Introduction to the junior cert paper
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Introduction to the Junior cert paper. 17/10/13. Higher level. Exam Strategy.

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Introduction to the Junior cert paper

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Introduction to the junior cert paper

Introduction to the Junior cert paper

17/10/13


Higher level

Higher level


Exam strategy

Exam Strategy

  • Timing: Allow five to ten minutes to read the paper carefully at the start. This will get your mind tuned in and help you to make the correct choice of questions. Plan the time you will spend on each question, with more time given to the questions carrying higher marks, and write down the times allocated. Be aware that even within a question there can be different marks for each part so do not spend too long on the questions worth fewer marks.

  • Answering style: You can structure your answer in paragraph form or in point form (provided you use full sentences). As a handy rule, assume 2 marks are allocated for each point. If part of a question is worth 20 marks, then give 10 points. Remember also to totally delete nothing - examiners must mark everything so, if you think you have made a mistake, then put a simple line through the error with a ruler.

  • Order of questions: It is a good idea to start with question six and work back to question one. In this way, the question worth the most marks gets your immediate attention. Too often, people who manage their time badly end up rushing question six (which is worth 33% of total marks).


Walk through the paper question by question

Walk-through the paper (Question by question)

  • Question 1 (Picture questions)This is a good opportunity to pick up marks as the answer will frequently be in the picture. Examine the picture very closely - the answer will often be obvious. Fill in all the blanks as you will not be penalised for a guessed attempt.Question 2 (Document questions)Once again, there are handy marks available here - the answer is usually contained in the document. If you are having difficulty, simply re read the passage. You may be asked for your impression of the author or if the document is a primary or a secondary source. Be ready with words like ‘biased’ and remember there is no obligation to put the answer in your own words, so use the passage itself.Question 3 (Short-answer questions)There is a good choice here as you are marked on ten out of twenty, with 2 marks per question. Read through the questions and answer the ones you find easy. Then do a second sweep, answering as many as you can within the 15 minutes allocated. Make sure you attempt at least ten questions fully, as you won’t be penalised for an unsuccessful attempt.


Introduction to the junior cert paper

  • Question 4 (People in history)Here you are asked to write on a specific historical figure such as Columbus or Robespierre. You must choose one of three options from A and one of three from B. It does not matter whether you write creatively in the first person or not, what matters is that you make important points of information (at least ten good points on each). Do not dwell too much on the early life of the person but get straight to the reasons why he or she had an impact on history.Question 5 (‘Difficult’ documents)For many students, this is the trickiest question on the paper. You are given a source of information and asked questions relating to it. Be very careful how you allocate your time within this question as the thirty marks are not divided evenly. This question always pertains to the parts of the course covered in second year.Question 6 (Long questions)This is the most important question on the paper and your performance here will contribute greatly to your overall grade, so treat it with great care. You have a choice of two questions from four, with each worth 30 marks. Read the options (A,B,C,D) very carefully and choose the two which will maximise your marks, taking account of all the components of each question. Do not begin a section in question six unless you are happy with the entire question.


Junior cert history ordinary

Junior Cert History (Ordinary)


Exam strategy1

Exam Strategy

  • Timing: Allow ten minutes to read the paper carefully at the start. This will get your mind tuned in and help you to make the correct choice of questions. Plan the time you will spend on each question, with more time given to the questions carrying higher marks, and write down the times allocated. Be aware that even within a question there can be different marks for each part so don’t spend too long on the questions worth fewer marks.Answering style: You can structure your answer to question 4 in paragraph form or in point form (provided you use full sentences). Remember also to obliterate nothing - examiners must mark everything so, if you think you have made a mistake, put a simple line through the error with a ruler. Where you see a blank, fill it. You are not penalised for guessing in questions one, two and three.


Walk through the paper question by question1

Walk-through the paper (Question by question)

  • Question 1 (Picture questions)

  • This is a good opportunity to pick up marks as the answer will frequently be in the picture. Examine the picture very closely - the answer will often be obvious. Fill in all the blanks as you will not be penalised for a guessed attempt.

  • Question 2 (Document questions)

  • Once again, there are handy marks available here - the answer is usually contained in the document. If you are having difficulty, simply re read the passage. You may be asked for your impression of the author or if the document is a primary or a secondary source. Be ready with words like ‘biased’ and remember there is no obligation to put the answer in your own words, so use the passage itself.


Introduction to the junior cert paper

  • Question 3 (Short-answer questions)

  • There is a good choice here as you are marked on ten out of twenty, with 2 marks per question. Read through the questions and answer the ones you find easy. Then do a second sweep, answering as many of the harder questions as you can. Remember you have 25 minutes for this question which gives you plenty of time to answer as many as possible. Make sure you attempt at least ten questions fully, as you won’t be penalised for an unsuccessful attempt. There will probably be one or two questions in this section that make no sense, as it covers the entire course. Don’t worry – remember that you only need to have ten correct answers for full marks.

  • Question 4 (People in history)

  • Here you are asked to write on a specific historical figure such as Columbus or Robespierre. You must choose one of three options from A and one of three from B. It does not matter whether you write creatively in the first person or not, what matters is that you make important points of information (at least ten good points on each). Do not dwell too much on the early life of the person but get straight to the reasons why he or she had an impact on history.


The most important factors

The most important factors

  • Always answer the questions asked!!!!!

  • Always read the question carefully!!!

  • Does the question ask to compare, contrast, list, define??


Introduction to the junior cert paper

  • Example

  • Q. Give 3 reasons why the Renaissance began in Italy.Answer 1. The ruins of ancient Rome provided a lot of inspiration for Italian artists, sculptors and architects.Italian cities were very wealthy. Many wealthy people became patrons of artists and paid artists to produce masterpieces.Italy was made up of small states. city states competed with one another to produce great buildings and works of art.Answer 2Lots of great artists and painters lived in Italy. Michelangelo was born in 1475 and he was a great artist, sculptor and architect.He painted the ceiling of the Sistine chapel and designed the dome of St Peter’s.


Example 2 question 8marks

Example 2Question [8marks]

  • Give four reasons why the policies of Adolf Hitler led to World War II Answer

  • Adolf Hitler was born in Austria in 1889. His mother was a peasant and his father was a customs official. He moved to Vienna when he was 18. When he did not get a place at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna he blamed the Jews. He wrote a book called Mein Kampf, which means, my struggle. He wanted to all Germans to live in one large united Germany. He wanted to get rid of the treaty of Versailles, which he thought was unfair. He married a woman called Eva Braun. He committed suicide when he knew he had lost the war.


Introduction to the junior cert paper

  • 1.The question seeks four points of information.

  • 2.The question seeks four points of relevant information.

  • 3.The answer provides lots of accurate information.

  • 4.The answer provides lots of accurate but irrelevant information.

  • 5.It is far too long. 6.The answer contains 9 SRS.

  • 7.The answer contains 4 SRS. 8.The answer contains 2 SRS.


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