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Community Foundation of the Ozarks Essential Question #2 How do you Promote Planned Giving in your Community or Organization?. Pat Gartland Executive Director, Springfield Boys and Girls Club. Gary Funk President, Community Foundation of the Ozarks. Hosted by:.

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Community Foundation of the OzarksEssential Question #2How do you Promote Planned Giving in your Community or Organization?


Hosted by

Pat Gartland

Executive Director, Springfield Boys and Girls Club

Gary Funk

President, Community Foundation of the Ozarks

Hosted by:


Community foundation of the ozarks essential questions series

Community Foundation of the Ozarks Essential Questions Series

All sessions are held at 10:00 a.m.

  • November 28th: Why do Life Estate Gifts have Great Potential?

  • January 23rd: How do we Strengthen Donor Relationships?

  • February 27th: What are Family and Community Funds?

  • March 27th: What are the Advantages of Having Scholarships with the Community Foundation?

  • April 24th: How are your Charitable Funds Invested?


Planned giving stories

Planned Giving Stories

The Barker Shannon Scholarship

This $125,000 endowed scholarship fund, which is a component fund of the Mountain Grove Area Community Foundation, was established by Mr. Barker Shannon through a bequest. It will award a scholarship each year to a graduating senior of Mountain Grove High School who shows promise of academic success. David Pointer, a Gainesville attorney, assisted Mr. Shannon with his planned giving.


Planned giving stories1

Planned Giving Stories

The Williams Life Estate

John and Nancy Williams gifted their Carthage home to the Community Foundation of Southwest Missouri, Inc. through a life estate, and chose to live in the house until John passed away. The proceeds from the sale of house went into six designated funds established by John Williams prior to his death. Kevin Checkett, a Carthage attorney, facilitated this estate gift.


Planned giving stories2

Planned Giving Stories

J. Kenneth Awberry and Iva M. Awberry Scholarship Fund

This $1.5 million endowed scholarship fund was established by a bequest from a leading family in the Branson area. It provides scholarships for all four high schools in Taney County – Branson, Hollister, Forsyth and Bradleyville. This component fund of Taney County Community Foundation was established with a percentage of the Awberry estate. Clay Cantwell, a Branson attorney, assisted with this gift.


Boys and girls club planned giving story

Boys and Girls Club Planned Giving Story


One organization s story

One Organization’s Story

The Boys and Girls Club of Springfield and its Jennie Lincoln Society


What is the jenny lincoln society

What is the Jenny Lincoln Society?

  • The purpose of the Jenny Lincoln Society is to provide hope and opportunity for Springfield area youth by ensuring that the Boys & Girls Clubs of Springfield will always be available for the young people today as well as for generations to come. The Society includes all supporters who have made a planned gift of $10,000 or more to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Springfield.


Who was jenny lincoln

Who was Jenny Lincoln?

Jenny Lincoln is the founder of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Springfield. Life was very tough during and after the great depression in the 1930s. Mrs. Lincoln conceived of the idea after learning of the problems facing local youth from her husband, Juvenile Judge A.W. Lincoln. The first gatherings for boys and caring adults took place at Mrs. Lincolns home. After a great deal of encouragement from the community she found a location on Commercial Street and thus began the North side Boys Club in 1938. After sixty eight years the Boys & Girls Clubs of Springfield continues the mission of its founder by addressing the needs of area at risk youth. The Jenny Lincoln Society supports that mission.


How the boys and girls club promotes planning giving

How the Boys and Girls Club promotes planning giving

Under the guidance of the board of directors and a talented Planned Giving committee, we conduct the following activities:

  • Provide training sessions at board meetings

  • Organize Face to face visits with potential donors highlighting the impact of their gift on the Boys & Girls Clubs of Springfield along with the tax benefits. Maintain periodic conduct with the donor…


How the boys and girls club promotes planning giving continued

How the Boys and Girls Club promotes planning giving (continued)

  • Ensure that Planned Giving is part of the organizations Strategic Plan.

  • Make sure that planned giving information is in all agency publications.

  • Conduct an Annual Jenny Lincoln society luncheon.

  • Provide ongoing planned giving training for key board embers and staff

  • Recognize all donors on a Jenny Lincoln Society plaque and in publications if acceptable by donor.


Seven general rules for a successful planned giving effort

Seven General Rules for a Successful Planned Giving Effort

1. A charitable organization’s board and staff must be committed to planned giving and have a long-term view.


Seven general rules for a successful planned giving effort1

Seven General Rules for a Successful Planned Giving Effort

2. Organizations need to understand that committed, long-term donors are the very best prospects for planned giving.


Seven general rules for a successful planned giving effort2

Seven General Rules for a Successful Planned Giving Effort

3. Marketing and promoting planned giving must be done on a consistent and persistent basis.


Seven general rules for a successful planned giving effort3

Seven General Rules for a Successful Planned Giving Effort

4. Personal relationships are crucial to

the cultivation of planned gifts.


Seven general rules for a successful planned giving effort4

Seven General Rules for a Successful Planned Giving Effort

5. Make your staff and board aware of and knowledgeable on basic elements of estate planning and planned giving.


Seven general rules for a successful planned giving effort5

Seven General Rules for a Successful Planned Giving Effort

6. Be prepared to access/connect “professional advice” to families or individuals who are considering planned gifts.


Seven general rules for a successful planned giving effort6

Seven General Rules for a Successful Planned Giving Effort

7. Engage your professional advisors: The Community Foundation of the Ozarks Professional Advisors Council


Seven specific strategies that work from members of planned giving today

Seven Specific Strategies That Work (from members of Planned Giving Today):

1. “The use of enclosures on planned giving in current gift receipts continues to be very effective. The enclosure has a small amount of copy and then allows the donor to request a brochure on a planned giving topic. This is an inexpensive yet effective way to reach the best prospects.”


Seven specific strategies that work from members of planned giving today1

Seven Specific Strategies That Work (from members of Planned Giving Today):

2. “We started a new gift annuity program last year and received 11 annuities worth about $600,000 in the first year. We appealed to security for senior citizens (first), tax benefits (second), and support for the institution (third). We used letters, workshops, articles, and personal calls.


Seven specific strategies that work from members of planned giving today2

Seven Specific Strategies That Work (from members of Planned Giving Today):

3. “We formed an honorary society to encourage donors to give $100,000 or more in their estate planning. The society was just inaugurated with 43 members.”


Seven specific strategies that work from members of planned giving today3

Seven Specific Strategies That Work (from members of Planned Giving Today):

4. “We have found great success in providing materials, training and services for attorneys, accountants and other planning professionals. We provide calculations and explanatory materials regardless of the intended charitable recipient. Consequently, we are now viewed as the resource for gift-planning advice in our community.”


Seven specific strategies that work from members of planned giving today4

Seven Specific Strategies That Work (from members of Planned Giving Today):

5. “I provide ‘lunch and learn’ sessions in brokerage and financial planning firms during the lunch hour. I bring in food to the firm’s conference room for any staff who attend the program. I emphasize those things in charitable giving that benefit the firm, such as replacement wealth policies, freeing up assets they can trade and helping to solve client problems.”


Seven specific strategies that work from members of planned giving today5

Seven Specific Strategies That Work (from members of Planned Giving Today):

6. “We run a column on planned giving for every issue of our newsletter. The column is in the same space every issue. Generally, the article is about a donor or the work accomplished with a bequest.”


Seven specific strategies that work from members of planned giving today6

Seven Specific Strategies That Work (from members of Planned Giving Today):

7. “I make every attempt to relate the stories of actual donors and their advisors using common English. People understand and relate to the circumstances and motivations of others in similar situation, so I strive to associate real people to each gift plan example I sue. Too man non-donors focus on the plan rather than on the fit, which usually wastes resources; so I take every opportunity to emphasize the fit with the belief that the appropriate plan will follow.”


Questions answers and suggestions

Questions, Answers, and Suggestions?


Thank you

Thank You!

  • Our next presentation will be held on November 28th at 10:00 a.m.

  • This presentation will be titled “Why do Life Estate Gifts have Great Potential?” and will be hosted by Doug Nickell, attorney, Lathrop and Gage.

  • Please contact Bridget Dierks ([email protected]) to enroll.


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