Analyzing transactions
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Analyzing Transactions. Chapter 2. Learning Objectives. Describe the characteristics of an account and a chart of accounts. Describe and illustrate journalizing transactions using the double-entry accounting system.

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Analyzing transactions

Analyzing Transactions

Chapter 2


Learning objectives

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the characteristics of an account and a chart of accounts.

  • Describe and illustrate journalizing transactions using the double-entry accounting system.

  • Describe and illustrate the journalizing and posting of transactions to accounts.

  • Prepare an unadjusted trial balance and explain how it can be used to discover errors.

  • Describe and illustrate the use of horizontal analysis in evaluating a company’s performance and financial condition.


Learning objective

Learning Objective

1

Describe the characteristics of an account and a chart of accounts


Using accounts to record transactions

Using Accounts to Record Transactions

  • Accounting systems are designed to show the increases and decreases in each accounting equation element as a separate record. This record is called an account.


Using accounts to record transactions1

Using Accounts to Record Transactions


The t account

The T Account

Title

The T account has a title


The t account1

The T Account

Title

The left side of the account is called the debitside.


The t account2

The T Account

Title

Debit

Credit

The right side of the account is called the creditside.


The t account3

The T Account

Cash

(a)25,000(b)20,000

(d)7,500(e)3,650

Credit Side of Account

(f)950

Debit Side of Account

(h)2,000

Balance5,900

Balance of the account


Chart of accounts

Chart of Accounts

  • A group of accounts for a business entity is called a ledger.

  • A list of the accounts in the ledger is called a chart of accounts.


Chart of accounts1

Chart of Accounts

  • Assets are resources owned by the business. Some examples of assets follow:

    • Cash

    • Supplies

    • Accounts receivable

    • Buildings


Chart of accounts2

Chart of Accounts

  • Liabilities are debts owed to outsiders (creditors). Some examples of liabilities follow:

    • Accounts payable

    • Notes payable

    • Wages payable

    • Interest payable


Chart of accounts3

Chart of Accounts

  • Owner’s equity is the owner’s right to the assets of the business after all liabilities have been paid. For a proprietorship, the owner’s equity is represented by the balance of the owner’s capital account.

  • A drawing account represents the amount of withdrawals made by the owner.


Chart of accounts4

Chart of Accounts

  • Revenues are increases in owner’s equity as a result of selling services or products to customers. Some examples of revenue accounts follow:

    • Fees earned

    • Commission revenue

    • Rent revenue


Chart of accounts5

Chart of Accounts

  • The using up of assets or consuming services in the process of generating revenues results in expenses. Some examples of expenses follow:

    • Wages expense

    • Rent expense

    • Miscellaneous expense


Chart of accounts6

Chart of Accounts


Learning objective1

Learning Objective

2

Describe and illustrate journalizing transactions using the double-entry accounting system


Double entry accounting system

Double-Entry Accounting System

  • All businesses use what is called the double-entry accounting system. This system is based on the accounting equation and requires:

    • Every business transaction to be recorded in at least two accounts.

    • The total debits recorded for each transaction to be equal to the total credits recorded.


Balance sheet accounts

Balance Sheet Accounts

  • The debit and credit rules for balance sheet accounts are as follows:


Income statement accounts

Income Statement Accounts

  • The debit and credit rules for income statement accounts are based on their relationship with owner’s equity.


Owner withdrawals

Owner Withdrawals

  • The debit and credit rules for recording owner withdrawals are based on the effect of owner withdrawals on owner’s equity.


Normal balances

Normal Balances

  • The sum of the increases in an account is usually equal to or greater than the sum of the decreases in the account. Thus, the normal balance ofan account is either a debit or a credit depending on whether increases in the account are recorded as debits or credits.


Rules of debit and credit normal balances of accounts

Rules of Debit and Credit – Normal Balances of Accounts


Normal balances1

Normal Balances

Increases

(Normal Bal.)

Decreases

Balance sheet accounts:

AssetDebitCredit

LiabilityCreditDebit

Owner’s Equity:

Capital CreditDebit

DrawingDebitCredit

Income statement accounts:

RevenueCreditDebit

ExpenseDebitCredit


Transaction a

Transaction A

  • On November 1, Chris Clark opens a new business and deposits $25,000 in a bank account in the name of NetSolutions.


Transaction a1

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (investment)

Transaction A

Step 2

Step 3

Step 1

Step 5

Step 4

Step 3

increase

increase


Journalizing

Journalizing

Journalizing requires the following steps:

  • Step 1.The date of the transaction is entered in the Date column.

  • Step 2.The title of the account to be debited is recorded at the left-hand margin under the Description column, and the amount to be debited is entered in the Debit column.

(continued)


Journalizing1

Journalizing

  • Step 3.The title of the account to be credited is listed below and to the right of the debited account title, and the amount to be credited is entered in the Credit column.

  • Step 4.A brief description may be entered below the credited account.

(continued)


Journalizing2

Journalizing

  • Step 5.The Post. Ref. (Posting Reference) column is left blank when the journal entry is initially recorded. This column is used later when the journal entry amounts are transferred to the accounts in the ledger.


Journalizing3

Journalizing

  • A transaction is initially entered in a record called a journal.


Journalizing4

Journalizing

  • A transaction is initially entered in a record called a journal.

  • The process of recording a transaction in the journal is called journalizing.


Journalizing5

Journalizing

  • A transaction is initially entered in a record called a journal.

  • The process of recording a transaction in the journal is called journalizing.

  • The entry in the journal is called a journal entry.


Transaction b

Transaction B

  • On November 5, NetSolutions paid $20,000 for the purchase of land as a future building site.


Transaction b1

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity

Transaction B

increase

decrease


Transaction c

Transaction C

  • On November 10, NetSolutions purchased supplies on account for $1,350.


Transaction c1

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity

Transaction C

increase

increase


Transaction d

Transaction D

  • On November 18, NetSolutions received cash of $7,500 from customers for services provided.


Transaction d1

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Revenue)

Transaction D

increase

in revenues

increase


Transaction e

Transaction E

  • On November 30, NetSolutions incurred the following expenses: wages, $2,125; rent, $800; utilities, $450; and miscellaneous, $275.


Transaction e1

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Expense)

Transaction E

All four expense accounts increase

decrease


Transaction f

Transaction F

  • On November 30, NetSolutions paid creditors on account, $950.


Transaction f1

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity

Transaction F

decrease

decrease


Transaction g

Transaction G

  • NetSolutions purchased $1,350 of supplies on November 10. Chris Clark determined that the cost of supplies on hand on November 30 was $550.


Transaction g1

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Expense)

Transaction G

Supplies used = $1,350 - $550 = $800

increase

in expense

decrease


Transaction h

Transaction H

  • On November 30, Chris Clark withdrew $2,000 from NetSolutions for personal use.


Transaction h1

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Drawing)

Transaction H

decrease

increase

in drawing


Learning objective2

Learning Objective

3

Describe and illustrate the journalizing and posting of transactions to accounts.


Posting journal entries to accounts

Posting Journal Entries to Accounts

  • The process of transferring the debits and credits from the journal entries to the accounts is called posting.


Posting journal entries to accounts1

Posting Journal Entries to Accounts

  • On December 1, NetSolutions paid a premium of $2,400 for an insurance policy for liability, theft, and fire. The policy covers a one-year period.


Posting journal entries to accounts2

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity

0

Posting Journal Entries to Accounts

decrease

increase


Exhibit 4 steps in posting

Exhibit 4 - Steps in Posting

  • Step 1.The date of the transaction is entered in the Date column of Prepaid Insurance.


Exhibit 4 steps in posting1

Exhibit 4 - Steps in Posting

  • Step 2.The amount (2,400) is entered in the Debit column of Prepaid Insurance.

2,400

2,400


Exhibit 4 steps in posting2

Exhibit 4 - Steps in Posting

  • Step 3.The journal page number (2) is entered in the account’s Post. Ref. column.

2


Exhibit 4 steps in posting3

Exhibit 4 - Steps in Posting

  • Step 4.The account number (15) is entered in the journal’s Post. Ref. column.


Recording and posting of a debit and a credit

Recording and Posting of a Debit and a Credit

These steps are repeated to post to the Cash account.


December transactions

December Transactions

  • On December 1, NetSolutions paid rent for December, $800. The company from which NetSolutions is renting its store space now requires the payment of rent on the first of each month, rather than at the end of the month.


December transactions1

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Expense)

0

December Transactions

decrease

increase

in expense


December transactions2

December Transactions

  • On December 1, NetSolutions received an offer from a local retailer to rent the land purchased on November 5. The retailer plans to use the land as a parking lot for its employees and customers. NetSolutions agreed to rent the land to the retailer for three months, with the rent payable in advance. NetSolutions received $360 for three months’ rent beginning December 1.

  • The liability created by receiving the cash in advance of providing the service is called unearned revenue.


December transactions3

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity

December Transactions

increase

increase


December transactions4

December Transactions

  • On December 4, NetSolutions purchased office equipment on account from Executive Supply Co. for $1,800.


December transactions5

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity

December Transactions

increase

increase


December transactions6

December Transactions

  • On December 6, NetSolutions paid $180 for a newspaper advertisement.


December transactions7

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Expense)

December Transactions

decrease

increase

in expense


December transactions8

December Transactions

  • On December 11, NetSolutions paid creditors $400.


December transactions9

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity

December Transactions

decrease

decrease


December transactions10

December Transactions

  • On December 13, NetSolutions paid a receptionist and a part-time assistant $950 for two weeks’ wages.


December transactions11

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Expense)

December Transactions

decrease

increase

in expense


December transactions12

December Transactions

  • On December 16, NetSolutions received $3,100 from fees earned for the first half of December.


December transactions13

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Revenue)

December Transactions

increase

increase

in revenues


December transactions14

December Transactions

  • Fees earned on account totaled $1,750 for the first half of December.


December transactions15

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Revenue)

December Transactions

increase

increase

in revenues


December transactions16

December Transactions

  • On December 20, NetSolutions paid $900 to Executive Supply Co. on the $1,800 debt owed from the December 4 transaction.


December transactions17

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity

December Transactions

decrease

decrease


December transactions18

December Transactions

  • On December 21, NetSolutions received $650 from customers in payment of their accounts.


December transactions19

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity

December Transactions

increase

decrease


December transactions20

December Transactions

  • On December 23, NetSolutions paid $1,450 for supplies.


December transactions21

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity

December Transactions

decrease

increase


December transactions22

December Transactions

  • On December 27, NetSolutions paid the receptionist and the part-time assistant $1,200 for two weeks’ wages.


December transactions23

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Expense)

December Transactions

decrease

increase

in expense


December transactions24

December Transactions

  • On December 31, NetSolutions paid its $310 telephone bill for the month.


December transactions25

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Expense)

December Transactions

decrease

increase

in expense


December transactions26

December Transactions

  • On December 31, NetSolutions paid its $225 electric bill for the month.


December transactions27

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Expense)

December Transactions

increase

in expense

decrease


December transactions28

December Transactions

  • On December 31, NetSolutions received $2,870 from fees earned for the second half of December.


December transactions29

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Revenue)

December Transactions

increase

increase

in revenues


December transactions30

December Transactions

  • On December 31, fees earned on account totaled $1,120 for the second half of December.


December transactions31

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Revenue)

December Transactions

increase

increase

in revenues


December transactions32

December Transactions

  • On December 31, Chris Clark withdrew $2,000 for personal use.


December transactions33

Accounting Equation Impact

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity (Drawing)

December Transactions

decrease

increase

in drawing


Learning objective3

Learning Objective

4

Prepare an unadjusted trial balance and explain how it can be used to discover errors


Trial balance

Trial Balance

  • The equality of debits and credits in the ledger should be proven at the end of each accounting period by preparing a trial balance.


Unadjusted trial balance

Unadjusted Trial Balance


Trial balance errors transposition

Trial Balance Errors - Transposition

  • A transposition occurs when the order of the digits is changed by mistake, such as writing $542 as $452 or $524.


Trial balance errors slide

Trial Balance Errors - Slide

  • In a slide, the entire number is moved one or more spaces to the right or the left by mistake, such as writing $542.00 as $54.20 or $97.50 as $975.00.


Errors not affecting the trial balance

Errors Not Affecting the Trial Balance

  • If an error has already been journalized and posted to the ledger, a correcting journalentry is normally prepared.


Errors not affecting the trial balance1

Errors Not Affecting the Trial Balance

  • Another type of error is a posting error.

  • Assume that on May 5 a $12,500 purchase of office equipment on account was incorrectly journalized and posted as a debit to Supplies and a credit to Accounts Payable for $12,500.

  • The entry to correct the error is:


Learning objective4

Learning Objective

5

Describe and illustrate the use of horizontal analysis in evaluating a company’s performance and financial condition.


Horizontal analysis

Horizontal Analysis

  • In horizontal analysis, the amount of each item on a current financial statement is compared with the same item on an earlier statement.


Horizontal analysis1

Horizontal Analysis

  • In horizontal analysis, the amount of each item on a current financial statement is compared with the same item on an earlier statement.

  • When two statements are being compared, the earlier statement is used as the base for computing the amount and the percent of change.


Horizontal analysis2

Horizontal Analysis


Analyzing transactions1

Analyzing Transactions

The End


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