Transmission
Download
1 / 11

Transmission - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 100 Views
  • Uploaded on

Transmission. Larry Flowers AWEA. Wind Power in Queues (MW). Washington 5,831. VT 155. Montana 2,327. Maine 1,398. North Dakota 11,493. Minnesota 20,011. NH 396. Oregon 9,361. South Dakota 30,112. Wisconsin 908. Idaho 446. New York 8,000. MA 492. Wyoming

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Transmission' - bryony


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Transmission

Transmission

Larry Flowers

AWEA


Wind power in queues mw
Wind Power in Queues (MW)

Washington

5,831

VT

155

Montana

2,327

Maine

1,398

North

Dakota

11,493

Minnesota

20,011

NH

396

Oregon

9,361

South

Dakota

30,112

Wisconsin

908

Idaho

446

New York

8,000

MA

492

Wyoming

7,870

Michigan

2,518

RI

347

Iowa

14,569

Penn.

3,391

Nevada

3,913

Nebraska

3,726

NJ

1416

IN

8,426

Ohio

3,683

Illinois

16,284

Utah

1,052

WV

1,045

DE

450

Colorado

16,602

Kansas

13,191

VA

820

California

18,629

MD

810

Missouri

2,050

Oklahoma

14,677

Arizona

7,268

Under 1000 MW

1,000 MW-8,000 MW

Over 8,000 MW

New Mexico

14,136

Arkansas

210

Texas

63,504

Total 311,155 MW

Source: AWEA

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future


Lots of wind lots of load lots of distance
Lots of wind, Lots of load, Lots of distance

Best Onshore Wind Resources

Highest Load



RPS Policies

www.dsireusa.org / May 2011

ME: 30% x 2000

New RE: 10% x 2017

VT: (1) RE meets any increase in retail sales x 2012; (2) 20% RE & CHP x 2017

WA: 15% x 2020*

MN: 25% x 2025

(Xcel: 30% x 2020)

MT: 15% x 2015

NH: 23.8% x 2025

MA: 22.1% x 2020 New RE: 15% x 2020(+1% annually thereafter)

MI: 10% & 1,100 MW x 2015*

ND: 10% x 2015

OR: 25% x 2025(large utilities)*

5% - 10% x 2025 (smaller utilities)

SD: 10% x 2015

WI: Varies by utility; 10% x 2015 statewide

RI: 16% x 2020

NY: 29% x 2015

CT: 23% x 2020

NV: 25% x 2025*

IA: 105 MW

OH: 25% x 2025†

PA: ~18% x 2021†

CO: 30% by 2020(IOUs)

10% by 2020 (co-ops & large munis)*

IL: 25% x 2025

WV: 25% x 2025*†

NJ: 20.38% RE x 2021

+ 5,316 GWh solar x 2026

CA: 33% x 2020

KS: 20% x 2020

UT: 20% by 2025*

VA: 15% x 2025*

MO: 15% x 2021

MD: 20% x 2022

AZ: 15% x 2025

OK: 15% x 2015

DE: 25% x 2026*

NC: 12.5% x 2021(IOUs)

10% x 2018 (co-ops & munis)

NM: 20% x 2020(IOUs)

10% x 2020 (co-ops)

DC

DC: 20% x 2020

PR: 20% x 2035

TX: 5,880 MW x 2015

HI: 40% x 2030

29 states + DC and PR have an RPS

(7 states have goals)

Renewable portfolio standard

Minimum solar or customer-sited requirement

*

Renewable portfolio goal

Extra credit for solar or customer-sited renewables

Solar water heating eligible

Includes non-renewable alternative resources




Transmission acceptance
Transmission Acceptance

  • “If you like wind, you have to at least accept transmission” (paraphrase from Xcel COO)

  • Transmission is < 10% of electricity system cost

  • Relatively small amount of transmission has been built in last decade in US

  • Historically, economics and utility eminent domain ruled the day

  • 20% Wind: 12,000-19,000 miles of new HV transmission required

  • Distributed (community) wind will not substantially reduce need for significant transmission build out

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future


Transmission acceptance cont d
Transmission Acceptance (cont’d)

  • U.S. is heavily engaged in regional transmission route options analysis & planning (e.g., EWITS, WECC, WGA, RMATS, SPP, ERCOT)

  • Identification of Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZ) at the state and regional level helps focus the analyses

  • Federal lands corridors identified but not thoroughly vetted with stakeholders

  • Several states and their utilities are active in stakeholder and community engagement (e.g., TX, CA, MN, MT)

  • Some innovative approaches being taken to secure stakeholder involvement and acceptance (e.g., MATL, CA RETI, HART, CAPEX 2020); traditional stakeholder processes ineffective

  • Basic approach: convince stakeholders that transmission is both needed (e.g. to meet state RPS) and transcends utility interests

  • More local, more difficult

  • Multi-state cooperation is critical, but politically difficult

  • Economic development potentials creating inter-regional stress

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future


Six p s of transmission
Six “P’s” of Transmission

  • Planning

  • Permitting

  • Paying

  • PUC’s

  • Public

  • Policy

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future


ad