Social identity theory
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Social Identity Theory. In the Social Identity Theory, a person has not one, “personal self”, but rather several selves that correspond to widening circles of group membership. An individual has multiple “social identities”. Henri Tajfel.

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Social Identity Theory

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Social identity theory

Social Identity Theory


Social identity theory

  • In the Social Identity Theory, a person has not one, “personal self”, but rather several selves that correspond to widening circles of group membership.


Social identity theory

  • An individual has multiple “social identities”


Henri tajfel

Henri Tajfel

  • For more details on Tajfel’s life visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Tajfel


Social identity theory1

SOCIAL IDENTITY THEORY

  • This theory is all about becoming part of different groups, and how membership to these groups helps construct our identities.

  • They suggested that people have an inbuilt tendency to categorise themselves into one or more in-groups, building a part of their identity on the basis of membership of that group and enforcing boundaries with other groups.


The three elements

THE THREE ELEMENTS

  • Tafjel and Turner decided that Social Identity can be considered in four ways; for our studies we will look at three:

  • Categorisation

  • Identification

  • Comparison


Categorisation

CATEGORISATION

  • This looks at the way in which people put others (and ourselves) into categories. We label one another based on interest, ethnicity, gender, occupation and other factors.

  • Calling someone a Muslim, footballer, student, emo, mother, for example, are ways in which we do this.

  • IMPORTANT – this is not always negative and is different to stereotyping.


Identification

IDENTIFICATION

  • Once a social identity has been identified, people will choose to associate with certain groups.

  • Your collective identity becomes your in-group. This could be you family, a friendship group – even your class. This closeness functions to boost our self esteem and to create a sense of belonging.

  • A group or individual that poses as a threat to your in-group is called the out-group. Examples of this would be an outside family member, a new member to class, someone from a different ethnic background, or more close to home, somebody from the other side of the social area!


Comparison

COMPARISON

  • People compare themselves and their groups with other groups, seeing a favourable bias towards the group in which they belong.

  • Nowadays we see younger people dividing themselves into social groups or subcultures based on clothing, the music they listen to or other interests. Examples of this are emos, goths and hoodies.


Would people discriminate against others on the basis of their

Would people discriminate against others on the basis of their:

  • nationality?


Would people discriminate against others on the basis of their1

Would people discriminate against others on the basis of their:

  • nationality?

  • football team?


Would people discriminate against others on the basis of their2

Would people discriminate against others on the basis of their:

  • nationality?

  • football team?

  • eye colour?


Would people discriminate against others on the basis of their3

Would people discriminate against others on the basis of their:

  • nationality?

  • football team?

  • eye colour?

  • whether or not they liked a painting?


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