Persuasive writing
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 48

Persuasive Writing PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 75 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Persuasive Writing. Proposal and Planning. Topic Choice: Freewriting – everything you know or think you might know!. Topic Choice. Sources. R ead your article/listen to your source. Highlight/note down all of the key points F or each of your sources, note down the following: Purpose

Download Presentation

Persuasive Writing

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Persuasive writing

Persuasive Writing

Proposal and Planning


Topic choice freewriting everything you know or think you might know

Topic Choice: Freewriting – everything you know or think you might know!

Topic Choice


Sources

Sources

  • Read your article/listen to your source.

  • Highlight/note down all of the key points

  • For each of your sources, note down the following:

    • Purpose

    • Writer’s Attitude

    • Reliability

    • Key Points (in your own words)

    • Useful quotations


Once i have chosen my issue how do i write my persuasive essay on it

Once I have chosen my issue how do I write my persuasive essay on it? 

  • You prepare notes by following these steps:


Step 1 decide your point of view on the issue

STEP 1– Decide your point of view on the issue  –


Step 1 decide your point of view on the issue1

STEP 1 - Decide your point of view on the issue 

  • Let us say that in your persuasive essay you intend to persuade the reader that the tax on tobacco should be increased so that the demand for cigarettes will be reduced. 

  • You start the note preparation with the simple statement:

  • ‘I think that the tax on tobacco should be increased.’

  • All points made in the essay are written to convince the reader of this view.


Step 2 create points that support your point of view

STEP 2 - Create points that support your point of view -


Step 2 create points that support your point of view1

STEP 2 - Create points that support your point of view

  • You now produce a list of points, in any order,FORthe tax on tobacco being increased.

  • Here, we have produced a list of five points, although we could have listed more.


Step 3 you now have to choose the points you are going to develop

STEP 3 - You now have to choose the points you are going to develop -


Step 3 you now have to choose the points you are going to develop1

STEP 3 - You now have to choose the points you are going to develop

  • In most cases, to present a convincing argument for your point of view, it is sufficient to select three persuasive points.

  • However many you choose to develop, the points you select form the basis of your essay.

  • In the table that follows we have selected the three points (*) that we will develop in the essay.


Deciding the order of your points

Deciding the order of your points

  • You now have to decide the order in which the points will be used in the essay.

  • This exemplar takes the approach that you can lead up to your most convincing point, but there are others.

  • It is suggested you decide from your list what your most convincing point is and number it "1".


Exemplar

Exemplar

  • In the essay on increasing the tax on tobacco, our three points are prioritised like this:


Step 4 show that you aware of opposing arguments

STEP 4 - Show that you aware of opposing arguments -


Step 4 show that you aware of opposing arguments1

STEP 4 - Show that you aware of opposing arguments 

  • You will impress the marker by showing that you understand both sides of the issue and that you can argue against objections to your point of view. This will strengthen your persuasive essay.

  • You make a list of two or three points which oppose yours and introduce these points in your essay explaining why you do not find them convincing. 


Example of two opposing points on the smoking issue

Example of two opposing points on the smoking issue:

→  you do not need to prioritise opposing arguments


Final point

Final Point

  • If you have followed STEP 1 to STEP 4 you are ready to find Evidenceto support the points you have chosen to develop.


Homework

Homework

  • Monday –

  • Three sources and your notes on - purpose, attitude, reliability, key points, useful quotations

  • Hand in a brief proposal outlining three arguments you will make

  • Two counter arguments


Creating a catchy title

Creating a Catchy Title


Creating a title

Creating a Title

  • The title of your persuasive essay will be the first words the marker reads. Your title sends a strong signal to the marker about the quality of your essay.

  • A title can:

  • • create immediate impact • show your intelligence • give information

  • • make the reader think • provoke emotion - anger, shock, disgust

  • • be humorous • convey your opinion • make your issue clear

    or provide a combination of these.

  • • Common language techniques which gain the reader's attention are: 

  • • alliteration • questions • puns • rhyme • odd spelling • repetition

  • • emotive language • command • creative punctuation • unusual use of

    words


Examples

Examples:

  • →  many modern autobiographies have titles using these techniques

  • Examples of language techniques creating effective titles in persuasive essays:


Persuasive writing

Structuring a Persuasive Essay


Important ingredients in your essay

Important Ingredients in Your Essay

  • Get Attention - Introduction

  • Establish the Need – The Arguments that change is needed

  • Satisfy the Need – The Arguments about what the change should be

  • Visualise the Future – How/Why the change will improve the situation

  • Call for Action – What you want your audience/reader to do


Get attention

Get Attention

  • One way is to start with something shocking, startling or controversial. Even humour will work fine, depending on the topic.

    Examples:

  • Surprising fact:  Did you know that you can get your brain to work smarter by eating blueberries?

  • Anecdote:I was driving home the other day, when I saw a tiny dog by the roadside. She was thin and emaciated and shivering. I instantly decided to find it a home. I pulled over and picked it up – and it turned out that the only home I ever want the dog to have is mine. That small dog has changed my life completely.

  • Question:  When was the last time you educated your employees on safety? 

  • Relevantto the topic:  If your topic is genetically modified foods, you can say something like “Grocery stores are filled with genetically modified foods.  The food you have eaten this morning may very well have been genetically modified.


Establish the need

Establish the Need

  • This is where the audience needs to be convinced that there is a problem. You should encourage the audience to feel a need or want – and that things need to change.

    This is accomplished through:

  • A definite statement of what the need or want/problem is.

  • Give examples illustrating the problem. Paint verbal pictures to really get the audience to feel the problem.

  • Back up with statistics, examples or testimonies.

  • Explain the consequences of not changing and show the audience how this is directly related and important to them.

    Example:

  • All across Britain, every school day, teenagers are going into their educational establishments armed with a knife. Parents, teachers and frightened pupils are crying out for action to deal with this problem.


Satisfy the need

Satisfy the Need

  • What are different groups arguing is the solution to the problem?

  • The audience needs to be told, very directly and clearly, what it is that needs to be done.

  • Explain the solution to the problem and how it will deal with the issue.

  • Reveal evidence supporting the solution.

  • Anticipate counter-arguments and respond by illustrating why the counter-argument should not be a concern.

    Example:

  • Politicians are now arguing that a police presence within every school with a history of knife crime is needed. Statistics from the Home Office show that the visibility and speedy response provided by this measure cuts the number of serious incidents by around 75%. Although unpopular with some, this is undoubtedly the way forward.


Visualise the future

Visualise the Future

  • Present possible future scenarios:

    Positive: Show how much better the situation will be as a result of going with the solution offered.

    Negative: Make the audience understand how bad life would be as a result of not going with this solution.

    Flag up the Contrast

    Example: If the 75% reduction in serious knife crime was replicated across all of Britain’s schools then incidents such as the tragic stabbing of Ann Maguire would be a very rare news story rather than a depressingly inevitable escalation of the current state of schools in our society today.


Call for action

Call for Action

  • This is the final call for the audience to take the solution offered. Make it short, powerful and well worded.

    Example:

  • The debate has been lost by those who cannot stomach the thought of police in schools, since sadly the figures speak for themselves. We need to immediately put in place these measures, a policeman in every ‘at risk’ school at the very least, and return to a society where disputes in schools between pupils are settled without the need for deadly weaponry.


Introductions

Introductions

  • Having worked through the introductions tasks and having looked at examples you should have an idea what a good introduction should include.

  • There is no right or wrong answer but you should hope to:

    • Make the topic relevant/current

    • Grab the attention with a shocking statement/fact/statistic

    • Explain briefly the topic

    • Establish who is on the two sides of the debate

    • What you are arguing for

  • Your challenge is to take the ingredients and present it stylishly.


Independence not indifference

Independence Not Indifference

  • With the Scottish Independence referendum rapidly approaching, it is time for Scots to decide to vote 'Yes' for the benefit of not only themselves but their country. For hundreds of years the British government has taken gradual steps towards becoming a democracy through Reform Acts and redistribution of parliamentary seats as well as the extension of the franchise to all adult men and women living in the UK. Although there has been tremendous progress from the initial situation, Britain remains undemocratic. The historic 'House of Lords' remains an active constitution within parliament, and with their membership being unelected, their influences on government must be considered undemocratic. When Scotland has the chance to escape the grasp of the undemocratic British government, it must do so.


Independence not indifference1

Play on words. Stance is clear.

Independence Not Indifference

  • With the Scottish Independence referendum rapidly approaching, it is time for Scots to decide to vote 'Yes' for the benefit of not only themselves but their country. For hundreds of years the British government has taken gradual steps towards becoming a democracy through Reform Acts and redistribution of parliamentary seats as well as the extension of the franchise to all adult men and women living in the UK. Although there has been tremendous progress from the initial situation, Britain remains undemocratic. The historic 'House of Lords' remains an active constitution within parliament, and with their membership being unelected, their influences on government must be considered undemocratic. When Scotland has the chance to escape the grasp of the undemocratic British government, it must do so.


I spy with my little eye something beginning with you

I Spy With My Little Eye Something Beginning With…You

  • You are being watched. At any given time your private life can be observed, without your knowledge, by any manner of surveillance methods. Imagine a fairly banal scenario: you send a text to let your significant other know you will be late home. What you don’t know though is that this benign text contained three PRISM-flagged terms, and has now been shared with a department of analysts working for a government of a foreign power. However you feel personally about the interaction between civil liberties and national security, it is an irrefutable truth that such widespread snooping on law-abiding citizens is not the way to do it. Consider the moral implications of an entire society constantly observed by a handful of secretive agencies that are accountable to no-one. If that doesn’t get you up in arms, then perhaps the idea of billions of pounds being poured down the drain so that GCHQ can read your emails will stir some resentment. To top it all off, it has been proven time and time again that mass surveillance doesn’t actually help the police to stop the crimes that supposedly justify its use.


I spy with my little eye something beginning with you1

I Spy With My Little Eye Something Beginning With…You

  • You are being watched. At any given time your private life can be observed, without your knowledge, by any manner of surveillance methods. Imagine a fairly banal scenario: you send a text to let your significant other know you will be late home. What you don’t know though is that this benign text contained three PRISM-flagged terms, and has now been shared with a department of analysts working for a government of a foreign power. However you feel personally about the interaction between civil liberties and national security, it is an irrefutable truth that such widespread snooping on law-abiding citizens is not the way to do it. Consider the moral implications of an entire society constantly observed by a handful of secretive agencies that are accountable to no-one. If that doesn’t get you up in arms, then perhaps the idea of billions of pounds being poured down the drain so that GCHQ can read your emails will stir some resentment. To top it all off, it has been proven time and time again that mass surveillance doesn’t actually help the police to stop the crimes that supposedly justify its use.


The parts

The Parts

  • Persuasive Language

  • Linking Words/Phrases

  • Evidence

    • Statistics/Facts

    • Respected Opinions

    • Anecdotal Evidence

  • Arguments

  • Course of Action

  • Counter Arguments

  • Summary Statements


Argument paragraphs

Argument Paragraphs

  • There is no set way to lay out a paragraph but in each:

    • It should be clear what the argument is

    • There should be evidence to support the argument

  • You might find the following possible structures helpful – your essay could end up being a mixture of these three possible frameworks


Structure 1 s w e e t

Structure 1 - SWEET

  • State the argument

  • Widen the reader/audience’s understanding of the argument

  • Evidence in support of the argument

  • Evaluate the argument/Explore the counter-argument

  • Take it forward/Take it down


S w e e t example from pro better together essay

SWEET – Example from pro – Better Together essay

The ‘Better Together’ campaign argue that if Scotland becomes an independent country we will not be able to afford to maintain the same level of public spending without raising taxes. This would mean that either Scotland would be forced to make cuts to services such as Health, Education and Welfare or they would need to raise taxes. They cite the fact that a report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) believe Scotland would face an immediate “fiscal gap” where what the National Income is would fall short of what Scotland needs to spend to maintain the current level of public services. This is a very convincing argument, the very fact the report is by an independent body is significant and lands a telling blow on Salmond’s faltering campaign for independence. ‘Better Together’ should make crystal clear to the voters that by voting ‘Yes’ they need to prepared to accept further cuts in public spending or submit to paying higher taxes.


S w e e t example from pro better together essay explore counter point taken down

SWEET – Example from pro – Better Together essay – Explore Counter Point, Taken Down

The ‘Better Together’ campaign argue that if Scotland becomes an independent country we will not be able to afford to maintain the same level of public spending without raising taxes. This would mean that either Scotland would be forced to make cuts to services such as Health, Education and Welfare or they would need to raise taxes. They cite the fact that a report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) believe Scotland would face an immediate “fiscal gap” where what the National Income is would fall short of what Scotland needs to spend to maintain the current level of public services. The ‘Yes’ campaign maintain that these figures don’t take into account what will happen when the UK’s overall debt is split up, as this will reduce Scotland’s interest burden. But the flaw in this argument is that these figures are based solely on what Scotland spends and what it earns, the legacy debt is not relevant. Scotland simply doesn’t produce enough revenue to continue to offer the same level of public services that they can as part of a strong UK economy.


Structure 2 s w e a t

Structure 2 - SWEAT

  • State the argument

  • Widen the reader/audience’s understanding of the argument

  • Evidence in support of the argument

  • Action the audience needs to take

  • The future if they do


S w e a t example from pro better together essay

SWEAT – Example from pro – Better Together essay

The ‘Better Together’ campaign argue that if Scotland becomes an independent country we will not be able to afford to maintain the same level of public spending without raising taxes. This would mean that either Scotland would be forced to make cuts to services such as Health, Education and Welfare or they would need to raise taxes. They cite the fact that a report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) believe Scotland would face an immediate “fiscal gap” where what the National Income is would fall short of what Scotland needs to spend to maintain the current level of public services. Every man, woman, and child (they’re letting sixteen year olds vote in the referendum) must now, unless they wish to see the public services in Scotland wither and die or they wish to see the economy crippled by high taxes, make it their mission to convince every ‘Yes’ or ‘Undecided’ voter that they must vote ‘No’. Only then can we look forward to the economic prosperity that a strong UK government, growing UK economy and united UK people can provide.


Structure 3 s w e e p

Structure 3 - SWEEP

  • You can use this to explore an argument that you don’t agree with but which you feel needs to be addressed and dismissed

  • State the argument

  • Widen the reader/audience’s understanding of the argument

  • Evidence in support of the argument

  • Evaluate the evidence/argument

  • Push it away


S w e e p example from pro independence essay

SWEEP – Example from pro – Independence essay

The ‘Better Together’ campaign argue that if Scotland becomes an independent country we will not be able to afford to maintain the same level of public spending without raising taxes. This would mean that either Scotland would be forced to make cuts to services such as Health, Education and Welfare or they would need to raise taxes. They cite the fact that a report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) believe Scotland would face an immediate “fiscal gap” where what the National Income is would fall short of what Scotland needs to spend to maintain the current level of public services. All very convincing until you look at the figures that the IFS are using to formulate this argument. Their report is entirely based upon the most pessimistic forecasts available in terms of oil-production. If these figures were to come to fruition, regardless of the result of the referendum, the country would be in trouble, whether it is the united UK or an independent Scotland. Simply basing our figures on more realistic figures rather than ‘worst case scenario’ projections leads to a more likely surplus in revenue; leaving us room to invest in public services and leave taxes well alone. It’s time to dismiss the doom-mongers and embrace the possible positives of an independent Scotland.


Planning

Planning

  • At least 3 arguments you are going to make to support your point of view.

  • Supporting detail for each argument

  • What evidence you are going to use for each argument

  • At least 1 counter argument.

  • Summarise it

  • Say how you are going to undermine it


Persuasive writing

How do you make an

effective point?

Introduce it.

Explain it.

Justify it.

Drive it home.


Persuasive writing

Introduce Your Point.

Note the use of direct address.

Use a clear statement

You can afford to be general, rather than specific at this stage.

I’m sure you all agree that supermarkets need to start taking responsibility for the environment, and stop over packaging goods.


Persuasive writing

Explain Your Point.

Note the use of direct address (inclusive pronouns), power of three, ‘say again’ and emotive language.

Restate your point in more detail.

Be more specific.

This is the ‘in other words’ stage of your point.

Recycling and the conservation of our planet’s natural resources is a key concern to many responsible citizens, yet the supermarkets ignore this. They need to stop wrapping goods in multiple layers of unnecessary polythene, plastic and card board.

writing


Persuasive writing

Justify Your Point.

Give reasons.

Remind people how they might behave in similar situations.

Provide evidence.

Make a moral argument.

Show that alternatives are worse (undermine the opposition).


Persuasive writing

What ?

Statistics

Facts

Witness testimony

Expert opinion

A quotation

An example (an anecdote)

Logic

writing


  • Login