Parent satisfaction lutheran colleges and public universities
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Parent Satisfaction Lutheran Colleges and Public Universities. Findings of the LECNA College Sophomore Parent Satisfaction Research February 2007. Study Details. The following charts comprise findings related to the study conducted by Hardwick~Day.

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Parent satisfaction lutheran colleges and public universities

Parent SatisfactionLutheran Colleges and Public Universities

Findings of the LECNA

College Sophomore

Parent Satisfaction Research

February 2007


Study details

Study Details

  • The following charts comprise findings related to the study conducted by Hardwick~Day.

  • 384 parents participated in a 10-minute telephone survey on topics regarding their satisfaction with their child’s college experience.

  • Participant names were obtained from LECNA colleges and were divided into two groups:

    • 236 parents of sophomores currently enrolled at LECNA colleges (ELCA and LCMS colleges represented)

    • 148 parents of sophomores who were admitted to LECNA colleges, but enrolled instead at a public university (ELCA and LCMS colleges represented)

  • Transfer students were excluded from the study.

  • Interviews were conducted during December 2006.


Colleges submitting student names

Colleges Submitting Student Names

Augustana College -Sioux Falls, SD

California Lutheran University

Capital University, OH

Carthage College, WI

Concordia University -Austin, TX

ConcordiaUniversity -Irvine, CA

Concordia University -Portland, OR

Concordia University -Chicago, IL

Concordia University -Seward, NE

Concordia University -St. Paul, MN

Dana College, NE

Gustavus Adolphus, MN

Luther College, IA

Roanoke College, VA

St. Olaf College, MN

Susquehanna College, PA

Texas Lutheran University

Valparaiso University, IN

Waldorf College, IA

Wartburg College, IA


Participant profile

Participant Profile

  • Study participants include a high percentage of married parents.

  • Household income is higher for the Public University families than the Lutheran College families.

  • Two-thirds of participants have a college or graduate degree.

University Enrolled LECNA Enrolled

From

Total Total ELCALCMS TotalELCALCMS

Respondent: female72%75%80%64%70%71%67%

Married92%93%91%98%91%89%96%

Median HH income$91K$102K$99K$109K$85K $88K$81K

Education: BA

or higher67%63%65%61%69%71%63%

n=3841481044423616670


Student profile

Student Profile

  • Over half of the students were female.

  • Even at the Public Universities, the vast majority lived on campus their freshman year.

  • A very low percentage were first-generation college students.

University Enrolled LECNA Enrolled

From

Total Total ELCALCMS TotalELCALCMS

Daughter 56%57%56%61%55%54%57%

Lived on campus92%91%94%82%93%93%94%

First generation

college student7%5%4%7%8%7%11%

n=3841481044423616670


Satisfaction with the educational experience

Satisfaction with the Educational Experience


Parent satisfaction lutheran colleges and public universities

Lutheran College Parents Are More Likely to Be “Very Satisfied” Overall with the Educational Experience

  • Three of five Lutheran College parents are “very satisfied” overall with the educational experience their child is getting.

  • This compares favorably to less than half of the Public University parents.

12A. How would you rate your overall satisfaction with the educational experience your (son/daughter) is getting at college?


Parent satisfaction lutheran colleges and public universities

Parents Tend to Think their Child Would Give a Slightly Lower Overall Satisfaction Rating than they Gave

  • Although three of five Lutheran College parents are “very satisfied” overall with the educational experience their child is getting, only half think their daughter or son is “very satisfied.”

  • This same pattern holds true for Public University parents.

12B. How do you think your (son/daughter) would rate (his/her) overall satisfaction with the educational experience?


Many issues impact the overall satisfaction rating

Many Issues Impact the Overall Satisfaction Rating

  • For parents, quality of academic instruction is universally the most significant of all items tested in regards to overall satisfaction.

  • Amount of contact with professors is much more important to Lutheran College parents, while affordability is the second-highest of the items for Public University parents.

  • Two other items tested, “level of academic difficulty” and “social life and activities” were less significant in the overall satisfaction rating (not shown).

13. Please indicate how significant each of the following items is in your overall satisfaction with your (son’s/daughter’s) college (% rating “very significant”).


Lutheran college parents are more likely than university parents to rate the college a good value

Lutheran College Parents Are More Likely than University Parents to Rate the College a “Good Value”

  • More than eight of ten (82%) Lutheran College parents rate their son’s or daughter’s college a “good value” (4 or 5 on a 5-point scale).

  • Only 70% of Public University parents rate the university a “good value,” even though it is likely to cost less than a Lutheran college.

  • Families making $100K or more tend to give higher value ratings at both public universities and Lutheran colleges, although neither is significant.

14. How would you rate the value of the education at your (son’s/daughter’s) college, compared to the amount paid?


Nearly all parents would recommend their student s college or university

Nearly All Parents Would Recommend Their Student’s College or University

  • There is no difference between Lutheran College parents and Public University parents in the rate that would recommend the college or university to family or friends.

16. Would you recommend your (son’s/daughter’s) college to friends or family members considering colleges?


Satisfaction summary

Satisfaction Summary

  • Lutheran College parents are more likely to be “very satisfied” with the overall educational experience (60% vs 41% of Public University parents).

  • Lutheran College parents rate quality of instruction, amount of contact with professors, fitting in with other students and quality of academic advising as most significant in their satisfaction rating.

  • Public University parents rate quality of instruction and affordability as most significant in their satisfaction rating.

  • Public University parents are less likely to rate the university as a “good value” for the amount paid.

  • Regardless of the satisfaction rating, virtually all would recommend the college or university to friends and family.


The college application and funding process

The College Application and Funding Process


Public university students applied to more colleges than lutheran college students

Public University Students Applied to More Colleges than Lutheran College Students

  • Over half of Public University parents report their child applied to four or more colleges.

    • This compares to one in three parents of Lutheran College students.

  • One in five Lutheran College students only applied to that college; this is primarily true of LCMS colleges (33% vs 11% for ELCA colleges).

  • A small percentage of Public University parents (6%) did not remember their child had applied to a second college (the Lutheran college that provided the student’s name.)

Average: 3.74.33.4

1A. To how many colleges did your (son/daughter) apply?


Private colleges mainly non lecna were second choice schools for both groups

Private Colleges (Mainly non-LECNA) Were Second Choice Schools for Both Groups

  • For both groups, private colleges are the second choice of more than half.

  • Church-based privates were chosen over secular private colleges 4:1.

  • One in four (28%) Public University parents named a Lutheran college as their second choice.

    • One in three (34%) named a public university.

  • Although Lutheran College parents were as likely as their counterparts to name a church-based private college, the college was somewhat more often affiliated with another faith (27% non-Lutheran college vs 21% Lutheran college).

    • A larger number named a public university (36%) as second choice.

2A. Besides (enrolled college), which one other college did your (son/daughter) most seriously consider? Think only about colleges (he/she) was admitted to.

based to those applying to 2+ colleges


Public universities offer merit scholarships frequently

Public Universities Offer Merit Scholarships… Frequently!

Average (median) amount per year:

$6.5K$2K$8K

  • While most Lutheran colleges offer merit and talent scholarships, it is perhaps surprising that universities are also offering these types of scholarships to the extent that they are.

1B. Did your (son/daughter) receive any scholarships from (enrolled college), such as a talent scholarship or those based on academic performance?

1C. How much would you say (he/she) received for a scholarship, that is before any need-based aid may have been added? Please answer in terms of one year of study.

1E. And did your final package include any additional grant aid--an award that does not have to be paid back?


Second choice colleges were less likely to offer scholarships and grants

Second-Choice Colleges Were Less Likely to Offer Scholarships and Grants

Average (median) amount per year:

$5.5K$6K$5K

  • The largest group of second choice colleges for both groups is private colleges, and the similar offers reflect that.

  • Some parents (about 10%) indicated they didn’t complete the process at their second choice college.

2B. Did your (son/daughter) receive any scholarships from that college?

2C. How much would you say (he/she) received for a scholarship, that is before any need-based aid may have been added? Please answer in terms of one year of study.

2E. And did your final package include any additional grant aid--an award that does not have to be paid back?

based to those applying to 2+ colleges


Most students submitted the fafsa to the college where they enrolled

Most Students Submitted the FAFSA to the College Where They Enrolled

  • Four of five or more submitted the FAFSA to the college where they ultimately enrolled.

  • The financial aid package was “very important” to the majority of Lutheran College parents who applied; nearly two-thirds have family incomes under $100,000.

  • Financial aid was “very important” to fewer public university parents, over half of whom have family incomes of $100,000 or more.

1D. Did you submit the FAFSA for need-based financial aid at this college?

3C. How important was the financial aid package in your (son’s/daughter’s) decision to enroll at the college?

(based to all parents of enrolled students)


Regardless of college type the majority of parents are primarily responsible for college costs

Regardless of College Type, The Majority of Parents Are Primarily Responsible for College Costs

  • Three of five parents say they are primarily responsible for paying for the college education.The percentage for Public University parents is not significantly higher.

  • Similar significant differences are found by income in each group.

    • Only half of those making under $100,000 say the parents are primarily responsible.

    • Four of five parents in households making $100,000 or more say they are primarily responsible for the college costs.

4. Not including any grant or scholarship sponsors, who is primarily responsible for paying for your (son’s/daughter’s) college education?


Funding summary

Funding Summary

  • Students applied to three or four colleges, on average.

    • LCMS colleges’ enrolled students were more likely than ELCA colleges’ enrolled students to apply to only one college.

  • Church-based private colleges are a popular second choice; and not just Lutheran colleges.

  • While nearly all Lutheran Colleges offered a scholarship, nearly half of the Public Universities did as well, although at a lower dollar amount.

  • Most families submitted the FAFSA to the college where the student enrolled; for most Lutheran College families, the financial aid package was “very important” to their decision to enroll.

    • Lutheran College families are more likely to make less than $100K.


Involvement at college

Involvement at College


Lutheran college students are more likely to meet a mentor or role model at college

Lutheran College Students Are More Likely to Meet a Mentor or Role Model at College

  • Three of four Lutheran College parents say their son or daughter met someone at college who is a mentor or role model for them, especially professors and advisors.

  • Only half of Public University parents think their child met a role model or mentor at college.

11. Who, if anyone, has your (son/ daughter) met at college who is a mentor or role model?


Parents report students are involved in a variety of activities at college

Parents Report Students Are Involved in a Variety of Activities at College

  • Nearly all students (94%) are involved in some of the activities listed.

  • Lutheran College students are involved in more activities, on average (3.3 vs. 2.6).

  • Many students in both groups have been involved in volunteer or service activities, followed by religious activities, although both are higher for Lutheran College students.

  • Other activities that have higher participation rates among Lutheran College students are a work-study program, music or theatre performance and varsity athletics.

  • Just over one in ten students at either college type participated in fraternities/sororities or campus publications/student government (not shown).

10. Is your (son/daughter) involved in any of the following at college?


Parent satisfaction lutheran colleges and public universities

Lutheran College Students Are More Likely to Be “Very Involved” in Social Activities During the Freshman Year

  • Two of five Lutheran College parents said their child was “very involved” in social activities during their freshman year.

  • Less than one in three Public University parents rated their son or daughter as “very involved.”

6. How would you rate your (son’s/daughter’s) level of involvement in social activities at college during the freshman year?


Parent satisfaction lutheran colleges and public universities

Lutheran College Parents Are More Likely to Be “Very Satisfied” with their Child’s Ability to Make Friends During the Freshman Year

  • Two of three Lutheran College parents are “very satisfied” with their son’s or daughter’s ease of making friends during their freshman year.

  • About half of Public University parents are “very satisfied.”

5. How would you rate your satisfaction with your (son’s/daughter’s) ease of making friends at college during the freshman year?


Parent satisfaction lutheran colleges and public universities

Parents Generally Believe their Child Was Able to Do a Good Job Balancing Social and Academic Life During the Freshman Year

  • Regardless of school type, three of four parents give a positive rating to their son’s or daughter’s ability to balance academic and social life during their freshman year.

  • There are a significantly higher number of parents of Lutheran College students (in both ELCA and LCMS colleges) who believe their child didn’t do this balancing act all that well (10% vs 3% at public universities).

7. How would you rate your (son’s/daughter’s) ability to balance social life with academic life at college during the freshman year?


Parent satisfaction lutheran colleges and public universities

Lutheran College Parents Tend to Rate Academic Life at their Child’s College as More Difficult than Their Son or Daughter Had Expected

  • A rating of “3” on this question would be “as expected.”

  • Lutheran College parents are two-and-a-half times more likely to say the academics were “more difficult” than “easier” than expected (45% vs. 18%).

    • ELCA colleges were most likely to be rated “very difficult” (16% vs. 7% for LCMS colleges)

  • The largest group of Public University parents’ ratings fall in that “as expected” category. They are only one-and-a-half times more likely to say “more difficult” (36% vs. 24% “easier”).

8. How would you rate academic life at college compared to what your (son/daughter) expected before (he/she) enrolled?


Involvement summary

Involvement Summary

  • Lutheran College students are more likely to have met a mentor or role model during their freshman year.

  • Lutheran College students are involved in more activities on campus, and also involved to a greater degree.

  • Lutheran College parents are more likely to be “very satisfied” with their daughter or son’s ability to make friends during their freshman year.

  • Three of four parents at Lutheran Colleges and Public Universities say their child was able to balance social and academic life well during their freshman year.

    • However, 10% of Lutheran College parents believe their child did not do this well.

  • Lutheran College parents (especially ELCA) are more likely to rate the college as “more difficult” than their child expected.


Other factors

Other Factors


Parents report students high school friends are primarily attending public universities

Parents Report Students’ High School Friends Are Primarily Attending Public Universities

  • The majority of friends of both groups are attending public universities more than other types of colleges.

  • For Lutheran College students, nearly as many parents report their child’s friends are attending a private college (36%) as those whose friends attend public universities (45%).

  • For Public University students, the gap between public and private is much greater. Only 11% have most friends attending a private college, while 73% have the majority of friends attending public universities.

17. How would you characterize what the majority of your (son’s/daughter’s) friends from high school are currently doing?


Parent satisfaction lutheran colleges and public universities

Lutherans Are More Likely to Attend a Lutheran College, While Catholics Opted for Public Universities

  • More parents of Lutheran College students report that they are Lutheran than parents of Public University students in the study (43% vs 32%).

    • Parents of students who applied at LCMS colleges are more likely to be Lutheran--whether they enrolled at Lutheran Colleges or Public Universities.

  • Catholics who applied to Lutheran colleges were more likely to end up at Public Universities (26% vs 14% at Lutheran Colleges).

  • For parents of all other religions, there is no difference between whether the student enrolled at a Lutheran college or public university.

List Source:

ELCALCMS

25% 48%

38% 56%

28%20%

17% 9%

19%11%

14%14%

7% 2%

10% 3%

21. To make sure we have included the opinions of all religious groups, please tell me the religion you consider yourself most affiliated with?


Parent satisfaction lutheran colleges and public universities

Lutheran College Parents Are More Likely to Have Met the College President or Have Heard the President Speak

  • Lutheran College parents are nearly twice as likely as Public University parents to have met the college president or have heard the president speak.

15. Have you had occasion to meet your (son’s/daughter’s) college president or hear the president speak?


Other factors summary

Other Factors Summary

  • The peer group has an influence on college choice; most Public University students’ friends also attend public universities.

  • Lutheran College students have friends attending private colleges as well as public universities.

  • Two in five participants are Lutheran, a higher proportion of them have children at Lutheran colleges than public universities.

  • Catholics in the sample tend to have children attending public universities rather than Lutheran colleges.

    • No other religion shows differences between college types.

  • Lutheran College parents have a stronger connection to the college as far as meeting or hearing the college president speak.


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