Let s talk about logic
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Let’s Talk About Logic. Logic is a system based on propositions . A proposition is a statement that is either true or false (not both). We say that the truth value of a proposition is either true (T) or false (F). Corresponds to 1 and 0 in digital circuits.

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Let’s Talk About Logic

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Let s talk about logic

Let’s Talk About Logic

  • Logic is a system based on propositions.

  • A proposition is a statement that is either true or false (not both).

  • We say that the truth value of a proposition is either true (T) or false (F).

  • Corresponds to 1 and 0 in digital circuits

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Logical operators connectives

Logical Operators (Connectives)

  • Negation (NOT)

  • Conjunction (AND)

  • Disjunction (OR)

  • Exclusive or (XOR)

  • Implication (if – then)

  • Biconditional (if and only if)

  • Truth tables can be used to show how these operators can combine propositions to compound propositions.

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Tautologies and contradictions

Tautologies and Contradictions

  • A tautology is a statement that is always true.

  • Examples:

  • R(R)

  • (PQ)(P)(Q)

  • If ST is a tautology, we write ST.

  • If ST is a tautology, we write ST.

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Tautologies and contradictions1

Tautologies and Contradictions

  • A contradiction is a statement that is alwaysfalse.

  • Examples:

  • R(R)

  • ((PQ)(P)(Q))

  • The negation of any tautology is a contradiction, and the negation of any contradiction is a tautology.

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Propositional functions

Propositional Functions

  • Propositional function (open sentence):

  • statement involving one or more variables,

  • e.g.: x-3 > 5.

  • Let us call this propositional function P(x), where P is the predicate and x is the variable.

What is the truth value of P(2) ?

false

What is the truth value of P(8) ?

false

What is the truth value of P(9) ?

true

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Propositional functions1

Propositional Functions

  • Let us consider the propositional function Q(x, y, z) defined as:

  • x + y = z.

  • Here, Q is the predicate and x, y, and z are the variables.

What is the truth value of Q(2, 3, 5) ?

true

What is the truth value of Q(0, 1, 2) ?

false

What is the truth value of Q(9, -9, 0) ?

true

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Universal quantification

Universal Quantification

  • Let P(x) be a propositional function.

  • Universally quantified sentence:

  • For all x in the universe of discourse P(x) is true.

  • Using the universal quantifier :

  • x P(x) “for all x P(x)” or “for every x P(x)”

  • (Note: x P(x) is either true or false, so it is a proposition, not a propositional function.)

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Universal quantification1

Universal Quantification

  • Example:

  • S(x): x is a UMB student.

  • G(x): x is a genius.

  • What does x (S(x)  G(x)) mean ?

  • “If x is a UMB student, then x is a genius.”

  • or

  • “All UMB students are geniuses.”

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Existential quantification

Existential Quantification

  • Existentially quantified sentence:

  • There exists an x in the universe of discourse for which P(x) is true.

  • Using the existential quantifier :

  • x P(x) “There is an x such that P(x).”

  • “There is at least one x such that P(x).”

  • (Note: x P(x) is either true or false, so it is a proposition, but no propositional function.)

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Existential quantification1

Existential Quantification

  • Example:

  • P(x): x is a UMB professor.

  • G(x): x is a genius.

  • What does x (P(x)  G(x)) mean ?

  • “There is an x such that x is a UMB professor and x is a genius.”

  • or

  • “At least one UMB professor is a genius.”

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Quantification

Quantification

  • Another example:

  • Let the universe of discourse be the real numbers.

  • What does xy (x + y = 320) mean ?

  • “For every x there exists a y so that x + y = 320.”

Is it true?

yes

Is it true for the natural numbers?

no

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Disproof by counterexample

Disproof by Counterexample

  • A counterexample to x P(x) is an object c so that P(c) is false.

  • Statements such as x (P(x)  Q(x)) can be disproved by simply providing a counterexample.

Statement: “All birds can fly.”

Disproved by counterexample: Penguin.

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Negation

Negation

  • (x P(x)) is logically equivalent to x (P(x)).

  • (x P(x)) is logically equivalent to x (P(x)).

  • See Table 3 in Section 1.3.

  • I recommend exercises 5 and 9 in Section 1.3.

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


And now for something completely different

… and now for something completely different…

  • Set Theory

Actually, you will see that logic and set theory are very closely related.

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Set theory

Set Theory

  • Set: Collection of objects (“elements”)

  • aA “a is an element of A” “a is a member of A”

  • aA “a is not an element of A”

  • A = {a1, a2, …, an} “A contains…”

  • Order of elements is meaningless

  • It does not matter how often the same element is listed.

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Set equality

Set Equality

  • Sets A and B are equal if and only if they contain exactly the same elements.

  • Examples:

  • A = {9, 2, 7, -3}, B = {7, 9, -3, 2} :

A = B

  • A = {dog, cat, horse}, B = {cat, horse, squirrel, dog} :

A  B

  • A = {dog, cat, horse}, B = {cat, horse, dog, dog} :

A = B

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Examples for sets

Examples for Sets

  • “Standard” Sets:

  • Natural numbers N = {0, 1, 2, 3, …}

  • Integers Z = {…, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, …}

  • Positive Integers Z+ = {1, 2, 3, 4, …}

  • Real Numbers R = {47.3, -12, , …}

  • Rational Numbers Q = {1.5, 2.6, -3.8, 15, …}(correct definition will follow)

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Examples for sets1

Examples for Sets

  • A = “empty set/null set”

  • A = {z} Note: zA, but z  {z}

  • A = {{b, c}, {c, x, d}}

  • A = {{x, y}} Note: {x, y} A, but {x, y}  {{x, y}}

  • A = {x | P(x)}“set of all x such that P(x)”

  • A = {x | xN x > 7} = {8, 9, 10, …}“set builder notation”

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Examples for sets2

Examples for Sets

  • We are now able to define the set of rational numbers Q:

  • Q = {a/b | aZ bZ+}

  • or

  • Q = {a/b | aZ bZ  b0}

  • And how about the set of real numbers R?

  • R = {r | r is a real number}That is the best we can do.

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Subsets

Subsets

  • A  B “A is a subset of B”

  • A  B if and only if every element of A is also an element of B.

  • We can completely formalize this:

  • A  B  x (xA  xB)

  • Examples:

A = {3, 9}, B = {5, 9, 1, 3}, A  B ?

true

A = {3, 3, 3, 9}, B = {5, 9, 1, 3}, A  B ?

true

A = {1, 2, 3}, B = {2, 3, 4}, A  B ?

false

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Subsets1

U

B

C

A

Subsets

  • Useful rules:

  • A = B  (A  B)  (B  A)

  • (A  B)  (B  C)  A  C (see Venn Diagram)

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Subsets2

Subsets

  • Useful rules:

  •   A for any set A

  • A  A for any set A

  • Proper subsets:

  • A  B “A is a proper subset of B”

  • A  B  x (xA  xB)  x (xB  xA)

  • or

  • A  B  x (xA  xB)  x (xB  xA)

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Cardinality of sets

Cardinality of Sets

  • If a set S contains n distinct elements, nN,we call S a finite set with cardinality n.

  • Examples:

  • A = {Mercedes, BMW, Porsche}, |A| = 3

B = {1, {2, 3}, {4, 5}, 6}

|B| = 4

C = 

|C| = 0

D = { xN | x  7000 }

|D| = 7001

E = { xN | x  7000 }

E is infinite!

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


The power set

The Power Set

  • 2Aor P(A) “power set of A”

  • 2A = {B | B  A} (contains all subsets of A)

  • Examples:

  • A = {x, y, z}

  • 2A = {, {x}, {y}, {z}, {x, y}, {x, z}, {y, z}, {x, y, z}}

  • A = 

  • 2A = {}

  • Note: |A| = 0, |2A| = 1

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


The power set1

The Power Set

  • Cardinality of power sets:

  • | 2A | = 2|A|

  • Imagine each element in A has an “on/off” switch

  • Each possible switch configuration in A corresponds to one element in 2A

  • For 3 elements in A, there are 222 = 8 elements in 2A

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Cartesian product

Cartesian Product

  • The ordered n-tuple (a1, a2, a3, …, an) is an ordered collection of objects.

  • Two ordered n-tuples (a1, a2, a3, …, an) and (b1, b2, b3, …, bn) are equal if and only if they contain exactly the same elements in the same order, i.e. ai = bi for 1  i  n.

  • The Cartesian product of two sets is defined as:

  • AB = {(a, b) | aA  bB}

  • Example: A = {x, y}, B = {a, b, c}AB = {(x, a), (x, b), (x, c), (y, a), (y, b), (y, c)}

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Cartesian product1

Cartesian Product

  • Note that:

  • A = 

  • A = 

  • For non-empty sets A and B: AB  AB  BA

  • |AB| = |A||B|

  • The Cartesian product of two or more sets is defined as:

  • A1A2…An = {(a1, a2, …, an) | aiA for 1  i  n}

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


Set operations

Set Operations

  • Union: AB = {x | xA  xB}

  • Example: A = {a, b}, B = {b, c, d}

  • AB = {a, b, c, d}

  • Intersection: AB = {x | xA  xB}

  • Example: A = {a, b}, B = {b, c, d}

  • AB = {b}

Applied Discrete Mathematics

Week 1: Logic and Sets


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