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FEMA :. The Role It Plays in Coastal Management. FEMA’s Mission Statement.

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Fema

FEMA:

The Role It Plays in

Coastal Management


Fema s mission statement

FEMA’s Mission Statement

To reduce loss of life and property and protect our nation's critical infrastructure from all types of hazards through a comprehensive, risk-based, emergency management program of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.


The origination of fema

The Origination of FEMA

  • The Congressional Act of 1803 grants financial assistance to a New Hampshire town coping with extensive fire damage. Over the century, more than 100 times will aid be granted to other areas where nature wreaked havoc.

  • During the 1930s, government grants several federal agencies the capability to provide aid to areas damaged by natural disaster.

  • The Disaster Relief Act of 1974 strengthens the process of Presidential Disaster Declaration.

  • In 1979, President Carter combines the disaster relief responsibilities of several agencies into one- FEMA.


Defining disaster

Defining Disaster

As defined by FEMA, a disaster can strike anytime, anywhere. It takes many forms -- a hurricane, an earthquake, a tornado, a flood, a fire or a hazardous spill, an act of nature or an act of terrorism. It builds over days or weeks, or hits suddenly, without warning.


Fema and the coast

FEMA and the Coast

FEMA attempts to protect coastal residents and visitors by bringing together several federal agencies for the purpose of aiding and, if necessary, evacuating stranded people (and animals), assessing storm damage and providing financial assistance, educating the public about living with coastal hazards, cleaning up in the aftermath of a natural disaster, and studying coastal erosion rates.


Aiding stranded residents

Aiding Stranded Residents


Aiding stranded residents1

Aiding Stranded Residents


Evacuating stranded residents

Evacuating Stranded Residents


Evacuating stranded residents1

Evacuating Stranded Residents


Assessing storm damage

Assessing Storm Damage


Educating the public

Educating the Public

Project Impact Hurricane Expo 2001, sponsored in part by FEMA, was held at Trask Coliseum this past June. The expo focused on preparing for, and mitigating damage from storm-related flooding and other natural disasters.


Educating the public coastal construction

Educating the Public: Coastal Construction

  • FEMA offers an independent study course in Residential Coastal Construction, which covers the historical perspective, coastal environment, investigating regulatory requirements, identifying hazards, siting, and financial and insurance implications. The course is targeted towards engineers, architects, and building code officials.


Making reparations in the aftermath

Making Reparations in the Aftermath


Coastal erosion

Coastal Erosion

  • Summer 1996: Hurricane Fran makes landfall in North Carolina. The massive storm is believed to have blanketed Brunswick, Pender, New Hanover, Onslow, and Carteret counties, subjected the land area to maximum sustained winds estimated at 100 knots. Kure Beach loses as much as 40 feet of sand in some locations. At Figure Eight Island and Topsail Beach, tons of sand is picked up and transported to the islands’ soundside.


Coastal erosion1

Coastal Erosion

  • 3 June 1998: FEMA donates $211,395 towards a project aimed at more accurately calculating erosion rates along the North Carolina coast as a result of Hurricane Fran. FEMA’s contribution comes from its Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, whose purpose is to decrease the risk of human and property loss in natural disasters.


Works cited

Works Cited

  • WWW.FEMA.GOV

  • WWW.NHCGOV.COM


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