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The Age of Jackson. Without union our independence and liberty would never have been achieved; without union they never can be maintained. ... The loss of liberty, of all good government, of peace, plenty, and happiness, must inevitably follow a dissolution of the Union.

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The age of jackson
The Age of Jackson

Without union our independence and liberty would never have been achieved; without union they never can be maintained. ... The loss of liberty, of all good government, of peace, plenty, and happiness, must inevitably follow a dissolution of the Union.

--Andrew Jackson, Second Inaugural Address, 1833


Who was andrew jackson
Who was Andrew Jackson?

  • Nicknamed "Old Hickory"

  • The seventh President of the United States (1829-1837)

  • Hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815)

  • He was the first President from the American frontier


Jackson was
Jackson was…

  • The first populist president who did not come from the aristocracy

  • The first to marry a divorcee

  • The first to use an informal "Kitchen Cabinet" of advisers

  • The first president to use the "pocket veto" to kill a congressional bill (legislation fails to become law if Congress adjourns and the president has not signed the bill in question)


Jackson the common man s president
Jackson: the “Common Man’s President”

Four Areas of Contention

  • The Spoils System: After election, Jackson immediately removes 10 percent of all officeholders under his power and appoints his friends and supporters

  • Native American Policies: Congress passes Jackson’s Indian Removal Act, allowing Jackson to move Native Americans off their land and to reservations west of the Mississippi River.

  • The Bank War: Jackson attempts to eliminate the National Bank because he felt it was a “corrupt institution” that kept the common man down.

  • The Nullification Crisis: South Carolina called a state convention that nullified the tariffs of 1828 and 1832 within their borders and threatened to secede if the federal government attempted to collect those tariff duties.


Jacksonian democracy

Democratic or not?

Jackson’s goal:

to help the common man

take the government away from the rich elite.

He contradicted many of the basic ideas of the Constitution

challenged long-held beliefs about American democracy.

So the question remains, “Was Andrew Jackson democratic?”

Jacksonian Democracy

“No one likes him, except the people."


So was jackson democratic
So was Jackson Democratic?

The Spoils System

  • Jackson removed 690 people from office

    • replaced them with friends and supporters

    • (“to the victor goes the spoils”).

  • Allowed people who hadn’t previously been allowed in government to participate

  • Made decisions according to personal gain.


So was jackson democratic1
So was Jackson Democratic?

Indian Removal Act 1830

  • Jackson took people from their homes

  • laced their blankets with smallpox

  • forced them to walk hundreds of miles.

  • The term "Trails of Tears“

    • period of ten years

    • over 70,000 Indians had to move to areas assigned to tribes in Oklahoma.

  • He claimed he was freeing up land for the American citizen (voters).


So was jackson democratic2
So was Jackson Democratic?

The Bank War

  • The National bank maintained US currency and maintained much of the economic wealth of the United States.

  • Jackson felt the Bank was a “privileged institution” that served only the interests of the wealthy and did nothing for the common man.

    • ”too much power, too few hands.”

  • Jackson vetoes the bank’s charter in 1836

    • asked the Secretary of the Treasury to stop putting government money in the bank.

    • He refused,

    • Jackson fired him

      • selected someone who would put money in state Banks (“Pet banks”)

  • Results: New political party (“Whigs”) created to oppose Jackson; Nation goes into a depression; Jackson ignores Checks and Balances; Constitutional problems.


So was jackson democratic3
So was Jackson Democratic?

Nullification Crisis

  • In response to the Tariff of 1832

    • South Carolina called a state convention that nullified the tariffs of 1828 and 1832 within their borders

    • threatened to secede if the federal government attempted to collect those tariff duties

  • Jackson: nullification = treason

    • dispatched ships to Charleston harbor and began strengthening federal fortifications there.

    • Congress supported the president

    • passed a Force Bill authorized Jackson to use soldiers to enforce the tariff measures

  • Henry Clay again (Great Compromiser) to the rescue!

    • Passed the Tariff of 1833.

      • Gradual reduction of the tariff over 10 years down

      • to the level which had existed in 1816.


Bibliography
Bibliography

PPT adapted from: http://facweb.eths.k12.il.us/moranm/powerpoints/aj.ppt#265,10,Jacksonian Democracy

Including information from:

  • http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/nc/bio/public/jackson.htm

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Jackson

    by Lisa Torres


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