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WHY. Presentation Outline. Identify a selection of current issues facing health and physical educators AND society Offer an overview of advocacy Suggest an advocacy action plan Identify resources (included on CD). Why Should There Be a Health and Physical Education Program in the Schools?.

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Why

WHY


Presentation outline

Presentation Outline

  • Identify a selection of current issues facing health and physical educators AND society

  • Offer an overview of advocacy

  • Suggest an advocacy action plan

  • Identify resources (included on CD)


Why should there be a health and physical education program in the schools

Why Should There Be a Health and Physical Education Program in the Schools?


Should health and physical education be taught by qualified teachers

Should Health and Physical Education be taught by qualified teachers?


How does teaching health and physical education help students

How does teaching Health and Physical Education help students?


Why should a school board member care about a comprehensive health and physical education program

Why should a School Board member care about a comprehensive Health and Physical Education program?


Selected issues

Selected Issues

Obesity and Health Care Costs

Legislation and State Initiatives

No Child Left Behind


Obesity and health care costs

Obesity and Health Care Costs


Percentage of u s children and adolescents who were overweight

Percentage of U.S. Children and Adolescents Who Were Overweight*

Ages 12-19

5

4

Ages 6-11

* >95th percentile for BMI by age and sex based on 2000 CDC BMI-for-age growth charts

**Data are from 1963-65 for children 6-11 years of age and from 1966-70 for adolescents 12-17 years of age

Source: National Center for Health Statistics


Percentage of u s children and adolescents who were overweight1

Percentage of U.S. Children and Adolescents Who Were Overweight*

16

15

Ages 12-19

5

4

Ages 6-11

* >95th percentile for BMI by age and sex based on 2000 CDC BMI-for-age growth charts

**Data are from 1963-65 for children 6-11 years of age and from 1966-70 for adolescents 12-17 years of age

Source: National Center for Health Statistics


Economic costs

Economic Costs

  • US obesity-attributable medical expenditures in 2003:

    • $75 billion

    • Approximately 10% of total US medical expenditures

  • Percent financed by taxpayers through Medicare and Medicaid

    • Approximately 50%


Sedentary death syndrome

Sedentary Death Syndrome


Why

Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults between 1985 and 2002

Obesity: having a very high amount of body fat in relation to lean body mass, or Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or higher

Body Mass Index (BMI): a measure of an adult’s weight in relation to his or her height, specifically the adult’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of his or her height in meters

CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

Source: Mokdad A H, et al. JAMA 1999;282:16.

Source: Mokdad A H, et al. JAMA 2001;286:10.

Source: Mokdad A H, et al. JAMA 2003;289:1.


Why

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1991-2002

1991

1995

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

2002

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1985

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1985

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1986

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1986

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1987

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1987

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1988

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1988

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1989

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1989

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1990

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1990

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1991

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1991

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1992

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1992

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1993

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1993

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1994

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1994

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1995

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1995

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1996

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1996

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1997

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1997

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1998

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1998

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1999

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1999

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2000

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2000

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2001

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2001

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%


Why

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2002

(*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC


Is there a connection

Is there a connection?


Percentage of u s high school students who attended physical education classes daily 1991 2001

Percentage of U.S. High School Students Who Attended Physical Education Classes Daily, 1991 - 2001

Source: CDC, National Youth Risk Behavior Survey


Percentage of schools that require physical education by grade

60

52

51

51

51

50

50

40

40

32

Percent of schools

26

30

25

20

13

10

6

10

5

0

K

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

7th

8th

9th

10th

11th

12th

Percentage of Schools that Require Physical Education, by Grade

CDC, School Health Policies and Programs Study, 2000


Why

Trends in PE Legislation

  • States legislatures are addressing PE

  • States usually do not begin with policies that mandate PE

  • Many states begin with resolutions and recommendations

  • Many policies specifically address collaboration between state agencies and organizations


Here s the 411 on pe

Here’s the 411 on PE

It’s slamming, it’s dope, it’s sweet and it’s tight


G l o s s a r y

Glossary

Flossin’ – good looking

Peeps – people, friends

Down Low – Keep it quiet, secret

Keeping It Real - authentic

Fo Sho – for sure, absolutely

Fer Real – honest, for real

Off the Hook – crazy, weird, wild

Phat – awesome, great

Da Bomb – terrific, number one

Hooked Up – got together

411 – information

(http://www.urbandictionary.com/)


Why

Virginia (HB 235 – 3/26/99)

Clarifies the Standards of Quality so that the School Board must include PE among subjects emphasized in programs of instruction for K-12; requires school boards to employ only licensed instructional personnel.


Why

PE

Georgia (HB 1187 – 4/25/00)

Changes provisions regarding the course of study in PE – adds language stating that the Board of Ed shall establish minimum time requirements and standards for its administration.


Why

PEFer Real

Oregon (HB 3307 – 8/20/99)

Add PE to the core curriculum – “provides students with the knowledge, skills and positive attitude that lead to an active, healthy lifestyle;…school districts shall develop and administer assessments for PE to implemented by the 03-04 school year.”


Why

PE That’s

Louisiana (SB 398 – 7/1/03)

“Requires public schools serving grades K-6

to provide at least 30 minutes daily of quality physical education to their students. Effective 2004-2005 School year.


Why

PE

Texas (SB 19 – 5/27/01)

The State Board of Ed may require an elementary school student enrolled in K-6 to participate in dailyphysical activity as part of a school district’s physical education curriculum or through structured activity during a school campus’s daily recess.


Why

with PE

Connecticut (HB 5737 – 5/17/00) and Florida (HB 2105 – 4/25/00)

Requires high school students to have a minimum of one credit in PE to be eligible for graduation.


Why

PE

California HB-1793 – 9/27/02

Amends current ed code to put greater emphasis on PE. Requires State Board of Ed to adopt model PE curriculum content standards, encourages school districts to employ credentialed PE teachers and encourages teaching PE for a no less than 200 minutes each 10 school days.


Why

PE

California SB-1868 – 9/30/02

Further amends current ed code to adopt rules and regs to secure establishment of courses in PE in elementary and secondary schools.

Distribute PE manual to all teachers and encourage schools to provide quality PE that develops the knowledge, attitudes, skills…to be physically active for life.


Why

New Jersey - In a Class By Itself

Health, Safety, and Physical Education Mandate

18A:35-7. Course requiredEvery pupil, except kindergarten pupils, attending the public schools, insofar as he is physically fit and capable of doing so, as determined by the medical inspector, shall take such courses, which shall be a part of the curriculum prescribed for the several grades, and the conduct and attainment of the pupils shall be marked as in other courses or subjects, and the standing of the pupil in connection therewith shall form a part of the requirements for promotion or graduation.


Why

New Jersey - In a Class By Itself

Health, Safety, and Physical Education Mandate

18A:35-8. Time devoted to courseThe time devoted to such courses shall aggregate at least two and one-half hours in each school week, or proportionately less when holidays fall within the week.

  • New Jersey Set a Standard, Should Be Proud of It AND Should NOT Retreat From It!


Why

  • Fleetwood Elementary School, Mt. Laurel, NJ

    • Carol Lynch, Physical Education teacher

STARS is NASPE's national achievement program recognizing outstanding physical education programs in K-12 schools across America.


Why

The flossin’ peeps need their PE -- don’t keep it on the down low!


No child left behind

No Child Left Behind

  • Federal Legislation with a Local Impact

  • Health and Physical Education are not part of it.

  • Accountability is a central theme - hold us accountable

  • Qualified teacher - we have them!


Time in the arts physical education and school achievement

Time in the arts, physical educationand school achievement

  • 547 elementary school principals in Virginia responded to survey

  • Time allocated for art, music and physical education with a specialist?

  • Correlated with test scores from their schools

  • No meaningful relationship found

  • Results suggest that providing time for AMPE does not negatively impact test scores

  • Wilkins, J..M., Graham, G., Parker, S., Westfall, S. Fraser, R. & Tembo, M. (2003).

  • Time in the arts and physical education and school achievement. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 35, 721-734.


The relationship between fitness levels and academic achievement in california grade 7

The Relationship Between Fitness Levels and Academic Achievement, in California Grade 7


Which begs the question

Which begs the question…

What might the statistics look like if kids in the U.S. had positive, daily physical education for 12 years of school?


Advocacy

Advocacy

What is it

and

how can we be a player?


Spheres of influence

Spheres of Influence


A cast of thousands

A Cast of Thousands

Governor

Legislature

State board of education

Chief state school officer

State level

State education agency staff

Local government

School board

School district level

Superintendent

Central office staff

School improvement council

School level

Principal

School staff


Cardinal rules of advocacy

Cardinal Rules of Advocacy

  • All politics is local or why no one can explain a bill like a constituent.

  • Prince Machiavelli Rule – Don’t burn a bridge that you may need to cross again.

  • Capone Rule – You get more done with kind words and a gun than with kind words alone.


Cardinal rules of advocacy1

Cardinal Rules of Advocacy

  • Animal Farm Rule– All legislators are equal; it’s just that some are more equal than others.

  • Ronald Reagan Rule – Why a good story always beats the facts.

  • Norman Schwarzkopf Rule – Make your friends your heroes and they will fight for you like heroes. Or, why no one ever got mad at being thanked too many times or too many ways. (also known as the Winnie the Pooh Rule)


Potential barriers

Potential Barriers

  • Preoccupation with education reform pressures

  • School funding pressures

  • Disputes about schools’ role in social and health issues

  • Lack of widespread public concern about the issue


Persistence pays

Persistence Pays

  • Respect the hierarchy

  • Stay focused on the ultimate goal

  • Don’t expect quick or easy success

  • Sustain the effort

  • Be willing to compromise…but know your bottom line

  • Don’t burn your bridges

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that ever has.” - Margaret Meade


Making an action plan

Making an Action Plan


Why

Your Reality Show

As a member of this team, what is your strength and what can you offer the group in their effort to accomplish the task.


What can you do

Are you a good speaker?

Can you write accurate and convincing statements for the speaker?

Who do you know who can speak about the benefits of your program?

Who can quickly develop a plan?

What resources are available and do you know how to access them?

Who do you know on the Board?

What Can YOU Do?


What can you do1

Who can keep a positive attitude and motivate the team?

Is there a strong passion among the team about what they do to energize the group to do whatever is necessary?

Are you the only one with a passion for what you do? and is the program you represent worth saving?

What Can YOU Do?


Can you say yes

Can you say Yes!

1.Written or submitted an article about your program for the school or local newspaper?

2.Served on a school or local committee to represent your discipline or program?

3.Prepared a fact sheet about your program for distribution to parents, administrators, the community or other decision-makers?


Can you say yes1

Can you say Yes!

4.Invited community members or parents with expertise in a program area to share their knowledge and skills with your classes or population?

5.Organized a special event to promote your program? Events such as a “family fitness night”, a dance performance, a community hike, bike or swim day, or a sports clinic?


Can you say yes2

Can you say Yes!

6.Contacted the New Jersey Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance or any other organization to ask how you can become involved?


Can you say yes3

Can you say Yes!

7.Communicated with a local or state government leader about your program and discipline?

8.Stayed personally active,yes – worked out, actively used your leisure time, on a regular basis?

9.Improved your knowledge and skills required for your program - activities such as reading professional articles, writing curriculum, attending classes, leading discussion groups or learning a new skill?


Can you say yes4

Can you say Yes!

10.Reflected on your program and then planned and implemented changes to make it more effective?


Scoring rubric

Scoring Rubric

If you responded yes to:

All 10

You are a super advocate.

Your passion is sizzling!


Scoring rubric1

Scoring Rubric

Between 7 and 9 You have done a great job and are ready to set new goals. Your passion is hot but can be kicked up a notch.


Scoring rubric2

Scoring Rubric

Between 4 and 6

You are coasting and could be challenged at anytime.

Your passion is lukewarm and needs to be fired up.


Scoring rubric3

Scoring Rubric

Between 0 and 3

You are lucky, or no one knows you exist and you are an easy target for elimination. Your passion is close to non-existent. Is there any passion????


You never know

You Never Know

Talking with

your neighbor

That moment in line - shoveling snow is exercise

Counseling during a

job interview


Developing an action plan

Developing an Action Plan


Action plan

Action Plan

  • First, identify your desired outcome.


Action plan1

Action Plan

  • Second, consider why this issue or concern should be addressed.


Action plan2

Action Plan

  • Third, who do you want to influence?


Action plan3

Action Plan

  • Fourth, the strategies you will use to communicate and accomplish your goal.


Strategies

Strategies

  • Billboard

  • Fiscal Responsibility

  • Educational Experience

  • Technology Strategy

  • Let’s Get Obvious


Action plan4

Action Plan

  • The fifth component of the action plan requires that you develop a concise message?

A

I

H

W

A

I


Action plan5

Action Plan

  • Number six, you need a network.


Action plan6

Action Plan

  • Creative

  • Feasible

  • Individual Strengths

  • Group Strengths

  • Time, effort and commitment

  • Acknowledge others


Whatever it takes

Whatever It Takes

3 Words - Your Strengths

3 Things - You’re Passionate About

Your Plan - A Beginning


Make it happen

Make It Happen

“A dream without a plan is only a wish;

a vision without action is only an illusion..”

~ Willie White


Supplemental information

Supplemental Information


Typical questions you may be asked

Typical QuestionsYou May be Asked

  • How much physical activity do children and adolescents need?

  • What is the most important thing that schools can do to increase physical activity among children and adolescents?

  • What are the biggest barriers for schools to provide quality physical education to all students?

  • Can’t physical education be provided as part of recess?

  • Why do schools have to take responsibility for the physical activity of students?


Physical education s role in the obesity epidemic

Physical Education’s Role in the Obesity Epidemic

  • Physical inactivity is part of the problem

  • Physical activity is part of the solution

  • Physical education is a critical to increasing physical activity

    • School physical education programs are the one place that:

      • All children can participate in regular physical activity

      • All children can become physically educated for a lifetime of physical activity


National call to action increase physical activity among youth

National Call to Action: Increase Physical Activity Among Youth

  • Healthy People 2010 (2000)

  • Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2000)

  • Promoting Better Health for Young People Through Physical Activity and Sports: A Report to the President from the Secretary of Health and Human Services and Secretary of Education (2000)

  • The Surgeon General’s Call to Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity (2001)

  • Guide to Community Preventive Services (2001)


The brain body connection

The Brain/Body Connection

  • Research has not been conducted to conclusively demonstrate a link between physical activity and improved academic performance

  • However, such a link might be expected

  • Research does show that:

    • Movement stimulates brain functioning

    • Physical activity increases adolescents’ self-esteem and reduces anxiety and stress…thus, through it’s effects on mental health, may help increase students’ capacity for learning

    • Increases in time for physical education did not lead to lower test scores


Useful resources school health starter kit

Useful Resources:School Health Starter Kit

From:

The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and

The Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO)

www.ccsso.org/ starterkit.html


Making the connection health and student achievement

Making the Connection: Health and Student Achievement

  • Association of State and Territorial Health Officials www.astho.org

  • Society of State Directors of Physical Education and Health www.thesociety.org


Fit healthy and ready to learn a school health policy guide

Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn: A School Health Policy Guide

  • Guide to policymaking

  • Sample policies - download at www.nasbe.org/healthyschools/fithealthy.mgi

  • Full explanations

  • Research findings

  • Notable quotes

  • Excerpts of actual policies

  • Resource lists


Resources

Resources

AAHPERD Advocacy

NASPE Information

PE Central

PE Links 4 U

PE4Life

CDC Youth/Physical Activity

National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity

Action for Healthy Kids

President’s Council

New Jersey Department of Education


Why

Resources

  • Thomas (information on bills in Congress)

  • National Conference of State Legislatures (information on bills in states)

  • National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity (policy options)

  • National Association of State Boards of Education “Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn”


Why

Resources

  • CDC Division of Adolescent and School Health:

    • School Health Index

    • School Health Policies and Programs Study state report cards

    • Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System

  • US Department of Agriculture “Changing the Scene”

  • US Department of Education PEP Program


Presentation resources

Presentation Resources

Karen Silberman - Executive Director, NCPPA

George Graham - President, NASPE

Suzanne Smith - Advocacy Consultant, AHA

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC

Bill Potts-Datema - Director, Partnerships for Children’s Health, Harvard School of Public Health


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