COMPRESSED GAS SAFETY
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 65

WELCOME PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 100 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

COMPRESSED GAS SAFETY. CORPORATE SAFETY TRAINING. OSHA 29 CFR 1910.101. WELCOME. COURSE OBJECTIVES. Discuss Compressed Gas Program Requirements. Discuss Safety Inspection Requirements. Discuss The Types of Compressed Gases. Discuss Properties of Compressed Gases.

Download Presentation

WELCOME

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Welcome

COMPRESSED GAS SAFETY

CORPORATE SAFETY TRAINING

OSHA 29 CFR 1910.101

WELCOME


Welcome

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Discuss Compressed Gas Program Requirements.

  • Discuss Safety Inspection Requirements.

  • Discuss The Types of Compressed Gases.

  • Discuss Properties of Compressed Gases.

  • Discuss Basic Skills in Hazard Recognition & Control.

  • Discuss OSHA’s Requirements for Gas Safety.

  • Discuss the Compressed Gas Association’s involvement.

  • Discuss Use, Storage and Maintenance Requirements.


Welcome

BASIS FOR THIS COURSE

  • Employers are Responsible for Compressed Gas Safety.

  • Compressed Gases Contain a Variety of Hazards.

  • Compressed Gases are Maintained Under High Pressure.

  • Compressed Gases are Extremely Hazardous

  • Training Greatly Lessens the Probability of Disaster.

  • This Training Helps Improve:

  • Safety

  • Morale

  • Productivity

  • Employee well-being


Welcome

COURSE ATTENDEES

  • Gas Users

  • Safety Committees

  • Purchasing Agents

  • Department Managers

  • First Line Supervisors

  • Maintenance Managers

  • Shipping and Receiving Employees

  • Accident Investigation Team Members


Welcome

FORWARD

REGARDING COMPRESSED GAS SAFETY -

Know the gas you are using, or don’t use it! “Never let your name, and the word “dead” be used in the same sentence.”

Billy N. Ring, Fire Captain

Dayton Regional HAZMAT Coordinator

27 Years Experience


Applicable regulations

APPLICABLE REGULATIONS

29CFR - SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS

1910 - INDUSTRIAL SAFETY

101 - COMPRESSED GASES (GENERAL)


Consensus standards

DANGER

COMPRESSED

GAS

STORAGE AREA

CONSENSUS STANDARDS

COMPRESSED GAS ASSOCIATION

CGA P-1 - SAFE HANDLING OF COMPRESSED GASES

- Over 100 Other CGA Safety Manuals


Welcome

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

ALL EMPLOYERS MUST:

  • Assign Responsibility

  • Establish a Written Program

  • Conduct Gas Safety Training

  • Develop Safe-Use Procedures

  • Conduct Work Area Inspections

  • Maintain a Safe Work Environment

  • Conduct Regular Program Evaluations

  • Ensure Proper Storage and Maintenance


Welcome

TRAINING REQUIREMENTS

THE EMPLOYER MUST PROVIDE TRAINING:

  • Properties of the Gases Being Handled.

  • Explain Why a Particular Gas is Required.

  • Conduct Training Prior to Job Assignment.

  • Precautions to be Taken in Using Cylinders.

  • Precautions to be Taken in Storing Cylinders.

  • Precautions to be Taken in Moving Cylinders.

  • Explain Proper Maintenance and Storage of Gases.

  • Explain the Potential Hazards Associated with Gases.

  • Explain The Nature, Extent and Effects of Gas Hazards.


Welcome

RETRAINING REQUIREMENTS

  • REQUIRED WHEN THERE IS A:

  • New Hazard or Gas.

  • Program Related Injury.

  • Change in Job Assignment.

  • New Hazard Control Methods.

  • Failure in the Safety Procedures.

  • Reason to Doubt Employee Proficiency.


Training is important

Reduce injury and illness rates.

Acceptance of high-turnover jobs.

Workers feel better about their work.

Reduce workers’ compensation costs.

Elevate OSHA compliance to a higher level.

TRAINING IS IMPORTANT

A GOOD PROGRAM WILL HELP:


Program implementation

DEDICATION

PERSONAL INTEREST

MANAGEMENT COMMITMENT

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION

IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPRESSED GAS SAFETY PROGRAM REQUIRES:

NOTE:

UNDERSTANDING AND SUPPORT FROM THE WORK FORCE

IS ESSENTIAL, WITHOUT IT THE PROGRAM WILL FAIL!


Program implementation1

Establish responsibility.

Conduct employee training.

Periodically review the program.

Perform inspections and maintenance.

Modify policies and rules as appropriate.

Eliminate hazardous gases where possible.

Establish a corporate policy and develop rules.

Substitute nonhazardous gases where possible.

Conduct a compressed gas safety survey of the facility.

Provide protection where hazard elimination is not possible.

DANGER

COMPRESSED

GAS

STORAGE AREA

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION

Continued

DEVELOPMENT SEQUENCE:


Implementation strategy

RECOGNITION

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

  • EVALUATION

  • IMPLEMENTATION

  • CONTROL


Implementation strategy1

ASSESSMENT OF GAS HAZARDS:

Known jobs/areas having gas usage.

Jobs/areas with new equipment or processes.

New jobs having little or no statistical injury data.

Jobs/areas having had recent operational changes.

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Continued

  • RECOGNITION


Implementation strategy2

RECOGNITION

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Continued

  • EVALUATION

  • IMPLEMENTATION

  • CONTROL


Implementation strategy3

EVALUATION

Facility audit data.

Employee surveys.

Accident investigations.

Logs of employee complaints.

Statistical evidence of known/potential hazards.

Injury and illness data of known/potential hazards.

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Continued


Implementation strategy4

RECOGNITION

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Continued

  • EVALUATION

  • IMPLEMENTATION

  • CONTROL


Implementation strategy5

IMPLEMENTATION

Written program.

Training program.

Employee involvement.

Supervisor involvement.

Corrective action program.

Job hazard analysis program.

Safety in purchasing (new gases, substitutes etc.)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Continued


Implementation strategy6

RECOGNITION

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Continued

  • EVALUATION

  • IMPLEMENTATION

  • CONTROL


Implementation strategy7

CONTROL

Periodic facility audits.

Written program reviews.

Employee feedback surveys.

Job hazard analysis reviews.

Recurrent training programs.

Supervisor feedback surveys.

Periodic statistical evaluations.

Corrective action follow-up measures.

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Continued


Implementation strategy8

CONTROL MEASURES CONSIDERATIONS:

Capital improvement plan to eliminated hazards.

Costs involved in purchasing substitutes gases.

Length of time necessary for implementation.

Level of urgency in implementation.

Compatibility with existing processes or controls.

Anticipated problems with employee use.

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Continued


Implementation strategy9

PRIORITIZATION CONSIDERATIONS:

Severity of injuries as a result of hazards.

Consequences of an injury at the worksite.

Likelihood that the operation will have an injury.

The length of exposure to the hazard.

Long-term effects of hazardous gas use.

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Continued


The supervisor s role

CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING:

THE SUPERVISOR’S ROLE

  • 1. KNOW THE GASES YOU USE!

  • 2. GET INVOLVED IN THE HAZARD ASSESSMENTS.

  • 3. OBTAIN ASSISTANCE (IF NEEDED) FROM YOUR SUPPLIERS.

  • 4. OBTAIN ASSISTANCE (IF NEEDED) FROM EXPERTS IN THE FIELD OF GAS SAFETY, CGA (703) 412-0900.

  • 5. COMPLETE THE PAPERWORK (WORK ORDERS, POLICY

  • CHANGES, ETC.) TO MAKE CORRECTIVE ACTIONS.

  • 6. ATTEND THE SAME TRAINING AS YOUR WORKERS.

  • 7. FOLLOW-UP ON THE ACTIONS YOU TOOK.


Compressed gas hazards

PRINCIPAL HAZARDS:

COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDS

  • Extremely High Pressure.

  • Toxicity.

  • Reactivity.

  • Instability.

  • Flammability.

  • Extreme Low Temperature.

  • Asphyxiation.

  • Radioactivity.


Compressed gas hazards1

WHEN THINGS GO WRONG:

COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDS

Continued

  • Have Flown Over a Half Mile.

  • Penetrated Brick Walls.

  • Can Displace Oxygen in Extremely Large Areas.

  • Can Oxygen-Enrich Extremely Large Areas.

  • Can Spin and Ricochet Completely Out of Control.

  • Can Immediately Freeze Exposed Skin.

  • Can Explode With Tremendous Force.

  • Can be Virtually Unstoppable.


Compressed gas hazards2

THE TYPICAL COMPRESSED GAS CYLINDER:

COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDS

Continued

  • 175 Pounds.

  • 2,000 to 2,640 psig (some to 6,000 psig).

  • Wall Thickness of About 1/4 Inch.

  • 57 Inches Tall.

  • 9 Inches In Diameter.

  • Easily Toppled.

  • Easily Corroded.

  • Devastatingly Hazardous.


Basic safety rules

BASIC SAFETY RULES

I’LL GET THE RUST OFF

OF THIS THING ONE WAY

OR ANOTHER!

KIDS DON’T TRY THIS AT HOME!


Basic safety rules1

THE BIG THREE:

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • Oxidizers: Must not be used in contact with oils, greases or other hydrocarbons.

  • Flammables: Must not be exposed to flames, sparks or arcs including static electricity, hot surfaces or oxidizers.

  • NonFlammables: Must not be allowed to displace air in confined work spaces so that there is insufficient oxygen for breathing.


Basic safety rules2

FILLING OF CYLINDERS:

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • Cylinders may not be filled except by the supplier of the cylinder or with the supplier’s consent.

  • Where filling is authorized it must be accomplished in strict accordance with DOT, OSHA and CGA regulations.


Basic safety rules3

CONTENT IDENTIFICATION:

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • Never assume you know what it is!

  • Assuming (with gases) gets you dead!

  • Labels must be legible at all times.

  • Labels may not be altered or removed.

  • Labels may not be bypassed, ignored, or otherwise defeated.

  • Labels must be understood by all.

  • Nonlegible/missing labels must be reported.


Basic safety rules4

CONTENT IDENTIFICATION:

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

Continued

  • Labels and their means of attachment must withstand their normal operating environment.

  • Labels may evoke a false sense of security, and their meaning needs to be understood.

  • Labels must be securely attached to cylinders so that they cannot be inadvertently or accidentally detached during use.

  • Each container must bear the proper label for the gas contained.


Basic safety rules5

PAINTING CONTAINERS:

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • Containers may not be painted.

  • Painting may cover cylinder defects.

  • Containers showing signs of corrosion must be removed from service and returned to the supplier.

  • Never rely solely on the cylinder color for identification.


Basic safety rules6

LEAKING AND DEFECTIVE CYLINDERS:

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • Never underestimate the hazard!

  • Notify co-workers of the hazard.

  • Consider evacuation of the area.

  • Evacuate to open air, up-wind or side-wind.

  • Report the contents, location, situation.

  • Begin role call to account for co-workers.

  • Do not return to work until all-clear is given.


Basic safety rules7

CYLINDER USAGE REQUIREMENTS:

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • Verify contents before transporting or using.

  • Keep cylinder caps on until ready to connect.

  • Keep valve caps on until ready to use.

  • Never use as a door stop.

  • Never underestimate the hazard.


Basic safety rules8

MOVEMENT OF COMPRESSED GAS CYLINDERS:

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • Never handle roughly.

  • Never use magnetic lifting devices.

  • Never lift by valves or cylinder caps.

  • Never roll, drag, or slide the cylinder.

  • Always use a hand-truck, fork truck etc.

  • Cradles, ropes, chains, or slings are prohibited from use unless lugs or lifting attachments are provided by the manufacturer.


Basic safety rules9

STORAGE REQUIREMENTS (GENERAL):

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • “No Smoking” signs must be posted.

  • The name of the gas must be posted.

  • Specific hazards must be posted.

  • Containers must be stored up right.

  • Gases must be stored with like gases.

  • Do not intermingle full and empty containers.

  • The oldest material must be used first.

  • Stored only on stable surfaces.

  • Some gases must always be shaded from sun.


Basic safety rules10

STORAGE ROOMS (GENERAL):

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • Must be dry.

  • Must not exceed 125 F.

  • Must be well ventilated.

  • Should be protected from tampering.

  • Local fire inspectors should evaluate.

  • NFPA guidelines should be reviewed.

  • Subsurface storage should be avoided.

  • Should be of fire-resistive construction.


Basic safety rules11

STORAGE ROOMS (GENERAL):

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • Cylinders

  • - Must not impede emergency egress.

  • - Cannot be located near exits.

  • - Cannot be located near stairs.

  • Must be secured to prevent toppling.


Basic safety rules12

OUTDOOR STORAGE (GENERAL):

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • Bottoms must be protected from corrosion.

  • Must be secured to prevent toppling.

  • Must be shaded in extreme temperatures.

  • Some gases must always be shaded from sun.

  • Should be of fire-resistive construction.

  • Should be protected from tampering.

  • Local fire inspectors should evaluate.

  • NFPA guidelines should be reviewed.


Basic safety rules13

ACETYLENE

DANGER

NO SMOKING

NO FUMAR

4

3

1

GAS

INSPECTION

CHECKLIST

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • NAME

  • PRECAUTIONS

  • RESTRAINED ABOVE

  • MIDPOINT

  • EMERGENCY & USE

  • PROCEDURES

  • AWAY FROM

  • COMBUSTIBLES


Basic safety rules14

GENERAL INSPECTION CRITERIA:

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

INSPECT FOR:POSSIBLE RESULT:

DentsWeakening of cylinder wall

Crevice CorrosionWeakening of cylinder wall

BulgesWeakening of cylinder wall

ARC/ Torch BurnsWeakening of cylinder wall

Cuts, Gouges or DigsDecrease in wall thickness

CorrosionDecrease in wall thickness

PittingDecrease in wall thickness

Neck DefectsLeak or cylinder explosion

Valve Ease-Of-MovementCorrosion leading to leak

Valve Thread ServiceabilityLeak during operation


Basic safety rules15

PRE-OPERATION SAFETY RULES:

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • If you’re not trained don’t touch it!

  • Read the Material Safety Data Sheet before use.

  • Ensure an “In Use” label is present.

  • Ensure all labels/warnings are readable.

  • Place upright on stable dry surface.

  • Ensure cylinder is restrained above midpoint.

  • Keep heat, flame, & electrical sources from gas.

  • Use in accordance with established procedures.


Basic safety rules16

POST-OPERATION SAFETY RULES:

BASIC SAFETY RULES

Continued

  • If you’re not trained don’t touch it!

  • Read the Material Safety Data Sheet.

  • Ensure an “Empty” label is present.

  • Close valve completely and cap cylinder.

  • Remove from operation (established procedures).

  • Transport cylinder using a handtruck.

  • Place in “Empty Container” storage area.

  • Ensure “Empty” label is readable.


Storage rules

STORAGE VARIES GREATLY,

HERE ARE A FEW EXAMPLES OF COMMON STORAGE REQUIREMENTS. ASK YOUR LOCAL FIRE INSPECTOR TO HELP YOU WITH YOUR SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES.

STORAGE RULES


Storage rules1

USE OLDEST STOCK FIRST!

DANGER

FULL

CYLINDERS

NO

SMOKING!

ACETYLENE

DANGER

GAS

STORAGE

CHECKLIST

COMPRESSED

GAS

STORAGE AREA

4

3

1

STORAGE RULES

Continued


Storage rules2

FULL CYLINDER STORAGE RULES:

STORAGE RULES

Continued

  • If you’re not trained don’t touch it!

  • Read the Material Safety Data Sheet.

  • Do not smoke.

  • Mark cylinder with date of storage.

  • Rotate oldest product to front.

  • Rotate oldest product to front and use first.

  • Inspect cylinder for damage before storage.

  • Store with like kind of gas.


Storage rules3

FULL CYLINDER STORAGE RULES:

STORAGE RULES

Continued

Continued

  • Ensure all labels are readable.

  • Ensure valve assembly is tightly capped.

  • Ensure cylinder is restrained above midpoint.

  • Store upright on stable dry surface.

  • Keep electrical devices away from gas.

  • Keep combustible materials away from gas.

  • Keep heat, flame and ignition sources from gas.

  • Never underestimate the hazard.


Storage rules4

EMPTY CYLINDER STORAGE RULES:

STORAGE RULES

Continued

  • If you’re not trained don’t touch it!

  • Read the Material Safety Data Sheet.

  • Do not smoke.

  • Ensure the cylinder is empty.

  • Ensure valve assembly is closed tightly.

  • Ensure valve assembly is capped tightly.

  • Inspect cylinder for damage before storage.

  • Store with like kind of gas cylinders.


Storage rules5

EMPTY CYLINDER STORAGE RULES:

STORAGE RULES

Continued

Continued

  • Ensure all labels are readable.

  • Ensure cylinder is restrained above midpoint.

  • Store upright on a stable dry surface.

  • Keep electrical devices away from gas.

  • Keep combustible materials away from gas.

  • Keep heat and flame away from gas.

  • Never underestimate the hazard.


Specific types of gases

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF GASES USED IN INDUSTRY. HERE ARE A FEW EXAMPLES OF COMMONLY USED GASES. ASK YOUR SUPPLIER TO HELP YOU WITH YOUR SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES.


Specific types of gases1

OXYGEN (INCLUDING OXIDIZING GASES):

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued

  • Oxygen and oxidizers can be deadly.

  • Cleanliness is absolutely essential!!!

  • Explosion results upon contact with hydrocarbons.

  • Keep oil, grease, and other hydrocarbons away!

  • Ensure process or system is compatible with oxygen.

  • Assess compatibility of equipment and materials.

  • Separate from combustible materials.

  • Oxygen can “fuel enrich” permeable materials.

  • Oxygen enriched materials burn tremendously.


Specific types of gases2

THE pH of ACIDS AND BASES

pH IS THE NUMERICAL MEASURE OF ITS RELATIVE

ACIDITY OR ALKALINITY. THE RANGE IS FROM 0 - 14

WITH A NEUTRAL LEVEL EXPRESSED AS A pH OF 7.0.

pH ABOVE 7.0- MORE ALKALINE OR BASIC.

pH BELOW 7.0- MORE ACIDIC.

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued


Specific types of gases3

CHECK FOR COMPATIBILITY!

ACID

BASE

LOW pH

HIGH pH

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued


Specific types of gases4

ACID & ALKALINE GASES:

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued

  • Avoid contact with all bodily routes of entry.

  • Wear goggles and suitable skin protection.

  • Consider effects on the respiratory tract.

  • Long sleeves and trousers are mandatory.

  • Open toed shoes or sneakers are prohibited.

  • Gas masks/SCBA must be immediately available.

  • SCBA must be used when the concentration could exceed the rating of the gas mask canister or if the gas could displace oxygen to below 19 percent.


Specific types of gases5

ACID & ALKALINE GASES:

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued

Continued

  • Emergency showers/eyewashes must be available.

  • Quantities on-site must be limited.

  • Ventilation must be adequate in the work area.

  • Common corrosive and toxic gases include:

- Boron Trichloride - Bromine Trifluoride

- Chlorine Trifluoride - Hydrogen Fluoride

- Iodine Pentafluoride - Silicon Tetrafluoride

- Sulfur Tetrafluoride - Tungsten Hexafluoride


Specific types of gases6

BHOPAL, INDIA:

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued

  • Over 2000 people died.

  • Methyl isocyanate released.

  • Occurred in December 1984.

  • SARA Title III initially proposed as a result.

  • The Union Carbide Facility was not unique.

  • The accident could have occurred anywhere.

  • Most were inhabitants in the area of the plant.


Specific types of gases7

HIGHLY TOXIC GASES:

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued

  • Remember Bhopal India!

  • Training is critical.

  • The specific hazards must be understood.

  • Threshold Limit Values must be determined.

  • Storage is critical and must be assessed.

  • Ventilation is critical and must be assessed.

  • Gas discharges must be scrubbed.

  • Discharges must be neutralized.

  • On-site quantities must be limited.


Specific types of gases8

HIGHLY TOXIC GASES:

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued

Continued

  • Medical services should be pre-planned.

  • Suppliers/manufacturers should be consulted.

  • Emergency responders should consulted.

  • Common highly toxic gases include:

- Arsine - Boron Trichloride

- Bromine Trifluoride - Bromine Pentafluoride

- Chlorine - Fluorine

- Germane - Hydrogen Cyanide

- Hydrogen Selenide - Hydrogen Sulfide

- Nitric Oxide - Phosgene


Specific types of gases9

CRYOGENIC LIQUEFIED GASES:

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued

  • In liquid form at relatively low pressures.

  • Extremely low temperatures.

  • Usually below - 238F (- 150C).

  • Handled in heavily insulated containers.

  • Insulated containers minimize evaporation.

  • Proper operation of venting systems is essential.

  • High expansion rate on vaporization.

  • Can cause extreme bodily damage on contact.

  • Full body protection must be utilized.


Specific types of gases10

CRYOGENIC LIQUEFIED GASES:

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued

Continued

Oxygen

Rate of Expansion

3

875 ft

3

+65F

1ft

- 238F


Specific types of gases11

LOX

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued

  • CRYOGENIC LIQUEFIED GASES:

Continued

  • Use only hardware designed for cryogenics.

  • Pain is not immediate.

  • Tissue solidifies over time.

  • Blood circulation is arrested.

  • Serious skin burns may result.

  • Blood clots are highly probable.

  • Skin highly vulnerable to infection.

  • Flush with tepid water.


Specific types of gases12

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued

  • INERT GASES:

  • Can displace oxygen leading to asphyxiation.

  • SCBA or airline systems must be used.

  • Oxygen content below 19 percent is dangerous.

  • Common highly inert gases include:

- Argon - Carbon Dioxide

- Helium - Neon

- Nitrogen - Xenon


Specific types of gases13

GENERAL SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS

SPECIFIC TYPES OF GASES

Continued

  • Don’t be afraid to ask people to wait!

  • Limit conversation while using gases.

  • Know that you could be seriously injured.

  • Know that no one ever expected to get injured.

  • Know that none of us is immune to injury.

  • Know the safe procedures before starting work.

  • Know the location of first aid kits.

  • Avoid horseplay - don’t tolerate it from others.

  • Think about going home in the same shape.

  • Know your gas!


Welcome

INSPECTION AND CARE OF GASES

  • INSPECTION CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Develop a detailed inspection policy.

  • Document each inspection.

  • Inspect all gases before issue or use.

  • Tag as unusable, damaged cylinders.

  • Inspect cylinders before each use (without exception).

  • Separate damaged cylinders from serviceable cylinders.

  • Consider the effects on gases stored for long periods.

  • Remove damaged cylinders from service immediately.


  • Login