a well-known musician, but we know he was only a fraud.

  • The picture, which was claimed to be a real Picasso, turned out to be a fraud.


Lead in

commitv.

— to do (something illegal or considered wrong)

  • Examples

  • Strict measures will be taken in the public places to give criminals less opportunity to commit the crime.

  • Police officers arrested a 22-year-old mechanic on suspicion of committing an attempted murder on Oct. 22.


Lead in

hasten.

— (too much) speed

  • Examples

  • Unfortunately the report was prepared in haste and contained several inaccuracies.

  • Marry in haste, repent at leisure.

Cf.

Haste makes waste.

— When we do things too quickly we are likely to end up with poor, useless and sometimes costly results.


Lead in

any hard-bitten city dwellers

toughened by experience

Dwell

reside; to speak or write at length;

kept dwelling on what went wrong

dwelt on the need to trim the budget


Lead in

Proverb: A short, pithy saying in frequent and widespread use that expresses a basic truth or practical precept.

Idiomatic: A speech form or an expression of a given language that is peculiar to itself grammatically or cannot be understood from the individual meanings of its elements, as in keep tabs on.

Peculiar: Distinct from all others;odd


Lead in

hasten.

— (too much) speed

  • Examples

  • Unfortunately the report was prepared in haste and contained several inaccuracies.

  • Marry in haste, repent at leisure.

Cf.

Haste makes waste.

— When we do things too quickly we are likely to end up with poor, useless and sometimes costly results.


Lead in

  • He looked confused, a reminder that clever’s not clever if it doesn’t communicate.


Lead in

  • Until that moment, I’d been so inspired by the driver’s determination to learn English, so enthralled by the chance to indulge my curiosity about words with another curious soul, that I didn’t fully grasp the potential for linguistic fraudcommitted in this man’s cab.


Lead in

  • And that he figures out that, no matter what his passengers may say, haste doesn’t always make waste at the gapers block.


Lead in

  • Language Focus

  • Vocabulary (Ex. 4)

  • Phrases(Ex. 5)

  • Read and Translate(Ex. 6)

  • Read and Simulate(Ex. 7)


Lead in

Ex. 4Fill in the blanks with the words or expressions given below. Change the form where necessary.

assume commit confuse hint mislead

peculiar puzzle qualify retreat vague

1.Being the son of a professor does not ______ him for the scholarship consideration.

  • qualify

2.The police suspect that it was John who ______ the murder.

  • (had) committed


Lead in

Ex. 4Fill in the blanks with the words or expressions given below. Change the form where necessary.

assume commit confuse hint mislead

peculiar puzzle qualify retreat vague

3.So far, the new manager has given little ______ that he won’t be any different from the former one. .

  • hint

4.From all the indications, it is safe to ______ that the prices of cars will go down by large margins.

  • assume


Lead in

Ex. 4Fill in the blanks with the words or expressions given below. Change the form where necessary.

assume commit confuse hint mislead

peculiar puzzle qualify retreat vague

5.Some of his instructions are outdated and others are too ______ to be understood.

  • vague

6.The local dialect sounds a little ______ to the people from the north.

  • peculiar


Lead in

Ex. 4Fill in the blanks with the words or expressions given below. Change the form where necessary.

assume commit confuse hint mislead

peculiar puzzle qualify retreat vague

7.The failure of the movie hastened her decision to ______ from the glamorous screen and spend more time with her family.

  • retreat

8.The woman’s headache ______ the doctor; he couldn’t find the cause.

  • puzzled


Lead in

Ex. 4Fill in the blanks with the words or expressions given below. Change the form where necessary.

assume commit confuse hint mislead

peculiar puzzle qualify retreat vague

9.The state has laws that protect consumers against fraud or ______ sales practices.

  • misleading

10.He tried to explain the complicated theory to me, but I got more ______ by the technical terms in his explanation.

  • confused


Lead in

Ex. 5Complete the following sentences with phases or expressions given below. Change the form where necessary.

at a loss hang on jot down

rack one’s brains resort to

1.The local government’s decision to reduce unemployment benefit enraged people so much that they ______ violent protest.

  • resorted to

2.What’s the point of ______ for months over something that a good teacher could have explained in minutes?

  • racking your/one’s brains


Lead in

Ex. 5Complete the following sentences with phases or expressions given below. Change the form where necessary.

at a loss hang on jot down

rack one’s brains resort to

3.The boy admires his father and ______ his every word.

  • hangs on

4.The manager pulled the pencil and pad from his shirt pocket and ______ every word the customer said.

  • jotted down


Lead in

Ex. 5Complete the following sentences with phases or expressions given below. Change the form where necessary.

at a loss hang on jot down

rack one’s brains resort to

5.At present, the whole world seems to be ______ about how to cope with the economic globalization.

  • at a loss


Lead in

Ex. 6Translate the following sentences into English.

1.知道原理是一回事,但要付诸实践又是另外一回事。(it’s one thing … it’s another…)

understand the principle

put it into practice

It’s one thing to understand the principle, it’s another thing to put it into practice.


Lead in

Ex. 6Translate the following sentences into English.

2.据报道,慢跑(jogging)可将患心脏病的可能性减少三分之二。(less likely)

suffer from aheart attack

It is reported that

It is reported that jogging makes you three times less likely to suffer from a heart attack.


Lead in

Ex. 6Translate the following sentences into English.

3.根据最新调查,半数英国人不清楚欧元与英镑的比值。(have no idea / in relation to)

what the euro is worth in relation to the pound

according to the latest survey

Almost half of the British people have no idea what the euro is worth in relation to the pound, according to the latest survey.


Lead in

Ex. 6Translate the following sentences into English.

4. 这片土地本应建成一个供大家享用的公园,但现在却立起了几栋公寓楼。(should have done)

stand

for everyone to enjoy

The area should have been made into a park for everyone to enjoy but now some apartment buildings stand there.


Lead in

Ex. 6Translate the following sentences into English.

5.不知道所有这些相关信息能否凑成一幅关于他的清晰图画。(relate / add up to)

take a positive action to protect our environment

I’m wondering

I’m wondering whether all the related information could add up to a clear picture of him.


Lead in

Ex. 7Read the following sentences carefully, and then make your own sentences using the patterns in red.

1.It’s one thing to use a word, it’s anotherto explain it.

It’s one thing to__________, it’s another to _______________.

Reference:

It’s one thing totalk about reforms,it’s another tocarry them out for real.


Lead in

Ex. 7Read the following sentences carefully, and then make your own sentences using the patterns in red.

2.I went on talking, as if a thousand vague words would add up to one accurate definition.

______________, as if _________________________ add up to _____________________.

Reference:

He has studied at college for 7 years as if more degrees would add up to his success.


Lead in

Ex. 7Read the following sentences carefully, and then make your own sentences using the patterns in red.

3.I had no idea because the longer I thought about idioms the less sure I was what they were.

______ the longer ___________________ the less ___________________.

Reference:

She felt the longer she practiced piano the less skilled she became.


Lead in

Ex. 7Read the following sentences carefully, and then make your own sentences using the patterns in red.

4.I’d been so inspired by the driver’s determination to learn English that I didn’t fully grasp the potential for linguistic fraud committed in this man’s cab.

_______ so inspired by __________________________ that ______________.

Reference:

Young Einstein was so inspired by the magic force of the compass that he was determined to discover about the behavior of the universe.


Lead in

Ex. 7Read the following sentences carefully, and then make your own sentences using the patterns in red.

5.I can only trust that someone as curious as he is also owns a dictionary.

________________ someone as __________ as _____________________________.

Reference:

I assume someone as ambitious as he is will become somebody sooner or later.


  • Login